BabelStone // CC0 (Public Domain)
BabelStone // CC0 (Public Domain)

Watch Brits Play the Oldest Board Game On Earth

BabelStone // CC0 (Public Domain)
BabelStone // CC0 (Public Domain)

The Royal Game of Ur is the oldest known board game—it's at least 4000 years old! The British Museum has a copy, complete with wooden board, seven black markers, seven white markers, and four tetrahedral dice.

Although the game was discovered in the 1920s, its rules were deciphered later by British Museum curator Irving Finkel. He translated a cuneiform tablet found separately in order to puzzle out how it worked. (There's a terrific video describing this process.) In the video below, Finkel teaches YouTuber Tom Scott to play. Have a look:

If you're curious, the game is on BoardGameGeek and you can read about the British Museum's copy.

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iStock
How Your Sleeping Position Can Help (or Harm) Your Health
iStock
iStock

Getting a good night's sleep is key to your health, but what's the best position for maximizing those benefits? According to SciShow, the answer depends on who you are and what your body is presently doing. Do you have acid reflux? You might want to avoid sleeping on your right side, since studies have shown that can aggravate heartburn (though scientists still aren't quite sure why). Are you pregnant? Aim for the left side, since it helps blood and nutrients flow to the placenta, among other benefits. Do you snore? Maybe avoid sleeping on your back, and roll over on your side instead. The video below goes over the whole menu of possible sleeping positions, and explains which ones will help you get the most out of your 40 winks.

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NASA, Getty Images
Watch Apollo 11 Launch
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
NASA, Getty Images

Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969, on its way to the moon. In the video below, Mark Gray shows slow-motion footage of the launch (a Saturn V rocket) and explains in glorious detail what's going on from a technical perspective—the launch is very complex, and lots of stuff has to happen just right in order to get a safe launch. The video is mesmerizing, the narration is informative. Prepare to geek out about rockets! (Did you know the hold-down arms actually catch on fire after the rocket lifts off?)

Apollo 11 Saturn V Launch (HD) Camera E-8 from Spacecraft Films on Vimeo.

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