7 Kids Who Helped Solve Crimes

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Children are messy, hyper, allergic to lots of things, and vomit a lot more often than adults do. Despite these deficits, they can sometimes be counted on to help resolve a crime. Check out seven times kids lent a (probably sticky) hand and brought criminals to justice.

1. THE DRAWING THAT HELPED SOLVE A HIT AND RUN

Let’s face it: Most kids aren’t budding Picassos, and their early artwork is bound either for the refrigerator door or the trash. But two cousins in northwest Germany—one eight years old, the other nine—had enough illustrative talent to communicate to authorities exactly what happened when a driver ran into a parked car in their tiny town of Oer-Erkenschwick in early 2017. The boys showed police the route the offending vehicle took and also provided a description, which led to the errant operator being located.

2. THE GRADE SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO NABBED A VANDAL

Filing into classes on a Monday morning in 2005, 20 grade school students at the Brookstead State School in Queensland, Australia noticed that someone had slashed their tennis court nets. Unfortunately for the perpetrator, the kids had been taking a forensic science class that term and knew how to secure the scene and collect evidence. They photographed footprints on the court and turned them over to police. When the thief returned a second night to steal food from the school, police caught up with him and matched his shoes to the prints. Justice served.

3. THE STICK FIGURE SKETCH ARTIST

Forensic artists typically use eyewitness descriptions to draw composite sketches of possible criminal suspects, a skill that can take years of training to perfect. Alternately, it seems, police can just ask an 11-year-old girl to do it. Cops in Stratford, Connecticut were investigating a rash of burglaries in 2015 and began knocking on doors to see if anyone had any information to offer. One resident, Rebecca DePietro, volunteered to draft a rough sketch of a man she had seen following a break-in at her family home. The doodle was compared to a photo police had of a suspect that helped confirm his identity. His arrest led to a subsequent confession to 10 break-ins. Police honored DePietro at a ceremony for her role in helping curb the crime spree.

4. THE 8-YEAR-OLD WHO SMASHED A CRIME RING

Nashville, Tennessee native Landon Crabtree felt the sting of the morally corrupt when thieves broke into his family’s home in 2012 and made off with his PlayStation and iPad. Insurance covered the losses, but Crabtree was annoyed that the perp had gone unpunished. Incensed, the 8-year-old loaded up an app called Find My iPhone that’s able to locate a device with iTunes on it and pinpoint its location via GPS. Crabtree showed his father exactly where it was, and he shared that information with police. The burglar was found with a trove of stolen materials; the tiny Elliot Ness told the press he plans to be an FBI agent when he grows up.

5. THE GRANDDAUGHTER WHO SHAMED THE COPS

When her grandmother’s home in Atlanta, Georgia was burglarized in 2011, 12-year-old Jessica Maple used skills acquired during a summer camp for aspiring district attorneys to expedite results. Despite police telling her someone would have needed a key to get into the home, Maple found that the attached garage had been broken into. She also discovered some of her relative’s possessions at a pawn shop down the road. The store owner knew the men who had brought in the items, which allowed Maple to confront him directly (which is not recommended, junior detectives) and provoke a confession. Police eventually made an arrest, which is fine, since Maple was probably about to do that, too.

6. THE TYKE WHO SPOTTED A STOLEN BIKE

An unidentified six-year-old in Portland, Oregon was watching the evening news in late 2016 when he saw a story on a stolen bike. The owner, Jason Eland, was distressed that his only mode of transport was missing. Some time later, the boy spotted the bike while out with his parents. He told them and they phoned in a tip to police, who matched the serial number and eventually arrested the alleged thief. It's probably not a cool jail story that the citizen who put you away has only a 50/50 chance of successfully tying his own shoes.

7. THE KIDS WHO FORMED A HUMAN ARROW TO POINT TO SUSPECTS

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It was supposed to be a relaxing Easter egg hunt. But when parents and their kids in Capel, Surrey outside London headed for a field in April 2016, they found themselves caught up in a police chase. As a helicopter buzzed overhead, the kids formed a human arrow large enough for the pilot to spot that it was pointing in the direction the thieves were headed. The chopper relayed the information to police on the ground, who captured the two suspects without further incident. After landing to thank the children, authorities happily accepted some chocolate intended for the Easter party.

DNA Links Polish Barber Aaron Kosminski to Jack the Ripper Murders, But Experts Are Skeptical

Express Newspapers/Getty Images
Express Newspapers/Getty Images

Many people have been suspected of being Jack the Ripper, from author Lewis Carroll to Liverpool cotton salesman James Maybrick, but the perpetrator of the grisly crimes that gripped Victorian London has never been identified. Now, one of the case's first suspects is back in the news. As Smithsonian reports, Aaron Kosminski, a barber from Poland, has been linked to the Jack the Ripper murders with DNA evidence—but experts are hesitant to call the case closed.

The new claim comes from data now published in the Journal of Forensic Science. Several years ago, Ripperologist Russell Edwards asked researchers from the University of Leeds and John Moores University in Liverpool to analyze a blood-stained silk shawl thought to have belonged to Ripper victim Catherine Eddowes. The item, which Edwards owns, has been a primary piece of evidence in the murder investigation for years. In 2014, Edwards published a book in which he claimed Aaron Kosminski's DNA had been found on the garment, but his results weren't published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Five years later, the researchers have released their findings. Using infrared and spectrophotometry technology, they confirmed the fabric was stained with blood and discovered a possible semen stain. They collected DNA fragments from the stain and compared them to DNA taken from a descendent of Eddowes and a descendent of Kosminski. The mitochondrial DNA (the DNA passed down from mother to offspring) extracted from the shawl contained matching profiles for both subjects.

Kosminski was a 23-year-old Polish barber living in London at the time of the Jack the Ripper murders. He was one of the first suspects identified by the London police, but there wasn't enough evidence to convict him in 1888.

Following the newest study, many Jack the Ripper experts are saying there still isn't enough evidence to definitively pin the murders on Kosminski. One of the main issues is that a mitochondrial DNA match isn't as conclusive as matches with other DNA; many people have the same mitochondrial DNA profile, even if they're not related, so the forensic tool is best used for ruling out suspects rather than confirming them.

The shawl at the center of the study is also controversial. It was supposedly picked up by a police officer at the scene of Eddowes's murder, but that version of the story has been disputed. The shawl's origin also been traced back to multiple eras, including the early 1800s and early 1900s, as well as different parts of Europe.

Due to many factors complicating the Jack the Ripper case, the murders may never be solved completely. The crimes spurred a flurry of hoax letters to the London Police department in the 1880s, and even the letters that were thought to be authentic, like the one that gave Jack the Ripper his nickname, may have been fabricated.

[h/t Smithsonian]

Last Surviving Person of Interest in Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist to Be Released From Prison

Federal Bureau of Investigation, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain

Almost exactly 29 years ago, two men disguised as police officers weaseled their way into Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and started removing prized artworks from the wall. They made off with 13 famous paintings and sculptures, representing a value of more than $500 million. It remains the largest property theft in U.S. history, but no one has ever been charged in connection with the heist.

Now, as Smithsonian reports, the last living person who may have first-hand knowledge about the heist will be released from prison this Sunday after serving 54 months for an unrelated crime. Robert (Bobby) Gentile, an 82-year-old mobster who was jailed for selling a gun to a known murderer, has been questioned by authorities in the past. In 2010, the wife of the late mobster Robert (Bobby) Guarente told investigators she had seen her husband give several of the artworks in question to Gentile—a good friend of Guarente’s—eight years prior.

A 2012 raid of Gentile’s home also revealed a list of black market prices for the stolen items. Previous testimony from other mob associates—coupled with the fact that Gentile had failed a polygraph test when he was questioned about the art heist—suggest Gentile might know more about the crime than he has let on. For his part, though, Gentile says he is innocent and knows nothing about the art or the heist.

The FBI announced in 2013 that it knew who was responsible for the museum heist, but would not reveal their names because they were dead. Still, the whereabouts of the artworks—including prized paintings by Rembrandt, Manet, Vermeer, and Degas—remain unknown. The museum is offering a $10 million reward to anyone who can provide information leading to “the recovery of all 13 works in good condition," according to the museum's website. A separate $100,000 reward will be provided for the return of an eagle finial that was used by Napoleon’s Imperial Guard.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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