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7 Kids Who Helped Solve Crimes

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Children are messy, hyper, allergic to lots of things, and vomit a lot more often than adults do. Despite these deficits, they can sometimes be counted on to help resolve a crime. Check out seven times kids lent a (probably sticky) hand and brought criminals to justice.

1. THE DRAWING THAT HELPED SOLVE A HIT AND RUN

Let’s face it: Most kids aren’t budding Picassos, and their early artwork is bound either for the refrigerator door or the trash. But two cousins in northwest Germany—one eight years old, the other nine—had enough illustrative talent to communicate to authorities exactly what happened when a driver ran into a parked car in their tiny town of Oer-Erkenschwick in early 2017. The boys showed police the route the offending vehicle took and also provided a description, which led to the errant operator being located.

2. THE GRADE SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO NABBED A VANDAL

Filing into classes on a Monday morning in 2005, 20 grade school students at the Brookstead State School in Queensland, Australia noticed that someone had slashed their tennis court nets. Unfortunately for the perpetrator, the kids had been taking a forensic science class that term and knew how to secure the scene and collect evidence. They photographed footprints on the court and turned them over to police. When the thief returned a second night to steal food from the school, police caught up with him and matched his shoes to the prints. Justice served.

3. THE STICK FIGURE SKETCH ARTIST

Forensic artists typically use eyewitness descriptions to draw composite sketches of possible criminal suspects, a skill that can take years of training to perfect. Alternately, it seems, police can just ask an 11-year-old girl to do it. Cops in Stratford, Connecticut were investigating a rash of burglaries in 2015 and began knocking on doors to see if anyone had any information to offer. One resident, Rebecca DePietro, volunteered to draft a rough sketch of a man she had seen following a break-in at her family home. The doodle was compared to a photo police had of a suspect that helped confirm his identity. His arrest led to a subsequent confession to 10 break-ins. Police honored DePietro at a ceremony for her role in helping curb the crime spree.

4. THE 8-YEAR-OLD WHO SMASHED A CRIME RING

Nashville, Tennessee native Landon Crabtree felt the sting of the morally corrupt when thieves broke into his family’s home in 2012 and made off with his PlayStation and iPad. Insurance covered the losses, but Crabtree was annoyed that the perp had gone unpunished. Incensed, the 8-year-old loaded up an app called Find My iPhone that’s able to locate a device with iTunes on it and pinpoint its location via GPS. Crabtree showed his father exactly where it was, and he shared that information with police. The burglar was found with a trove of stolen materials; the tiny Elliot Ness told the press he plans to be an FBI agent when he grows up.

5. THE GRANDDAUGHTER WHO SHAMED THE COPS

When her grandmother’s home in Atlanta, Georgia was burglarized in 2011, 12-year-old Jessica Maple used skills acquired during a summer camp for aspiring district attorneys to expedite results. Despite police telling her someone would have needed a key to get into the home, Maple found that the attached garage had been broken into. She also discovered some of her relative’s possessions at a pawn shop down the road. The store owner knew the men who had brought in the items, which allowed Maple to confront him directly (which is not recommended, junior detectives) and provoke a confession. Police eventually made an arrest, which is fine, since Maple was probably about to do that, too.

6. THE TYKE WHO SPOTTED A STOLEN BIKE

An unidentified six-year-old in Portland, Oregon was watching the evening news in late 2016 when he saw a story on a stolen bike. The owner, Jason Eland, was distressed that his only mode of transport was missing. Some time later, the boy spotted the bike while out with his parents. He told them and they phoned in a tip to police, who matched the serial number and eventually arrested the alleged thief. It's probably not a cool jail story that the citizen who put you away has only a 50/50 chance of successfully tying his own shoes.

7. THE KIDS WHO FORMED A HUMAN ARROW TO POINT TO SUSPECTS

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It was supposed to be a relaxing Easter egg hunt. But when parents and their kids in Capel, Surrey outside London headed for a field in April 2016, they found themselves caught up in a police chase. As a helicopter buzzed overhead, the kids formed a human arrow large enough for the pilot to spot that it was pointing in the direction the thieves were headed. The chopper relayed the information to police on the ground, who captured the two suspects without further incident. After landing to thank the children, authorities happily accepted some chocolate intended for the Easter party.

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Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons // Nigel Parry, USA Network
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Meghan Markle Is Related to H.H. Holmes, America’s First Serial Killer, According to New Documentary
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons // Nigel Parry, USA Network
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons // Nigel Parry, USA Network

Between staging paparazzi photos and writing open letters to Prince Harry advising him to call off his wedding, Meghan Markle’s family has been keeping the media pretty busy lately. But it turns out that her bloodline's talent for grabbing headlines dates back much further than the announcement that Markle and Prince Harry were getting hitched—and for much more sinister reasons. According to Meet the Markles, a new television documentary produced for England’s Channel Four, the former Suits star has a distant relation to H.H. Holmes, America’s first serial killer.

The claim comes from Holmes’s great-great-grandson, American lawyer Jeff Mudgett, who recently discovered that he and Markle are eighth cousins. If that connection is correct, then it would mean that Markle, too, is related to Holmes.

While finding out that you’re related—however distantly—to a man believed to have murdered 27 people isn’t something you’d probably want to share with Queen Elizabeth II when asking her to pass the Yorkshire pudding at Christmas dinner, what makes the story even more interesting is that Mudgett believes that his great-great-grandpa was also Jack the Ripper!

Mudgett came to this conclusion based on Holmes’s personal diaries, which he inherited. In 2017, American Ripper—an eight-part History Channel series—investigated Mudgett’s belief that Holmes and Jack were indeed one and the same.

When asked about his connection to Markle, and their shared connection to Holmes—and, possibly, Jack the Ripper—Mudgett replied:

“We did a study with the FBI and CIA and Scotland Yard regarding handwriting analysis. It turns out [H. H. Holmes] was Jack the Ripper. This means Meghan is related to Jack the Ripper. I don’t think the Queen knows. I am not proud he is my ancestor. Meghan won’t be either.”

Shortly thereafter he clarified his comments via his personal Facebook page:

In the 130 years since Jack the Ripper terrorized London’s Whitechapel neighborhood, hundreds of names have been put forth as possible suspects, but authorities have never been able to definitively conclude who committed the infamous murders. So if Alice's Adventures in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll could have done it, why not the distant relative of the royal family's newest member?

[h/t: ID CrimeFeed]

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A New D.B. Cooper Suspect Has Emerged
FBI
FBI

The identity of skyjacker D.B. Cooper—a well-mannered passenger on Northwest Orient Airlines Flight 305 who parachuted out of the skyjacked plane heading to Seattle in November 1971 with $200,000 in cash—has long intrigued both law enforcement and amateur sleuths. One theory posited that Cooper may have even been a woman in disguise.

In July 2017, the FBI officially closed the case. This week, they might take another look at their archival material. An 84-year-old pet sitter from DeLand, Florida named Carl Laurin has made a public proclamation that a deceased friend of his, Walter R. Reca, once admitted he was the country’s most notorious airborne thief.

The announcement is tied to the publication of Laurin’s book, D.B. Cooper & Me: A Criminal, a Spy, and a Best Friend. And while some may discount the admission as an attempt to sell books, the book's publisher—Principia Media—claims it vetted Laurin’s claims via a third-party investigator.

According to Laurin, he and Reca met while both were skydivers in the 1950s and kept in touch over the years. Reca was a military paratrooper and received an Honorable Discharge from the Air Force in 1965. Laurin suspected his friend immediately following the skyjacking since he had previously broken the law, including an attempted robbery at a Bob’s Big Boy restaurant as well as several banks. But Reca didn’t admit guilt until shortly before his death in 2014, when he handed over audiotapes of his confession and made Laurin promise not to reveal them until after he had passed away.

Principia Media publisher/CEO Vern Jones says he expects skeptics to challenge the book’s claims, but says that the evidence provided by Laurin was “overwhelming.” The FBI has yet to comment on any of the specifics of Laurin’s story, but an agency spokesperson told The Washington Post that “plausible theories” have yet to convey “necessary proof of culpability.” Nonetheless, someone at the Bureau probably has a weekend of reading ahead of them.

[h/t MSN]

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