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Oh My Disney via YouTube

Oh My Disney via YouTube

How Pixar Changes Movies for International Audiences

Oh My Disney via YouTube

Oh My Disney via YouTube

How well domestic movies fare at the international box office has quickly become one of the most important contributors to their overall financial success. Rather than simply drop a film into Japanese or Chinese theaters with nothing more than subtitles added, studios have taken to tweaking and customizing major releases for foreign markets. For example, 2013’s Iron Man 3 featured extended sequences referencing China that were left out of the U.S. cut.

The powerhouse computer animation studio Pixar is no different, although their customizations can usually be accomplished less with passports and more with the click of a mouse. The Disney fact guide Oh My Disney recently posted a video offering side-by-side comparison shots of Pixar’s subtle changes for different audiences.

In addition to translating the language in their titles and dialogue, movies like Up can also wind up replacing imagery to make it more accessible to foreign-language viewers. The change jar in Up, which originally read "Paradise Falls," was screened overseas with a jar depicting an image of Paradise Falls; in Inside Out, a fussy baby is fed bell peppers instead of broccoli in Japan, since broccoli is well-liked in Japan.

You can take a look at more differences in the video below:

[h/t /Film]

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travel
See the Spot That Inspired Sleeping Beauty's Castle
Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

When Walt and Lillian Disney took a European vacation prior to the construction of Disneyland, they were particularly inspired by one location in southwest Bavaria, Germany: Neuschwanstein Castle. Built by King of Bavaria Ludwig II starting in 1869, the castle was meant to have serious dramatic flair; the king hired a stage designer from Munich, Christian Jank, to design it.

Walt Disney went on to use Neuschwanstein as the basis for Sleeping Beauty's castle in Disneyland, but Ludwig II—known as the "fairytale king" for his love of plays, stories, and music—had far from a fairy-tale ending. In fact, he only lived in the still-unfinished castle for six months before his cabinet had him declared insane and replaced him. He died under mysterious circumstances, found drowned in waist-deep water, not long after.

You can learn more about the castle, and see some beautiful footage, in this video from Great Big Story.

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Pop Culture
Rare Disney Artifacts From Early Imagineer Rolly Crump Head to Auction

If you’ve ever marveled at the fantastical facades of Disney’s "It’s a Small World" attraction, you can partly thank Imagineer Rolly Crump. Throughout the 1960s, the animator and designer helped bring to life some of Walt Disney Parks’s most iconic attractions, including the "Enchanted Tiki Room," "Haunted Mansion," and "Adventureland Bazaar."

Later this month, some of his original pieces will go under the hammer at Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California. The most valuable of the 400-plus lots is Crump’s original model for a clock in "It’s a Small World," which could sell for up to $80,000, according to the auction house. The design was mocked up from fellow Disney artist Mary Blair’s original sketch, and the end result is now a permanent fixture of the boat ride attraction.

A few other items up for grabs are a Polynesian-style shield that Crump sculpted for the "Enchanted Tiki Room," an original devil prop from "Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride," an original "Haunted Mansion" poster, and a costumed character head from "Babes in Toyland." A ticket for the grand opening of Disneyland in 1955 is expected to sell for as much as $5000—although unfortunately it won't grant the buyer entry to the park these days.

In addition to pieces created for Disney, the collection also includes Crump’s original artwork, some of which dates back to his high school years. One such illustration of a colorful character wielding a sword and smoking a pipe was entered into a radio contest in 1947 by Crump’s mother, unbeknownst to her son. He didn’t win, but his consolation prize came five years later when he was hired to work at Walt Disney Studios at age 22.

The “Life and Career of Disney Legend Rolly Crump” auction is scheduled for April 28, 2018.

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