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Nike is Raffling Off Its Back to the Future Shoes

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Nike

For years, Nike teased the possibility of mass-producing the self-lacing shoes made famous by Michael J. Fox in 1989’s Back to the Future Part II. A replica shoe that was screen-accurate but didn’t self-lace was released in 2011; October 2015 saw Fox presented with a prototype that actually worked.

Now, fans of the series and sneakerheads are anxiously awaiting the pending release of the real thing. The good news? It’ll only cost you $10 to have a chance at owning a pair of the Nike Mags that were worn by Marty McFly. The bad news? It’s via a lottery system, and only 89 pairs are being made available.

Nike is currently accepting raffle entries through a digital storefront for the Mags, with all proceeds benefiting The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

The Draw, as the company calls it, began on Tuesday, October 4 and runs through October 11. Winners will be announced October 17, with exorbitant price gouging on eBay expected to commence moments later.

While it might seem like a paltry number of shoes, Nike probably realizes an entire line of space boot-looking sneakers aren’t for mass consumption. The adaptive fit technology that automatically sizes the sneaker for a custom fit is being eyed for the lucrative athletics market, with the Nike HyperAdapt 1.0 slated for release next month.

[h/t ABC]

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Target
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This Just In
Target Expands Its Clothing Options to Fit Kids With Special Needs
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Target

For kids with disabilities and their parents, shopping for clothing isn’t always as easy as picking out cute outfits. Comfort and adaptability often take precedence over style, but with new inclusive clothing options, Target wants to make it so families don’t have to choose one over the other.

As PopSugar reports, the adaptive apparel is part of Target’s existing Cat & Jack clothing line. The collection already includes items made without uncomfortable tags and seams for kids prone to sensory overload. The latest additions to the lineup will be geared toward wearers whose disabilities affect them physically.

Among the 40 new pieces are leggings, hoodies, t-shirts, bodysuits, and winter jackets. To make them easier to wear, Target added features like diaper openings for bigger children, zip-off sleeves, and hidden snap and zip seams near the back, front, and sides. With more ways to put the clothes on and take them off, the hope is that kids and parents will have a less stressful time getting ready in the morning than they would with conventionally tailored apparel.

The new clothing will retail for $5 to $40 when it debuts exclusively online on October 22. You can get a sneak peek at some of the items below.

Adaptive jacket from Target.
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Adaptive apparel from Target.

Adaptive apparel from Target.

Adaptive apparel from Target.

[h/t PopSugar]

All images courtesy of Target.

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Big Questions
Why Do Shorts Cost as Much as Pants?
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iStock

Shorts may feel nice and breezy on your legs on a warm summer’s day, but they’re not so gentle on your wallet. In general, a pair of shorts isn’t any cheaper than a pair of pants, despite one obviously using less fabric than the other. So what gives?

It turns out clothing retailers aren’t trying to rip you off; they’re just pricing shorts according to what it costs to produce them. Extra material does go into a full pair of pants but not as much as you may think. As Esquire explains, shorts that don’t fall past your knees may contain just a fifth less fabric than ankle-length trousers. This is because most of the cloth in these items is sewn into the top half.

Those same details that end up accounting for most of the material—flies, pockets, belt loops, waist bands—also require the most human labor to make. This is where the true cost of a garment is determined. The physical cotton in blue jeans accounts for just a small fraction of its price tag. Most of that money goes to pay the people stitching it together, and they put in roughly the same amount of time whether they’re working on a pair of boot cut jeans or some Daisy Dukes.

This price trend crops up across the fashion spectrum, but it’s most apparent in pants and shorts. For example, short-sleeved shirts cost roughly the same as long-sleeved shirts, but complicated stitching in shirt cuffs that you don’t see in pant legs can throw this dynamic off. There are also numerous invisible factors that make some shorts more expensive than nearly identical pairs, like where they were made, marketing costs, and the brand on the label. If that doesn’t make spending $40 on something that covers just a sliver of leg any easier to swallow, maybe check to see what you have in your closet before going on your next shopping spree.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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