17 Amazing Facts About He-Man (Powered by Grayskull)

DreamWorksTV
DreamWorksTV

In 1982, toy stores began to receive stock for a peculiar new line of action figures. With a hyper-muscular frame nearly as wide as he was tall and crouched in an attack stance, He-Man was a radical departure from the long and lean heroes of G.I. Joe or the puny dimensions of Luke Skywalker. Here was a burly swordsman whose story—defending Castle Grayskull from the demonic Skeletor—blended classic myth with spring-loaded punches that could knock other figures senseless.

He-Man made a respectable $38 million for Mattel in its first year. By 1984, it had earned over a billion. Though He-Mania was not engineered to last, it remains one of the biggest toy success stories of all time. If you’ve ever hoisted a sword (or a spatula) in the air and called upon the Power of Grayskull, you need to check out these 17 facts. Do it for Eternia.

1. He-Man Was a Result of Mattel Passing on Star Wars.

When George Lucas’ space opera went shopping for licensing partners, Mattel was one of several companies that passed on the rights to make action figures. The industry watched as Kenner turned Star Wars into a toy supernova, leaving Mattel to pick up the plastic pieces and eager to develop their own hit.

2. Mattel Had to Choose Between Three Very Different He-Men.

Mattel preliminary designer Roger Sweet and in-house illustrator Mark Taylor—who designed packaging for Barbie—both had ideas about a chiseled warrior who wielded swords in the Frank Frazetta mold. While Taylor’s sketches (some of which dated back to his childhood) were fantasy-based, Sweet envisioned a character who could be placed in any number of eras or genres. For a presentation to Mattel executives, Sweet applied clay muscles to an existing line of boy’s action figures. Each represented the character, which he named He-Man, in military, fantasy, and space settings. Despite the story possibilities of a time-traveling hero, Mattel's marketing research pointed to the guy with the pawn on his head. With Taylor’s sketches and ideas for supporting characters, a barbarian was born.   

3. He Was Originally a Viking.

The Power and the Honor Foundation

Based on sketches from Mark Taylor, sculptor Tony Guerrero initially fashioned He-Man as a stern-looking individual. But his scowling expression and horned helmet were deemed too menacing: he looked too angry to be played with. Before being softened up with a blonde haircut, the prototype was used in market research testing, and one kid was so enamored with the brute that he tried to stuff him in his winter coat. The would-be thief was caught, but not before Mattel realized they were on to something.

4. The Animated Series Was a Result of a Bad Meeting with Toys ‘R' Us.

Confident in their He-Man line-up, Mattel marketing director Mark Ellis showed their concept to buyers at Toys 'R’ Us. To help flesh out the back story and clarify who was good and bad, Mattel had commissioned a series of mini-comics to insert into product packaging. But TRU executives were not impressed, arguing that young children may not be willing or able to read. Improvising, Ellis said they had a one-hour cartoon special in the works. How hard could it be to get one made?

5. Everyone Turned Down the Cartoon.

After being rejected by Hanna-Barbera for the special, Mattel turned to a company that had produced an animated commercial for them: Filmation. The company behind Fat Albert was economical but savvy: After being turned down by CBS, NBC, and ABC for a Saturday morning slot, Filmation president Lou Scheimer suggested they produce a 65-episode first season they could syndicate for stations to run five days a week. The model was so successful that at the height of its popularity in 1984, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe was seen by more than nine million viewers every afternoon.

6. Castle Grayskull Was Built by a Giant.

Mentioned in reference documents but never explained onscreen, He-Man’s palatial turf was built by Tytus, a giant who fought in a massive battle centuries before the events of the cartoon series. Mattel later issued an action figure of the character that stood 12 inches tall.

7. When One Station Stopped Airing It, Kids Rioted.

KTXS-TV found out the hard way what happens when you deprive He-Man fans of their fix: anarchy. The Abilene, Texas station took the series off-air in the fall of 1985 owing to cooling ratings. When fans complained, the channel resumed airing it and tried to appease viewers by arranging for an appearance by a Mattel-endorsed actor. After 8000 rowdy kids engulfed him, organizers had to cut the event short. “He-Man left early because we became very concerned about the safety of the children,” KTXS owner S.M. Moore told the Lethbridge Herald.

8. Filmation Used Bodybuilders for Character References.

Models pose with Filmation employees. Image courtesy of Andy Mangels.

In order to animate He-Man’s impossibly-developed musculature, Filmation director Hal Sutherland scouted gyms and assembled a crew of bodybuilders so they could be filmed performing stunts as a reference. The photo above is most likely the only time you’ll see any version of the character sporting a mustache.   

9. The Slime Pit Really Upset Parents.

Despite never actually being seen in He-Man (though it did pop up in sister series She-Ra, Princess of Power), the Slime Pit was a popular toy torture chamber: unfortunate figures would get doused with some proprietary goop that was first marketed back in the 1970s. But as parents soon learned, the Slime packaged with the toy eventually ran out—and the only way to get more was to buy two more action figures. Consumers cried foul; retailers didn't help the situation, selling cans of free promotional Slime for $3 to $10 each.

10. There Was One Toy Filmation Refused to Animate.

Despite criticism that they were simply producing a half-hour toy commercial, Filmation retained the right to ignore suggestions from Mattel. When the toy company pitched Lou Scheimer on a prototype for an attack vehicle with a sphere that could pummel opponents, he flat-out refused. Filmation, he insisted, would never animate anything named the Ball Buster. Common sense prevailed and the toy was re-named the Bashasaurus.

11. There Was a Comic Strip.

Running from 1986 to 1991, a He-Man strip was syndicated so Mattel had a way of keeping the franchise visible after the cartoon (which ran for 130 episodes) wrapped production in 1985. Unfortunately, it only ran in 10 newspapers.

12. Dolph Lundgren Dubbed Himself.

The 1987 film Masters of the Universe was partially funded by Mattel after they realized they could co-finance a movie for only a portion of their advertising budget. Football star Howie Long was rumored to be in the running for the role, but producers ultimately went with a post-Rocky IV Dolph Lundgren. The actor was physically imposing, but his heavy Swedish accent made his lines hard to understand. Before he could be dubbed by another performer, Lundgren’s contract specified he could try re-recording up to three times. Eventually, his voice became intelligible—but it didn’t do the movie much good. With He-Man hysteria dying down, it made only $17 million in theaters.

13. Prince Adam Wasn’t Part of the Movie—or the Original Toys.

Though he existed in Mark Taylor's sketch art, He-Man’s royal alter ego wasn’t introduced into the canon until writer Michael Halperin brought the concept to the comics and cartoon story guide. (Instead of transforming into He-Man using his sword, he'd duck into a cave, Eternia's version of a phone booth.) Prior to that, the DC mini-comics portrayed the character as more of a tribal warrior without the need for a secret identity. He also failed to appear in the live-action film, though director Gary Goddard said a sequel might have introduced the prince.  

14. There Was Nearly a He-Ro, Son of He-Man Series.

See that radical dude surfing an alligator? That’s He-Ro, star of a proposed 1996 animated spin-off series. Prince Adam is a king and married to Teela; the couple adopts an orphan named Dare. After hoisting the Power Sword, the boy is transformed into a hero almost as buff as his dad. Though Mattel has updated the series twice, it never went forward with the He-Ro concept.        

15. There’s a Non-Profit Foundation to Preserve He-Man’s Legacy.

Toy packaging painting by artist Rudy Obrero. Image courtesy of The Power and the Honor Foundation.

Founded in 2010, the Power and the Honor Foundation is dedicated to preserving the work of artists who helped define the He-Man franchise. Original illustrations, toys, and documents from Mattel and Filmation are digitally scanned and stored for safekeeping. Want to make a donation? As a federally recognized charity, it would be tax-deductible.

16. In 1987, Sales Fell Off a Cliff ...

Theories abound as to why He-Man’s fortunes disintegrated, going from $350 million in 1985 to bottoming out by 1987. Competition from the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Transformers, and video games was heating up; Mattel had also flooded the market with second-tier character inventory that retailers couldn’t move fast enough.  

17. … But That Was After He Made Two Billion Dollars.

Roger Sweet once estimated that when sales of all He-Man products—toys, clothing, electric toothbrushes, sleeping bags—were tallied, the franchise brought in over $2 billion before the bubble burst. Not bad for a plastic guy who started out in a bad mood.    

Additional Sources: Mastering the Universe; The Art of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe; He-Man.org.

5 Clues Daenerys Targaryen Will Die in the Final Season of Game of Thrones

HBO
HBO

by Mason Segall

The final season of HBO's epic Game of Thrones is hovering on the horizon like a lazy sun and, at the end of the day, fans have only one real question about how it will end: Who will sit the Iron Throne? One of the major contenders is Daenerys of the thousand-and-one names, who not only has one of the most legitimate claims to the throne, but probably deserves it the most.

However, Game of Thrones has a habit of killing off main characters, particularly honorable ones, often in brutal and graphic ways. And unfortunately, there's already been some foreshadowing that writers will paint a target on Daenerys's back.

5. THE PROPHECIES

Carice van Houten in 'Game of Thrones'
Helen Sloan, HBO

What's a good fantasy story without a few prophecies hanging over people's heads? While the books the show is based on have a few more than usual, the main prophecy of Game of Thrones is Melisandre's rants about "the prince that was promised," basically her faith's version of a messiah.

Melisandre currently believes both Daenerys and Jon Snow somehow fulfill the prophecy, but her previous pick for the position died a grisly death, so maybe her endorsement isn't a good sign.

4. TYRION'S DEMANDS FOR A SUCCESSOR

Peter Dinklage and Emilia Clarke in a scene from 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

A particular scene in season seven saw Tyrion advising Daenerys to name a successor before she travels north to help Jon. She challenges him, "You want to know who sits on the Iron Throne after I'm dead. Is that it?" But that's exactly it. Tyrion is more than aware how mortal people are and wants to take precautions. He's seen enough monarchs die that he probably knows what warning signs to look for.

3. A FAMILY LEGACY

David Rintoul as the Mad King in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

Daenerys is the daughter of the Mad King Aerys II, a paranoid pyromaniac of a monarch. More than once, Daenerys has been compared to her father, particularly in her more ruthless moments. Aerys was killed because of his insanity and arrogance. If Daenerys starts displaying more of his mental illness, she might follow in his footsteps to the grave.

2. HER DRAGONS AREN'T INVINCIBLE

Emilia Clarke in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

The fall and subsequent resurrection of the dragon Viserion was one of the biggest surprises of season seven. Not only did it destroy one of Daenerys's trump cards, but it proved that her other two dragons were vulnerable as well. Since the three-headed dragon is the sigil of her house, this might be an omen that Daenerys is next on the chopping block.

1. THAT VISION

Emilia Clarke in 'Game of Thrones'
HBO

All the way back in season two, Daenerys received a vision in the House of the Undying of the great hall in King's Landing ransacked and covered in snow. Before she could even touch the iron throne, she was called away by her dragons and was confronted by her deceased husband and son. This is a clear indication that she might never sit the throne, something that would only happen if she were dead.

Highway Fidelity: When Cars Came With Record Players

Fox Photos/Getty Images
Fox Photos/Getty Images

In the winter of 1956, Chrysler unveiled a series of improvements to their lineup of automobiles. There was LifeGuard, a latch that prevented doors from flinging open in the event of an accident. New windshield wipers promised to clean 10 percent more of the glass surface than the previous year’s model. And for those consumers willing to spend an extra $200—the equivalent of about $1700 today—there was the Highway Hi-Fi, a factory-installed record player mounted under the car's dashboard.

Using an “elastic three-point suspension,” the unit played “non-breakable” 7-inch records. In advertising copy, Chrysler touted that the discs would never skip, not even during sharp turns or while crossing railroad tracks. “It’s almost impossible to jar the arm off the record,” the company promised, anticipating the dubious looks of dealers and buyers alike.

As it turned out, attempting to spin a record while in a moving vehicle was every bit as problematic as it might sound. But before 8-tracks, cassettes, CDs, and satellite radio, the Highway Hi-Fi represented the first opportunity for drivers to have some control over what they were listening to. They had autonomy—freedom to deviate from radio programmers, invasive ads, and boring talk shows.

Naturally, radio stations hated the idea.

A Chrysler car record player mounted under the dashboard
Courtesy FCA US

This bizarre automotive alteration was the result of an engineering genius who wanted to get his kid to shut up. Peter Goldmark was head of CBS Labs, a position which afforded him the resources to pursue other innovations. (He’s widely credited with ushering in the modern system of broadcasting color television.) He was the inventor of long-play (LP) records, which played vinyl at 33 and one-third revolutions per minute (RPM) instead of 78. Introduced in 1948, LPs revolutionized the music industry, packing more information onto the 12-inch discs by etching microgrooves into the vinyl and allowing producers to place up to 60 minutes of music on a side.

In the 1950s, Goldmark’s son observed that drivers had no influence over what was being broadcast via the transistor radios that had become standard in vehicles. While you could switch stations, you were still at the mercy of programming directors and their tastes in music.

As inventors tend to do, Goldmark identified the problem and then sought out a way to remedy it. His own creation, the LP, was far too big to have any practical application in a vehicle: The turntable would hang over a passenger’s knees. The 45 RPM record was much smaller but could only hold about five minutes of music on each side. Forcing someone to try and change records with such frequency while driving would likely result in accidents.

Goldmark devised a new option. Using a 7-inch record, he created a surface with ultra-microgrooves that played at 16 and two-thirds RPM. Each side could hold 45 minutes of music, a far more practical solution for people who couldn’t tend to the turntable easily. It also fit snugly under the dash, projecting out at the push of a button so the user could load a record and set the needle before pushing it back underneath and out of the way.

Goldmark made other adjustments. The vinyl records were thicker than standard LPs so they would be more heat-resistant during the summer months. He also developed a spring enclosure to absorb shocks and a counterweighted needle arm to make sure it wouldn’t leap off the record while traveling over bumps.

Goldmark tested it in a CBS executive’s Thunderbird. It worked flawlessly. He loved it.

CBS CEO William Paley hated it.

Paley equated the innovation to a form of self-sabotage. CBS had radio affiliates all around the country beaming their signals into millions of cars; those stations sold advertising spots to generate revenue. If drivers began listening to their own records instead of the radio, they were effectively diluting their own audiences. Paley thought sponsors would have a tantrum. He dismissed the idea entirely.

Perhaps feeling slightly petulant, Goldmark instead went directly to his potential customer: a car manufacturer. Visiting with Chrysler executive Lynn Townsend, Goldmark sold the company on the dashboard record player as a factory option. He rode along during a test drive, with Chrysler employees driving over bumps, railroad tracks, and other obstacles to see if the record skipped. It didn’t. The company ordered 18,000 Highway Hi-Fi units, a sizable investment that Paley couldn’t ignore.

CBS Labs mass-produced the devices, and Chrysler began instructing their dealers to pitch the add-on to prospective buyers. Each unit would come with six records, with the option to buy more through CBS-Columbia, a record label that manufactured the unique discs. Owing to Paley’s influence—he detested rock music—the choices were extremely placid. Car owners got the soundtrack to the Pajama Game Broadway musical, some Tchaikovsky, a jazz record, a dramatic reading of a George Bernard Shaw play, and songs from Disney’s Davy Crockett television series. (The latter was advertised to “help keep [kids] quiet.”) The catalog offered spoken-word reenactments of the Battle of Gettysburg.

Owing to their smaller grooves, the records couldn’t be played on conventional turntables. Given the selection, that was probably a blessing.

A print ad for a Chrysler car record player
Courtesy FCA US

The limited selection was one problem. The functionality of the Highway Hi-Fi was another. Goldmark had tested the device in a Thunderbird and in high-end Chrysler vehicles, but the company offered the machine in their economical Dodge and Plymouth models, which both had modest shock absorption. The records could and did skip, and the models were the source of several claims against the car’s warranty coverage. Local mechanics weren’t audiophiles and didn’t have the knowledge to make simple repairs. As word spread, Chrysler went from selling 3685 Hi-Fi units in 1956 to just 675 in 1957.

The option was discontinued shortly thereafter, but that wasn’t quite the end for car-mounted records. In 1960, RCA thought they had resolved some of the outstanding issues with their Victrola, which played 45s and overcame the short running time problem by constructing a 14-disc changer. When one record was finished, the unit would automatically drop another in its place. Similar to a jukebox, the needle was upside down and the record lowered on top of it to reduce skipping. Records slid into a slot in a manner similar to the CD players that were decades away.

The Victrola was picked up by Chrysler. It performed better than the Highway Hi-Fi, was cheaper ($51.75), and didn’t force users to limit themselves to the paltry selection of CBS’s custom discs. But it didn’t last long either; it was discontinued in 1961. (Another option, the UK’s Auto-Mignon, played 45s with manual switching: Each of the four Beatles was said to own one.) Before anyone could think to improve upon it further, 8-tracks arrived and soon became the portable car sound source of choice. CBS never followed through on plans to equip taxis, airplanes, buses, and other forms of transportation with their devices. In the evolution of on-demand music and auto transportation products, the Highway Hi-Fi was one step best skipped.

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