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Wells Fargo

The World's Loneliest ATM is in Antarctica

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Wells Fargo

Despite the frigid temperatures, ornery elephant seals, and months of perpetual darkness, Antarctica is still a place where money matters. That’s where Wells Fargo comes in.

The banking conglomerate installed an automatic teller machine (ATM) back in 1998 at McMurdo Station, the largest science hub on the continent. Depending on the season, McMurdo’s population ranges from 250 to more than 1000. And like any small community, commerce is crucial. In order to patronize the coffee shops, general stores, bars, or post office, money is exchanged in what amounts to a closed economy. Some places only accept cash; others have a credit card minimum that’s hard to meet when you need just a couple of items.

But what happens if there’s a malfunction at a time when flights in and out are scarce due to weather conditions?

According to Wells Fargo spokesperson Kristopher Dahl, the company trains McMurdo staff to make simple repairs; more importantly, there’s a second ATM that can be cannibalized for parts. “Every two years, both machines are serviced and brought up to speed on the latest technology,” he says. The vendors chosen for that job undergo a psychological exam and a physical to make sure they’re equipped to deal with the Antarctic climate in case they get held over.

While McMurdo is near New Zealand territory, the ATM only dispenses American currency. (Staffers can exchange money at Scott Base, which is about two miles away.) There is no such thing as the Antarctic dollar, though the Antarctica Overseas Exchange Office does produce “collectible” bills they’ll buy or sell for their face value until the faux-money expires.

Naturally, we wondered what the consequences would be if someone lost their mind and had the financial resources to max out their daily withdrawal limit until they depleted the ATM of its cash reserves, ruining the economy of an entire continent.

“That’s interesting,” Dahl says. “For security reasons, we can’t share how much cash is in the machine or other related information.” Anyone planning any type of foul play should take note: Dahl says that there’s a camera in the unit.   

[via Today I Learned]

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Stressed Out? Take a Soothing Virtual Tour of Antarctica
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iStock

Visiting Antarctica may be the ultimate escape from reality: Time zones don’t exist, there are more penguins than people, and its snow-covered tundras, peaks, and valleys are equal parts alien and majestic.

Looking to get away from it all but don't have the credentials to become a polar scientist? Take a virtual tour of Antarctica below, courtesy of National Geographic–spotlighted filmmakers Aliscia Young and Richard Sidey.

[h/t National Geographic]

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NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud
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As Predicted, a Massive Iceberg Just Broke Off in Antarctica
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NOAA Suomi-NPP/University of Oxford/Simon Proud

Well, it finally happened. As Mental Floss reported last week, the last few decades have seen dramatic changes to the Larsen ice shelf, most recently with a growing rift along the section called Larsen C threatening to entirely break off. This week, it finally split, creating an iceberg the size of Delaware. At more than a trillion tons, it's one of the largest icebergs ever recorded.

The sections called Larsen A and B collapsed in 1995 and 2002, respectively, effectively reshaping the coastline of the Antarctic Peninsula.

The Larsen C crack spread slowly—you might say glacially—at first. But by June 2017, it was cruising right along, widening at a pace of about 32 feet per day. Experts at Swansea University’s Project Midas, which monitors the ice shelf, predicted the break would come within "hours, days, or weeks."

It took about a week. New imagery from NASA’s Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite shows a distinct split in the ice shelf.

"The rift was barely visible in these data in recent weeks," Adrian Luckman of Swansea University told the BBC, "but the signature is so clear now that it must have opened considerably along its whole length."

The precise cause of the split remains to be seen. While climate change is responsible for melting sea ice around the world, experts say this particular break may have been inevitable.

"We know that rifts like this periodically propagate and cause large tabular icebergs to break from ice shelves, even in the absence of any climate-driven changes," Chris Borstad, of the University Centre in Svalbard, told the BBC. "I am working with a number of colleagues to design field experiments on Larsen C to answer this specific question (by measuring the properties of the Joerg suture zone directly). But until we get down there and take some more measurements, we can only speculate."

[h/t BBC]

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