Attention Remote Workers: Tulsa Will Pay You $10,000 to Move There

iStock.com/DenisTangneyJr
iStock.com/DenisTangneyJr

Work at home and need a change of scenery? Moving to Tulsa could net you some extra cash. A new program called Tulsa Remote is offering $10,000 to remote workers willing to move to Oklahoma’s second-largest city for a year or more.

To be considered, applicants must either be self-employed or work full-time for a business located outside of Tulsa County. Grant recipients will be given $2500 upfront to cover relocation fees. After that, they’ll receive $500 per month, plus $1500 at the end of the year.

In addition to a stipend, remote workers who move to Tulsa will receive discounted rent (to the tune of 33 percent off) and free utilities for the first three months. The offer applies to new, furnished apartments in the Tulsa Arts District. Participants will also be given a membership to a local coworking space (valued at $1800), and invites to various events in the community tailored to remote workers and entrepreneurs.

The program is sponsored by the City of Tulsa and the George Kaiser Family Foundation. Tulsa’s cost of living is low compared to other U.S. cities—the median cost of a home is $157,200—but some would like to bring a little more innovation to the Midwestern city. “We hope that this sparks more tech talent and gets entrepreneur-oriented people to make Tulsa their home and pursue their career further or ultimately start new businesses," Ken Levit, executive director of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, told Forbes. "It could diversify our workforce."

To apply, visit TulsaRemote.com. Applicants may be asked to participate in a video chat, and they’ll have the chance to visit Tulsa before accepting an offer

Not ready to move to Oklahoma? Tulsa isn't the only place looking to attract new residents. Vermont launched a similar program last May to attract remote workers from other states, and New Haven, Connecticut, recently began offering first-time homeowners in the city up to $80,000 in incentives to buy property there.

Meet the Two Women Who Give Prescription Drugs Their Generic Names

bong hyunjung/iStock via Getty Images
bong hyunjung/iStock via Getty Images

You don’t have to be a marketing professional or pharmacist to understand why certain drug brands chose their names. “DiaBeta” sounds like it would help those with diabetes (it does), and “Lopressor” must have something to do with low pressure (it lowers your blood pressure). But the reasons for drugs’ generic names—glyburide and metoprolol for the aforementioned, respectively—aren’t so obvious.

Maybe you assumed that the generic names are chosen through a highly scientific process, or at least devised by the scientists who first manufactured each drug. In reality, the generic names are invented by the two women who compose the United States Adopted Names program (USAN), reports David Lazarus for the Los Angeles Times.

Director Stephanie Shubat and her colleague Gail Karet operate out of Chicago, where they dream up names for about 200 drug applications each year. The five-person USAN council, which only meets biannually and mainly communicates by email, then votes on their ideas.

There is some structure to the naming process. Shubat and Karet come up with uniform “stems” that they use for groups of similar drugs, much like similar English words have prefixes, suffixes, or root words from Latin. Many are intuitive, like estrogen-related drugs containing “estr-” or derivatives of the steroid prednisone containing “pred-” [PDF].

Sometimes drug manufacturers will submit their own suggestions for the generic names, which is where it gets a little tricky, because USAN doesn’t want the generic name to sound too similar to the name-brand drug. If it does, it can cause problems when the patent expires and other generic drug manufacturers try to compete with the name-brand company. For example, the generic name for the arthritis drug Celebrex is celecoxib. Since they contain many of the same letters, consumers might end up continuing to search for “Celebrex” even after cheaper alternatives have hit the market. That name was devised in the 1990s—Shubat said they never would have approved the name today.

In the last 50 years, USAN and international naming associations have masterminded around 11,000 generic drug names. As you can imagine, it’s getting more difficult to come up with new ones—especially considering that Shubat and Karet steer clear of the letters W, K, H, J, and Y, which can be complicated for non-English speakers to pronounce. They also do their best to prevent drug names that could be offensive or distasteful in another language.

For inspiration, Shubat doesn’t always stick to science or etymology. “Sometimes I look at license plates,” she said. “Sometimes I borrow from the names of cats or dogs.”

[h/t Los Angeles Times]

Hotels.com Wants to Pay You $10,000 to Test Out Some of America’s Fanciest Hotel Pools

iStock/FTiare
iStock/FTiare

Getting paid to hang out by the pool all summer may sound like a job that's too good to be true. But popular hotel booking site Hotels.com is looking to hire one lucky "Poolhop" to do just that—and pay them $10,000 for their efforts.

According to the official job application, "The Poolhop’s responsibilities are simple; travel to some of the most incredible hotel pools across the country, sip on fruity drinks, snap some photos, sport a hotel robe, and report back to reward-loving Hotels.com fans."

Along with the $10,000 stipend, the Poolhop's perks will include paid airfare and accommodations at six hotels across the country, one year of Hotels.com Gold Rewards member status, and “eternal bragging rights.” The only serious requirements are that applicants be at least 21 years of age and a U.S. resident. They must also, of course, know how to swim.

Thrillist reports that the chosen hotels aren’t your average accommodations, either. The Poolhop will get to dive into luxury at Hawaii's Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, the Mondrian Los Angeles, the SLS Las Vegas, Colorado's Garden of the Gods Club and Resort, The William Vale Hotel in New York City, and Miami Beach's National Hotel.

“No one wants to be sitting at a desk all summer,” Katie Junod, general manager of the Hotels.com brand in North America, said. "There are so many incredible hotel pools to explore across the country, and we want to give travelers a first-hand look at the crème de la crème. And who better to live the hotel life than our very own Hotels.com Poolhop?”

The trip will take place during two weeks in August. All applications must be filled out and submitted by Tuesday, June 25th. And don't forget your sunscreen!

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