You're Probably Raking Leaves All Wrong

iStock.com/Zbynek Pospisil
iStock.com/Zbynek Pospisil

'Tis the season for viewing fall foliage, which means the less lovely season of raking dead leaves isn't far away. You may want to brush up on your raking technique, because apparently there's a wrong way to tidy up your lawn, according to The Spruce. Several wrong ways, in fact.

First, you'll want to check your toolshed to make sure that what you have in your possession is, in fact, a leaf rake. There are over a dozen different kinds of rakes suited to different tasks, and it's easy to mistakenly use the wrong kind. Leaf rakes are a little like lawn rakes, except they have plastic instead of metal tines—and yes, it makes a difference.

Fortunately, raking is one of those chores where procrastination is okay, and even encouraged. The Spruce suggests holding off on raking until almost all of the leaves have fallen. That way, you can do it all at once and save yourself the hassle. However, it is recommended that you occasionally use a mulching mower or lawn mower with a bag attachment to collect any leaves that drop early on in the season.

If you have a garden, The Washington Post suggests using a mower (with a bag) to shred the leaves, which can then used as mulch to nurture your flower beds or soil. And if you really loathe raking, just start a compost pile and let it break down naturally over the winter. Local wildlife that find their food in piles of leaves will thank you.

For everyone else, put your raking skills to the test on a dry, windless day. You should be raking "deeply and vigorously" so that you're scraping up lawn thatch (dead grass) in addition to leaves. WeatherBug recommends that you rake small amounts of leaves at a time, using a "medium-paced, quick sweeping motion." It's quicker than long sweeps, and less likely to tire you out. Keep your back straight, knees bent, and periodically switch up the position of your hands so that you're not putting pressure on just one area.

If this sounds a little like preparing for rigorous exercise, it's because raking leaves is moderate physical activity, according to experts. Be sure to wear gloves and long pants, and try to enjoy autumn while it lasts. After all, raking leaves is still better than shoveling snow.

[h/t The Spruce]

Want to Repurpose Old or Damaged Books? Turn Them Into DIY Wall Art

Svitlana Unuchko/iStock via Getty Images
Svitlana Unuchko/iStock via Getty Images

Many bibliophiles see their books as more than just reading material. Whether they're color-coded, stored backwards, or stacked around the house in teetering piles, books can double as decorations that add coziness and character to a space. This interior design trend spotted by Today pushes this concept to new heights by transforming old books into pieces of sprawling wall art.

Erin Kern, the Oklahoma designer behind the blog Cotton Stem, first had the idea to make books into DIY art in 2015. Her concept works with any books you have at home that you can bear to part with. Just grab a staple gun, secure the book covers to the wall you wish to embellish, and then use staples, glue, or tape to arrange the pages of the book however you like them. You can keep the book open to your favorite page or use some clever craft work to make the pages look like they're frozen mid-flip. As you expand the piece, you can add single pages or pages without their covers to vary the design.

Kern and other designers who've created their own versions of the project often combine old books with other types of wall decor. You can nestle framed prints of literary quotes or tuck air plants among the pages. Ana Ochoa of the blog Fiddle Leaf Interiors used hanging books as a makeshift canvas for a larger-than-life painting.

If seeing books stapled to a wall makes you cringe, rest assured that no one is suggesting you buy brand-new books to use as your crafting materials. This project is a great way to repurpose old books you never plan to read again—especially books with tears and missing pages that are too damaged to donate.

Looking for more literary design inspiration? Check out these pieces of furniture made out of books.


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[h/t Today]

No Plunger, No Problem: How to Unclog a Toilet Without a Plunger

djedzura/iStock via Getty Images
djedzura/iStock via Getty Images

When it comes to plumbing, the fear upon realizing your toilet just isn’t going to flush is second only to the fear of realizing that there’s no plunger in sight. Before you resort to a “Do Not Use” sign and an emergency trip to the hardware store, try one (or all) of these household life hacks for unclogging your toilet without a plunger, compiled by Reader’s Digest.

1. Dish Soap

Pour half a cup of dish soap into your toilet and let it sit in the bowl for a little while before trying to flush. Hopefully, it will sink down and coat the sides of the pipe enough to ease the passage of the clogged mass. If you’re down to your last drop of dish soap, you can cut a bar of soap into cubes and use those instead.

2. Hot Water

Pour a bucket of hot water into the toilet from waist-level (to prevent it from splashing the toilet bowl’s contents all over your bathroom and you), which could force the clogged mass through the pipe. You can combine this method with the soap method to maximize your chances of solving your problem; just make sure the water you use is not boiling, which could crack the porcelain.

3. A Wire Hanger

Grab a wire hanger from your closet and untwist it until you have one straight length of wire. Then, use it just like you would a drain snake: Stick it down into the pipe and poke the mass until it gets dislodged or broken up enough to continue through the pipe.

4. Baking Soda and Vinegar

Pour one cup of baking soda and two cups of vinegar into your toilet and let it sit for half an hour. It might unclog the pipe on its own, but feel free to pour in a bucket of hot water if it doesn’t.

5. A Plastic Bottle

If you felt like the wire hanger method was a little too hands-on for your comfort, you might not be keen on the plastic bottle trick—but it could be your ticket to a clog-free toilet. First, take as much water out of your toilet bowl as possible, and fill up a plastic bottle with warm water. After donning a pair of rubber gloves (or large plastic bags, in a pinch), plug the top of the bottle with your thumb, and place the bottle and your thumb at the mouth of the pipe. Then, remove your thumb and squeeze the bottle to propel the water, and hopefully the clogged mass, through the pipe.

[h/t Reader’s Digest]

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