How Waffle House Helps Measure the Severity of a Natural Disaster

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iStock

There are a lot of ways the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assesses and addresses the severity of a natural disaster. Meteorology can predict movement patterns, wind gusts, and precipitation. Resources are dispatched to areas hit hardest by torrential weather.

But when the agency needs an accurate, ground-level gauge for how a community is coping during a crisis, they turn to Waffle House.

Since 2004, FEMA has utilized what former administrator Craig Fugate called the “Waffle House Index.” Because the casual dining chain is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, tracking to see if a location is closed or working with limited supplies can help inform the agency as to whether affected areas are ailing or taking steps toward normalcy.

“If a Waffle House is closed because there's a disaster, it's bad,” Fugate told NPR in 2011. “We call it red. If they're open but have a limited menu, that's yellow ... If they're green, we're good, keep going. You haven't found the bad stuff yet.”

For FEMA, the ability to order a plate of smothered and covered hash browns is an important analytic. If a Waffle House is having trouble getting stock, then transportation has been interrupted. If the menu is limited, then it’s possible they have some utilities but not others. If its locations have locked their doors, inclement weather has taken over. The chain’s locations would normally stay open even in severe conditions to help first responders.

The company has opened a Waffle House Storm Center to gather data in anticipation of Hurricane Florence, a Category 2 storm expected to touch down in the Carolinas this week. But not all locations are taking a wait-and-see approach. One Waffle House in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina has already closed due to the looming threat, making it the first red dot on the Index.

[h/t CNN]

Amazing Timelapse Shows Florida Sky Turning Purple Following Hurricane Dorian

Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Photographs taken of Hurricane Dorian's massive eye and the damage it caused in the Bahamas paint a picture of what it was like to live through the historic storm. But some of the most stunning images to come out of the event were captured after the hurricane had passed. As KENS5 reports, the time-lapse video below shows the sky over Florida turning a unique shade of purple in the wake of Hurricane Dorian.

Dorian skimmed the east side of Florida earlier this week, causing power outages and some flooding. The worst of the storm was over by Wednesday night, but the ominous purple clouds it left behind may have sparked concern among some Florida residents.

A purple sky following a hurricane is the result of a perfectly natural occurrence called scattering. The sky was super-saturated after Dorian arrived, and the moisture in the atmosphere refracted the light of the setting sun. Normally, only the longest wavelengths of light on the color spectrum are visible through the clouds—that's why sunsets often appear gold, pink, and orange.

Violet is the shortest wavelength on the spectrum, which means it's almost never visible in the sky. But the air's high dew point Wednesday night, combined with the dense low-hanging clouds, created the perfect conditions for a rare purple sky.

Locals who've lived through a few hurricanes may have recognized the phenomenon; the same thing happened after Hurricane Michael hit Florida last year.

[h/t KENS5]

See What the Eye of Hurricane Dorian Looks Like From Space

NOAA, Getty Images
NOAA, Getty Images

Hurricane Dorian has already caused damage on the ground, leveling houses and killing at least five people in the Bahamas earlier this week. For people who haven't seen Dorian's power up close, these pictures captured from space put the magnitude of the storm into perspective.

As Live Science reports, the photographs below were taken by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano aboard the International Space Station. They show the hurricane swirling over the Atlantic, its massive eye in clear view.

The storm has grown even more intense since it was photographed from space. According to a tweet from Parmitano on September 1, the pictures show Dorian as a tropical storm. By the time the system reached the Bahamas on Monday, September 2, it had upgraded to Category 5 hurricane with winds exceeding 185 mph. Dorian has since weakened to a Category 3, but that's still strong enough to cause significant destruction if it makes landfall over the U.S.

After preparing for a direct hit all week, it looks as though the southern U.S. may be spared from the worst of the storm. Projections now show Dorian hugging the Atlantic coast, starting off the coast of Florida and skimming Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The hurricane is still likely to drive powerful winds and storm surges along the east coast, so local governments are urging residents to take any necessary precautions and be prepared to evacuate if the order is given.

[h/t Live Science]

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