A Pocket Watch From the Titanic Surfaces and Sells for $57,500

Heritage Auctions, HA.com
Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Married couple Sinai and Miriam Kantor boarded the R.M.S. Titanic in Southampton, England on April 10, 1912. The Russian immigrants planned to study dentistry and medicine in the Bronx. Just five days later, Miriam was being ushered on a lifeboat, prioritized in the ship's women and children first mandate as it began to sink into the ocean. She survived. Sinai's body was recovered later.

Like all of the casualties retrieved by ships, Sinai's was taken in and his personal effects recorded. In addition to money, a passport, a notebook, a telescope, and a corkscrew, there was a pocket watch. Over 100 years later, the timepiece has now become part of a Titanic collector's assortment of watches from the doomed ship's excursion.

The inside of the timepiece recovered from the 'Titanic' and put up for auction
Heritage Auctions, HA.com

Heritage Auctions recently held a memorabilia auction, with Sinai's watch among the offerings. John Miottel, owner of Miottel Museum, made the winning bid of $57,500 for the item, which measures three inches in diameter and features Hebrew letters to represent numerals. A back etching depicts Moses holding the Ten Commandments.

The watch, which was handed over to Miriam along with Sinai's other personal effects, remained in the family throughout the 20th century before being put up for auction by a descendant. Miottel plans on adding it to a timepiece collection on display at the San Francisco Bay Area museum's Ocean Liner section. Miottel also owns three other watches recovered from the disaster.

While expensive, it's by no means the most valuable item to be retrieved from the waters surrounding the sunken ship. In 2017, a violin owned by bandleader Wallace Hartley sold for $1.7 million.

[h/t Economic Times]

Remains of Late 19th-Century Shipwreck Found on Jersey Shore

iStock.com/Sierra Gaglione
iStock.com/Sierra Gaglione

The holiday season isn't usually associated with the beach, but nature has a funny way of delivering surprises no matter the time of year. The weekend before Christmas, the remains of an old ship stretching over 25 feet long were discovered at the southern area of Stone Harbor beach, according to nj.com.

Local historians believe the vessel is the D.H. Ingraham, a schooner that sank in 1886 during a voyage from Rockland, Maine, to Richmond, Virginia. Archives from the time recount that while the ship was delivering a cargo of lime, it caught fire. Thanks to station employees at the nearby Hereford Lighthouse, all five men aboard were rescued and given proper shelter for the next four days. The rescuers even received medals of honor from Congress, which are still on display inside the lighthouse, according to the Press of Atlantic City.

This is not the only shipwreck to have been discovered along the Jersey Shore; in 2014, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers found one while making repairs to the Barnegat Inlet jetty. (New Jersey has its own Historical Divers Association, and at one point its president, Dan Lieb, estimated that the state had up to 7000 shipwrecks off its coasts.)

To check out more coverage about shipwrecks, like this 48-foot find in Florida earlier this year, click here.

[h/t nj.com]

People Have Been Dining on Caviar Since the Stone Age

iStock.com/Lisovskaya
iStock.com/Lisovskaya

Millennia before caviar became a staple hors d'oeuvre at posh parties, it was eaten from clay pots by Stone Age humans. That's the takeaway of a new study published in the journal PLOS One. As Smithsonian reports, traces of cooked fish roe recovered from an archeological site in Germany show just how far back the history of the dish goes.

For the study, researchers from Germany conducted a protein analysis of charred food remains caked to the shards of an Stone Age clay cooking vessel. After isolating roughly 300 proteins and comparing them to that of boiled fresh fish roe and tissue, they were able to the identify the food scraps as carp roe, or eggs. The scientists write that the 4000 BCE-era hunter-gatherers likely cooked the fish roe in a pot of water or fish broth heated by embers, and covered the pot with leaves to contain the heat or add additional flavor.

The clay shards were recovered from Friesack 4 in Brandenburg, Germany, a Stone Age archaeological site that has revealed about 150,000 artifacts, including items crafted from antlers, wood, and bone, since it was discovered in the 1930s. In the same study, the researchers report that they also found remnants of bone-in pork on a vessel recovered from the same site.

Other archaeological digs have shown that some of the foods we think of as modern delicacies have been around for thousands of years, including cheese, salad dressing, and bone broth. The same goes for beverages: Recently a 13,000-year-old brewery was uncovered in the Middle East.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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