8 Things You Might Not Know About B.C.

Creators Syndicate
Creators Syndicate

Debuting in 1958, cartoonist Johnny Hart’s B.C. took a humorous view of Stone Age life that pre-dated The Flintstones by two years. Although Hart passed away in 2007, the strip continues daily, with Hart’s grandson Mason Mastroianni currently at the drawing board. For more on the misadventures of Hart’s cavemen, check out some facts about the strip’s origins, its controversies, and how it changed the face of one California college.

1. IT WAS ORIGINALLY CALLED SUCK EGG.

After getting encouragement from artist—and future collaborator on The Wizard of Id—Brant Parker in a high school art contest, Hart decided to become a freelance cartoonist. But after seeing Peanuts in print for the first time in the late 1950s, Hart realized that comic strips provided a sequential freedom that single-panel gag cartoons didn’t. Fond of caveman jokes, Hart began designing triangular-shaped characters who could juxtapose primal life with modern day observations. He decided to call it Suck Egg based on an egg joke in an early strip; recalling his wife, Bobby, talked him out of it, the strip was later titled B.C. after one of its lead characters.

2. HART HAD A JOKE-GENERATING STRATEGY.

For the anachronistic punchlines in B.C.—his cavemen had concerns over technology, romance, and religion—Hart enlisted two of his friends, Jack Caprio and Dick Boland, for joke-writing sessions. Hart liked to focus on one concept, like books or jobs, and then write down every word he could think of that was associated with the idea, hoping to turn one or more of them into puns. 

3. HE DREW VERY QUICKLY.

While some cartoonists can take a full day to pencil and ink a strip, Hart preferred to expedite the process. Although writing jokes could resemble a marathon, executing them in panels was a sprint. Aided in some measure by the stylized, spare style of B.C., Hart could draw a week’s worth of strips in a matter of hours.

4. THE CHARACTERS WERE PATTERNED AFTER HIS FRIENDS.

Trying to assign distinct personalities to the cast of B.C., Hart took his wife’s suggestion that he use his friends as inspiration. Working as an art director for GE at the time, Hart created Thor after co-worker Thornton Kinney; Clumsy Carp was the nickname of a childhood friend; the one-legged Wiley was modeled after his brother-in-law, who had lost his leg in World War II. Wiley was an avid athlete, so Hart made him captain of the (prehistoric) sports teams.

5. HART ENDORSED DR PEPPER.

In 1963 and 1964, Hart agreed to design some original characters to accompany print ads for the Dr Pepper soft drink. After drafting a caveman named Harmon—who could eat bottles and extract the caps—he used him as inspiration for the monosyllabic Grog in the B.C. strip. The campaign also involved a 1966 television commercial featuring an animated interlude.

6. SOME NEWSPAPERS DROPPED THE STRIP OVER ITS RELIGIOUS CONTENT.

In the 1980s, Hart experienced a religious conversion, embracing Christianity and using B.C. as a pulpit for expressing his faith. At times, he would use overt Christian symbolism that alienated readers who believed comic strips should be nondenominational. Several newspapers dropped the strip, including the Chicago Sun-Times. Others, like The Washington Post, opted not to run the Sunday installments, which focused more on theology. Following a 2001 strip that depicted a menorah transforming into a cross, some readers took it as Hart implying Christianity was superior to Judaism. In a press release, Hart apologized if the cartoon caused any offense.

7. IT WAS ADAPTED INTO ANIMATION.

Hart’s first involvement in animation, B.C.: The First Thanksgiving, aired on NBC in 1973: The characters go in search of a turkey without actually knowing what one looks like. Preceding Hart’s future focus on religion, B.C. was also adapted into an animated Christmas short for HBO, B.C.: A Special Christmas, in 1981.  

8. IT INSPIRED A COLLEGE SPORTS MASCOT.

Like Snoopy, the personable anteater of B.C. became an early breakout animal character that helped draw attention to the strip. It also inspired a movement at UC Irvine, which had settled on an anteater mascot in 1965 and proceeded to use Hart’s drawings (with Hart’s permission) as the basis for their graphic design. “Peter the Anteater” appears as bronze statues and personal accessories like key chains on campus.

James Cameron Directed Entourage's Aquaman, But He Could Never Direct the Real One

Tommaso Boddi, Getty Images for AMC
Tommaso Boddi, Getty Images for AMC

Oscar-winning director James Cameron is no stranger to CGI. With movies like Avatar under his belt, you’d expect Cameron to find a particular sort of enjoyment in special effects-heavy movies like James Wan's Aquaman. But Cameron—who directed the fictional version of Aquaman featuring fictional movie star Vinnie Chase in the very real HBO series Entourage—has a little trouble with suspension of disbelief.

In a recent interview with Yahoo!, Cameron said that while he did enjoy Aquaman, he would never have been able to direct the movie itself because of its lack of realism.

"I think it’s great fun,” Cameron said. “I never could have made that film, because it requires this kind of total dreamlike disconnection from any sense of physics or reality. People just kind of zoom around underwater, because they propel themselves mentally, I guess, I don’t know. But it’s cool! You buy it on its own terms.”

"I’ve spent thousands of hours underwater," the Titanic director went on to say. "While I can enjoy that film, I don’t resonate with it because it doesn’t look real.”

While Aquaman was shot on a soundstage, Cameron will be employing state-of-the-art technology that will allow him to actually be underwater while shooting underwater scenes for his upcoming Avatar sequels.

[h/t Yahoo!]

New Avengers Fan Theory Suggests Doctor Strange Was Stuck in a 5000-Year Time Loop

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

With Avengers: Infinity War being one of the most complicated films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe so far, it's to be expected that—nearly a year after its original release—fans are still rabidly analyzing each and every scene to come up with plausible theories for hidden storylines. One Redditor did just that and realized something potentially major.

CleverD3vil took to Reddit to share his discoveries after analyzing one of Doctor Strange’s most memorable scenes in Infinity War. The scene in question, as fans will remember, sees Strange look forward in time 14,000,605 times, in order to find every possible scenario in which the Avengers face off against Thanos. Benedict Cumberbatch’s character then tells Iron Man that there is only one future where the heroes win.

CleverD3vil theorized that if Strange were to watch every possible scenario, he would have—at the very least—had to watch all of the events that went down in Infinity War. If you take the movie's three-hour runtime and multiply it by that 14,000,605 number, that would give Strange more than 42 million hours of scenarios to review. Since there are 8760 hours in a year, that would mean that Strange spent roughly 4795 years just viewing the possible outcomes. (The fan rounded that total up to 5000 on Reddit.) That's a lot of years, and a lot of time for Doctor Strange to work out how to best use his powers to help fight Thanos.

"In those 5000 years, [Strange] would have learned a sh** ton of things," the Redditor writes, "and this is how he could even put up a fight with Thanos with different kind of powers and [e]specially without the stone."

Although Doctor Strange ultimately disintegrates at the hands of Thanos’s snap in Infinity War, we’re assuming we’ll see him again come Avengers: Endgame. If this theorist is onto something, perhaps Strange could be ready to use his powers once more in the next inevitable battle against the Mad Titan.

Avengers: Endgame hits theaters on April 26, 2019.

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