A New Edition of Monopoly Encourages You to Scam Everyone

Hasbro
Hasbro

Anyone who has played Hasbro’s Monopoly knows that it's easy to be victimized by unscrupulous players. People can and will swipe money from the bank, move forward or behind one space to land on a more favorable square, or outright lie about the rules to someone unfamiliar with the game.

Previously, such actions might make you reconsider your friendships. Now, you may have to go to the same extremes just to stay competitive. According to Insider, Hasbro's newest version of the game, Monopoly: Cheaters Edition, actually rewards unethical behavior.

The Cheaters Edition game board will look similar to classic Monopoly, with one significant change: Five “cheat cards” will be in play during each game. These cards are designed to encourage players to undermine each other through deceptive tricks like quietly adding hotels without paying, stealing currency, and collecting rent on another person’s property.

The board and cards for 'Monopoly: Cheaters Edition'
Hasbro

And there’s one other significant change: This version of the game doesn't have a designated banker, making the redistribution of your illicit funds that much easier.

If you succeed at pulling off a cheat unnoticed, you'll be rewarded with extra cash or property. But there are consequences if you get caught—including being forced to wear a plastic handcuff affixed to the game board.

According to Jonathan Berkowitz, senior vice president of marketing at Hasbro, the new edition was inspired by surveys of players who admitted to dishonest game strategies.

"A recent study conducted by Hasbro revealed that nearly half of game players attempt to cheat during Monopoly games,” Berkowitz told Insider. “So in 2018, we decided it was time to give fans what they've been craving all along—a Monopoly game that actually encourages cheating.”

Monopoly: Cheaters Edition is due out this fall and will retail for $19.99.

[h/t Insider]

Online Daters Tend to Be Interested in Partners 25 Percent More Desirable Than They Are

iStock
iStock

Online dating may not bring out the best in people (as anyone who’s been ghosted can attest) but it does bring out our optimistic side. A new study suggests that people tend to reach out to fellow online daters who are approximately 25 percent more attractive than they are, according to The Washington Post.

The study, published in the journal Science Advances, looked at online dating messaging behavior from heterosexual men and women in four different U.S. cities. Researchers analyzed how many messages people sent and received in January 2014, how long those messages were, and how many messages went unanswered.

They examined daters in New York City, Chicago, Seattle, and Boston, including age, ethnicity, and education of the users in their analysis, but kept the profiles anonymous and did not read the messages themselves. (The researchers don’t name the particular site they got their data from, merely describing it as a “popular, free online dating service.” From the details, it sounds a lot like OkCupid or a very similar site: one that allows users to answer open-ended essay questions and list attributes like their religion and body type on their profiles.)

To quantify how desirable a person was, the researchers looked at the hard numbers—how many messages someone received, and how the senders themselves ranked on the desirability scale.

Both men and women tend to aim high, messaging someone more desirable than themselves by about 25 percent, on average. For the most part, users didn’t contact people who ranked lower than themselves on the desirability scale. When they did contact people who were hotter, daters tended to write much longer messages than they did when they contacted someone on their own level, so to speak—sometimes up to twice as long. Women tended to use more "positive" words (like "good" and "happy") when they were writing to hotter dudes, while men actually used fewer positive words when talking to hotter ladies. Men in Seattle sent the longest messages, perhaps because of the city’s makeup—in some populations, there are twice as many men there as women, so heterosexual men face a lot of competition. Although wordy messages in Seattle did have a slightly higher response rate, in other cities, the extra time spent typing out missives didn’t pay off. Given that those messages weren’t any likelier to get a response than a short note, the researchers write that the “effort put into writing longer or more positive messages may be wasted.”

The data also showed how desirability in online dating can be influenced by attributes like age, education level, and ethnicity. For instance, at least as far as averages go, older men tended to be viewed as more desirable than younger men until they hit 50. Women’s scores peaked when they were 18 years old (the youngest age when you can join the site) and decreased until age 60.

Even if you aren’t in the pool of the most attractive users, sometimes, aiming high can pay off. “Even though the response rate is low, our analysis shows that 21 percent of people who engage in this aspirational behavior do get replies from a mate who is out of their league, so perseverance pays off,” co-author Elizabeth Bruch explained in a press release.

[h/t The Washington Post]

How to Rig Your Android Phone to Play Old Floppy Disk Games

iStock
iStock

Owning a smartphone means you have thousands of games at your fingertips, but capturing the nostalgia of playing a game saved on a floppy disk isn't as simple as downloading an app. Reviving floppy disk games for the smartphone era is a bit more complicated, and YouTube vintage video game reviewer LGR shows you just how to do it step by step.

In this video, spotted by Kotaku, LGR takes an old floppy disk, the same kind you used in your computer class at school, and uses it to play a classic video game on a smartphone. This is made possible with an Android phone, a USB connector, an Android USB adaptor, and a portable floppy disk drive that's about as big as the phone itself. (The hardware doesn't work for iPhones, but if you're an Apple user there are plenty of ways to play old PC games online).

Just inserting the disk into the drive when it's connected to your phone isn't enough to start playing: You need to download a special app that mimics Microsoft's old disk operating system, like Magic Dosbox, for example. Once you have that on your phone, you can use it to open whatever game is saved to your floppy disk.

Because old PC games weren't made for touchscreens, the smartphone gameplay can be a little be a little awkward—but if you're willing to hook a floppy disk drive up to your phone, convenience likely isn't your goal. You can watch LGR's full instructions in the video below.

[h/t Kotaku]

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