Why Does My Shower Curtain Liner Attack Me?

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iStock

For most of us, showers are a time to block out external stimuli and enjoy a moment to ourselves. The blissful monotony can often lead to creative inspiration or new ideas. Celebrated screenwriter Aaron Sorkin once said he takes up to six showers a day to help unblock his mind and resolve story problems.

But not all showers can make us part of the wealthy Hollywood elite. Some showers can become exercises in dread and frustration. We’re referring to the persistent attack of the shower curtain liner.

Liners have a tendency to billow inward during showers, enveloping themselves around our calves and forcing us to swat them away. As problems, go, it’s fairly innocuous. But that doesn’t mean science hasn’t tried to understand the physics behind the phenomenon.

Back in 1938, Popular Science theorized that liners were behaving badly as a result of air currents. When hot air from the warm water rises, cold air around the tub seeks to replace it, causing the liner—which is in between—to grow agitated. This explanation seemed to satisfy people for a while, until someone pointed out that the liners tend to move even during a cold shower.

Others believed the liner was acting as a result of Bernoulli's principle, which states that air pressure around fluid decreases when the fluid is moving quickly. With a difference in air pressure inside and outside the tub, the liner will move.

In 2001, someone finally had the means and motivation to examine this theory more closely. David Schmidt, an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, used computer software developed to examine fluid spray to assist in diesel and aircraft engines to put Bernoulli's theory to the test. This being 2001, it took his home PC two weeks to run the simulation, which Schmidt programmed to replicate a typical shower (rod, curtain, liner, shower head).

Schmidt found that the shower spray created a vortex with a low-pressure region—a little like the center of a cyclone. That region is what “sucks” the liner inward. Despite the relative calm of a shower, the simulation indicated that you’re basically in the eye of a very low-level storm.

For more answers, Schmidt would probably have to consider overseeing a real-world model, but he said he doesn’t have the time or inclination to take the whole shower cyclone science thing to the next level.

That’s not quite the end of the story, though. In 2007, physics author Peter Eastwell tinkered with a shower set-up and noted that the cyclone effect was more pronounced in hotter than cooler water, and that factors like the distance of the liner from the spray affected the liner’s movement.

Clearly, more work needs to be done on this important issue. Until then, using a heavier liner or attaching weights to the bottom can prevent billowing. Alternately, you could just install a shower door. Aaron Sorkin probably has one.

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Why Are There 10 Hot Dogs to a Pack But Only 8 Buns?

tacar/iStock via Getty Images
tacar/iStock via Getty Images

Watching competitive eating champion Joey Chestnut cram dozens of hot dogs down his throat would make anyone crave a grilled log of processed meat this summer. But shopping for hot dogs can be a confusing experience. The dogs are typically sold in packs of 10, but the buns are sold in packs of eight. What's behind this strange dog and bun inequality?

According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council—yes, there is a National Hot Dog and Sausage Council—there’s a good reason for the discrepancy. For starters, distributors of hot dogs are almost always different from manufacturers of baked goods like rolls. The hot dogs are sold in packs of 10 because producers of meat (or meat-like) products selected that quantity when hot dogs started to sell at retail grocery stores in the 1940s. Oscar Mayer, which led the charge into direct-to-consumer hot dog packaging, sold hot dogs by the pound in accordance with how meat is typically priced. Having 10 dogs that weighed 1.6 ounces each seemed like the ideal distribution of weight.

Bakeries, meanwhile, have standards of their own. Buns and sandwich rolls are usually sold eight to a pack because the baking trays for the elongated buns are typically sized to fit that number. Two sets of four buns come off the tray, which is the reason why buns are often still attached to one another when you open a bag.

These standards were created independently of one another: Bakeries weren’t too preoccupied with hot dogs when they were settling on a four-roll tray standard, and hot dog manufacturers weren’t thinking about how difficult it would be for bakeries to break from their conveyor system to offer 10 buns to a pack.

It can be frustrating if you buy just one or two packages of each, but if you’re hosting a big enough party, the uneven number doesn’t matter. You just need to buy five packages of buns and four packages of hot dogs to have 40 matching pairs. No complicated calculations required.

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When Are the Dog Days of Summer?

Dorottya_Mathe/iStock via Getty Images
Dorottya_Mathe/iStock via Getty Images

The official “dog days” of summer begin on July 3 and end on August 11. So how did this time frame earn its canine nickname? It turns out the phrase has nothing to do with the poor pooches who are forever seeking shade in the July heat, and everything to do with the nighttime sky.

Sirius, the Dog Star, is the brightest star in the sky. The ancient Greeks noticed that in the summer months, Sirius rose and set with the Sun, and they theorized that it was the bright, glowing Dog Star that was adding extra heat to the Earth in July and August.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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