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Care+Wear

This Fashion-Friendly Hospital Gown Will Preserve Your Modesty

Care+Wear
Care+Wear

As anyone who has ever spent time on a physician's examination table knows, there's something slightly dehumanizing about a hospital gown. Often made with flimsy material that hangs off the body and designed to easily admit probing hands, it can make patients feel vulnerable.

In a New York Times article, reporter Valeriya Safronova writes that help may be on the way. Students at the Parsons School of Design in New York are teaming with medical wearables retailer Care+Wear to offer the Patient Gown, a more comfortable, conservative, and appealing alternative to the standard-issue medical shroud.

Features of the Patient Gown are displayed
Care+Wear

The students solicited feedback from medical professionals as well as patients enduring longer hospital stays to discover what design elements were necessary. They settled on a kimono-inspired cut that combines five different types of gowns and includes access for bariatric, IV, maternity, and other special-needs admissions. Using a combination of plastic snaps, ties, and a wrap fit, patients can keep relatively bundled up while doctors go about their business. There’s even a pocket to secure cell phones or other personal items that would normally be left on a table.

Currently, Care+Wear is helping to conduct a trial rollout of the gown at Montgomery Medical Center in Olney, Maryland. If successful, it could expand regionally, and ultimately to other medical facilities around the country.

[h/t The New York Times]

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Scientists May Have Pinpointed How Much Exercise Your Heart Needs to Stay Healthy
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There’s really no limit to the benefits of exercise, from cognitive improvement to increased cardiovascular capacity to more energy. But one of the biggest reasons to maintain a fitness regimen is to ward off chronic conditions. For example, exercise helps keep arteries from stiffening as we age, which lowers our risk of heart disease.

"Get some exercise," however, isn't exactly specific advice. Is twice a week good enough? Three times a week? Five? And for how long each time?

Researchers in Dallas, Texas may have found an answer. According to Newsweek, a study by staff at the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine and area hospitals looked at 102 people, aged 60 and over, who self-identified as either sedentary, casual, committed, or master-level exercisers. They worked out anywhere from almost never to daily. The researchers found that casual exercise (two to three times weekly, 30 minutes each session) was associated with keeping the mid-sized arteries, like those found in the head and neck, from aging prematurely. But four to five sessions per week helped stabilize the larger central arteries, which send blood to the chest and abdomen. The research was published in the Journal of Physiology.

The study did not look at the type of exercise performed or other lifestyle choices that may have affected the participants' arterial health. But when it comes to moving your body to keep your arteries limber, it seems safe to say that more is better.

[h/t Newsweek]

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Health
The First Shot to Stop Chronic Migraines Just Secured FDA Approval
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Migraine sufferers unhappy with current treatments will soon have a new option to consider. Aimovig, a monthly shot, just received approval from the Food and Drug Administration and is now eligible for sale, CBS News reports. The shot is the first FDA-approved drug of its kind designed to stop migraines before they start and prevent them over the long term.

As Mental Floss reported back in February before the drug was cleared, the new therapy is designed to tackle a key component of migraine pain. Past studies have shown that levels of a protein called calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) spike in chronic sufferers when they're experiencing the splitting headaches. In clinical trials, patients injected with the CGRP-blocking medicine in Aimovig saw their monthly migraine episodes cut in half (from eight a month to just four). Some subjects reported no migraines at all in the month after receiving the shot.

Researchers have only recently begun to untangle the mysteries of chronic migraine treatment. Until this point, some of the best options patients had were medications that weren't even developed to treat the condition, like antidepressants, epilepsy drugs, and Botox. In addition to yielding spotty results, many of these treatments also come with severe side effects. The most serious side effects observed in the Aimovig studies were colds and respiratory infections.

Monthly Aimovig shots will cost $6900 a year without insurance. Now that the drug has been approved, a flood of competitors will likely follow: This year alone, three similar shots are expected to receive FDA clearance.

[h/t CBS News]

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