10 Adorable Facts About Cabbage Patch Kids

Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images
Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

Although there have been other toy crazes throughout the 20th century, none have inspired the frenzy that met the 1983 debut of the Cabbage Patch Kids. Mass-produced yet all slightly unique—each was computer-sorted to have a distinctive combination of hair, freckles, and expressions—the dolls were in such high demand that shoppers risked bodily injury to try and grab one: In 1983, a Wall Street Journal editorial asserted that more Americans were worried about obtaining a Kid than the possibility of nuclear annihilation at the height of the Cold War. Check out 10 facts behind this dimpled phenomenon.

1. THEY WERE ORIGINALLY CALLED “LITTLE PEOPLE.”

When Appalachian artist Xavier Roberts began handcrafting a line of soft-sculpture babies in Georgia in 1977, he referred to them as Little People and created an elaborate marketing plan around their distribution. Gift shops and other retailers would never “sell” the creations—instead, they were to be “adopted.” Roberts also corrected anyone who referred to them as “dolls,” preferring to call them “babies” or “kids.” The fantasy worked, and Roberts sold well over 200,000 of his Little People before signing a deal to mass-produce them in partnership with toymaker Coleco in 1982. Under the direction of advertising agent Roger Schlaifer, they were rebranded as Cabbage Patch Kids after the stock explanation parents sometimes use to describe reproduction—that kids come from “the cabbage patch.”

2. PEOPLE GOT TRAMPLED TRYING TO BUY THEM.

It’s hard to pinpoint the exact appeal of the Cabbage Patch Kids, which were perceived by some as homely. Some psychologists interviewed at the time believed that the adoption fantasy appealed to children who were looking to be caregivers themselves, while others pointed to the idea that parents could “prove” their worth by securing a Kid for their offspring. Whatever the case, the 1983 holiday shopping season drove consumers into a frenzy. Stores receiving small quantities of the Kids saw shoppers stampede into stores, suffering broken bones, being trampled, and even attempting to bribe employees into reserving them before they hit the sales floor. One manager resorted to wielding a baseball bat as a form of crowd control.

3. XAVIER ROBERTS MADE ONE KID CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD.

As president of Original Appalachian Artworks (OAA), the company incorporated to produce the dolls in 1978, the colorful Roberts enjoyed perpetuating the fantasy of the Kids as actual personalities. One of his earlier creations, Otis Lee, was named Chairman of the Board and frequently traveled with Roberts, rarely leaving his side.

4. ONE DESPERATE PARENT FLEW TO LONDON TO GRAB A KID.

A vintage photo of a child receiving a Cabbage Patch Kid
Dennis Harper, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Frustrated with the lack of supply in North America, a Kansas City mailman named Ed Pennington flew to London during the 1983 season in order to pick up a Kid for his daughter, Leana. (In England, demand wasn’t quite as strong and few had to risk bodily injury to secure one.) Pennington bought five of the Kids and gave four of them away to charity.

5. COLECO HAD TO PULL ITS ADVERTISING.

With demand for the Kids prompting violence, Coleco was chastised by consumer advocates for a form of “false advertising,” running television commercials that attracted consumers when they knew they would be unable to produce enough supply. James Picken, the consumer affairs commissioner in Nassau County, New York, complained the ads amounted to “harassing small children.” The company soon backed off on their ad campaign, pulling TV spots. It was hardly a problem, though: The furor over the Kids brought them headlines—and free advertising—virtually around the clock.

6. ADOPTION GROUPS WEREN’T BIG FANS.

A child examines two Cabbage Patch Kid toys
alamosbasement, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The marketing for the Kids, which involved an “oath” to treat them with care along with a birth certificate and adoption papers, spoke to adolescent consumers but didn’t find support in the actual adoption community. Feeling the toy trivialized actual adoptive parents and their kids, adoption groups spoke out against the idea, fearing it would prompt children to believe people could be “bought.”

7. THERE WAS AN EASY WAY TO SMELL A FAKE.

With any consumer product sensation comes a parade of counterfeit merchandise, and the Kids were no exception. Consumer advocate groups pointed out that bogus Cabbage Patch items possessed an oily smell due to the industrial rags they had been stuffed with. Thought to be highly flammable, consumers were told to avoid Kids that reeked of kerosene.  

8. THEY SUED THE GARBAGE PAIL KIDS.

A Cabbage Patch Kid sits on top of a dumpster
Al Pavangkanan, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Roberts and OAA didn’t find a lot to laugh about when Topps released their line of Garbage Pail Kids trading cards in 1985. Featuring the same rounded heads and cute expressions as the Cabbage Patch Kids, OAA charged that the booger-infested cards were infringing on their copyright. After a court battle, Topps agreed to alter the design of their cards.

9. ONE MODEL HAD TO BE RECALLED FOR EATING THEIR OWNERS' HAIR.

Cabbage Patch mania was on full display through 1984, when Coleco sold 20 million of the toys before demand finally began to wane. In an effort to bolster sales later in the decade, new Cabbage Patch licensee Mattel released Snack Time Kids, which were intended to gobble up fake French fries. Instead, the mechanism could bite down on their owner’s long hair and automatically begin chewing. After complaints—and one 911 call for a child in Connecticut unable to free herself from the Kid’s maw—Mattel offered refunds and withdrew the toy from stores.

10. THEY INSPIRED A MORBID URBAN LEGEND.

A set of Cabbage Patch Kids wearing hats
lisaclarke, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Cabbage Patch Kids that had suffered indignities like dog maulings, sibling amputations, or other misadventures could potentially be repaired by doll hospitals. But one morbid rumor sprang up in newspapers: if your Kid was beyond repair, Coleco would issue the toy a death certificate.  

South Dakota’s Flintstones Theme Park Has Been Demolished

Tbennert, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0 (cropped)
Tbennert, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0 (cropped)

Fans of The Flintstones have said their final goodbyes to Bamm-Bamm, Fred, Pebbles, and other longtime residents of South Dakota's Bedrock City. As the local NewsCenter1 station reports, the quirky roadside attraction in the city of Custer—which closed down in 2015—has now been bulldozed.

Located about 40 miles from Rapid City in South Dakota's Black Hills, the attraction was the first Flintstones-themed park to open, in 1966. It featured a "Mt. Rockmore" structure, a 20-foot Dino statue, Fred's Flintmobile car, and other replicas of the houses and characters made famous by the cartoon. Now, all that remains are the memories shared by the many families who visited the roadside attraction over the years.

There's some good news, though. Visitors will have one last chance to visit Bedrock City's sister location in Arizona, located along Route 64 near the Grand Canyon. "We have been making needed repairs and will open the campground soon," a representative of Raptor Ranch, a new attraction slated to take over the Bedrock City site, tells Mental Floss. "We are closed now, but will open soon. This will likely be the last year to see the Bedrock buildings before the remodel."

The Arizona Bedrock City shut down in January after 47 years of operations. The new owner, Troy Morris, announced plans to convert the property into a park where visitors can learn about birds of prey and watch flight demonstrations. The upcoming attraction's Facebook page shared photos of the progress, while also attempting to find future homes for the Flintstones crew.

The date of the Bedrock City campground's reopening is yet to be announced, but keep checking the Raptor Ranch Facebook page for updates.

[h/t NewsCenter1]

Bran Reveals Meaning of the Three-Eyed Raven and How That Impacts Future of Westeros

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Earlier this year, Night King actor Vladimir Furdik confirmed that his Game of Thrones character "has a target he wants to kill," and it appears that last night's episode, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," may have revealed who that person is: Bran Stark, who is now the Three-Eyed Raven. In a meeting before the dead march on Winterfell, Bran says, “He’ll come for me. He’s tried before. Many times, with many Three-eyed Ravens.”

When explaining why it's him the Night King wants, Bran revealed what the Three-Eyed Raven does, and what his death would mean for Westeros.

According to Bran, the Night King's goal is "An endless night. He wants to erase this world." Bran goes on to say, "I am its memory," referring to the fact that he, as the Three-Eyed Raven, knows everything that has happened in the history of Westeros. To this, Sam Tarly replies, "Memories don’t come from books. And your stories aren’t just stories. If I wanted to erase the world of men, I’d start with you.”

The Night King was able to get his hands on Bran in a vision, and Bran is permanently marked from the encounter, which means the Night King always knows where he is. Now, Bran—guarded by Theon—will serve as bait to lure the Night King into Winterfell.

Could this be foreshadowing the fact that Bran won't see the end of the season? We'll just have to wait and see what's coming in episode three and beyond.

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