How Your Job Can Predict Whether Or Not You’ll Get Divorced

iStock
iStock

These days, divorce is actually on the wane—2016 marked a nearly 40-year low in U.S. divorces—but whether or not you and your beloved spouse eventually part ways isn’t entirely up to fate. While individual relationships are all unique, statistically, there are demographic and other factors that influence whether or not a couple will divorce, from no-brainers like whether or not you’re willing to share chores equitably to more subtle factors like whether one partner smokes.

Your job matters too, as statistician Nathan Yau found in his analysis of 2015 data from the Census Bureau’s 5-year American Community Survey. As Business Insider and Entrepreneur report, the data shows that there can be vastly different divorce statistics when you’re talking about the marriages of bartenders and those of physical therapists, for instance.

A graph shows blue clusters plotting the links between income levels and divorce rates in different jobs.
Nathan Yau // Flowing Data

That doesn’t mean that going to work in a physical therapy office somehow better equips you for marriage than tending bar. Higher incomes and education levels, both intimately tied to your job, are also correlated with lower divorce rates. Sure, maybe the fact that flight attendants have to be away from their families for their job plays into their high divorce rates, but perhaps the type of person who wants to be a flight attendant might also be less inclined to settle down compared to people who dream of being an actuary.

Where does your job fall? Here are 10 fields with the lowest divorce rates surveyed:

1. Actuaries: 17 percent
2. Physical scientists: 18.9 percent
3. Medical and life scientists: 19.6 percent
4. Clergy: 19.8 percent
5. Software developers, applications and systems software: 20.3 percent
6. Physical therapists: 20.7 percent
7. Optometrists: 20.8 percent
8. Chemical engineers: 21.1 percent
9. Directors of religious activities and education: 21.3 percent
10. Physicians and surgeons: 21.8 percent

And here are the 10 highest-divorcing industries:

1. Gaming managers: 52.9 percent
2. Bartenders: 52.7 percent
3. Flight attendants: 50.5 percent
4. Gaming services workers: 50.3 percent
5. Rolling machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic: 50.1 percent
6. Switchboard operators: 49.7 percent
7. Extruding and drawing machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic: 49.6 percent
8. Telemarketers: 49.2 percent
9. Textile knitting and weaving machine operators: 48.9 percent
10. Extruding, forming, pressing, and compacting machine setters, operators, and tenders: 48.8 percent

Explore the data further on Flowing Data.

[h/t Business Insider]

Find the Best Wine to Pair With Your Favorite Halloween Candy

iStock/vadimguzhva
iStock/vadimguzhva

When you're a kid, Halloween is all about the candy. Unfortunately, the more sophisticated palate that often comes with adulthood can dampen the former thrill of a holiday that’s largely about cheap scares and even cheaper candy.

Thankfully, the folks at Vivino, a popular wine app, have found a way to help elevate the Halloween candy game (and with it, your joy). Their “Halloween Candy and Wine Matchmaker” pairs popular candies, from Skittles to Swedish Fish, with wine selections, to make sure your many treats complement one another.

As Vivino founder Heini Zachariassen told The Huffington Post, "Our candy and wine matchmaker is a fun way for our users to learn and talk about wine in a way that feels relatable and fun. Besides, Halloween is scary enough, we don't think picking a wine needs to be."

The best news of all? Many of the wines and candies have multiple pairing options—which means you can try out different flavor combos faster than you can say “trick or treat.”

A Look at the Highest (And Lowest) Paying Jobs in Each State

iStock.com/Steve Debenport
iStock.com/Steve Debenport

Job salaries are often a product of local demand, regional economies, and the education required. These guidelines don’t always hold true (some New York City-area sanitation workers can make in excess of $100,000 a year), but generally, the more skills a job requires, the larger the dollar amount on your pay stub.

The job-seeker advisors at Zippia have reinforced the point. Using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, they’ve put together a map of the highest-paying jobs in each state. And it’s not much of a surprise who’s cashing the largest checks.

A map displays the highest-paying jobs in each state
Zippia

Being an orthodontist in Alabama is apparently a great career choice; the dental specialists earn an average of $289,740 in a state where the median household income is $46,257 as of 2016.

Other health care providers—surgeons, oral surgeons, anesthesiologists, internists, dentists—make up the remainder of the map, with Florida, Maine, North Dakota, and Delaware rounding out the top five. The lowest white-collar salary was in Wyoming, where OBGYNs make a piddling $263,490.

Zippia also took a look at some of the least-financially viable jobs by state. In South Carolina, porters and bellhops make an average $17,810. In Nevada, casino dealers bring in just $18,000. But those numbers are rather misleading, as tips in service industries can usually offset meager salaries. The real problem comes in Iowa, where a movie theater projectionist can expect a salary of just $17,820. For more information on Zippia's findings, click here.

[h/t Zippia]

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