What Do Dogs Dream About?

iStock
iStock

One of the great pleasures of having a canine companion is watching them fall into an exhausted pile of fur after a long day of doing absolutely nothing. It’s at this point that many pet owners wonder: What do dogs dream about, if they dream at all?

First, researchers believe that yes, dogs do dream. There’s no actual testimony, but we know from a 2001 MIT study with rats that the animals can enter REM sleep and exhibit the same brain activity as they did while they were navigating a maze earlier. Other studies using electroencephalogram (EEG) devices have been able to observe similar activity in dog brains while slumbering. Like humans, dogs have a sleep stage where their breathing slows and their eye movements become rapid—all indicators that dreaming could occur.

There’s also the superficial evidence: Dogs often bark or twitch while asleep in ways that imply they’re dreaming of chasing an elusive target. (Or leaf.)

That’s because dogs, like us, probably dream about the events of the day—in their case, running, jumping, or playing. Dreams can even be breed-specific, as in the case of Pointers that go “on point” as though they were spotting game. Smaller dogs also tend to dream more than larger dogs, and older dogs more than midlife dogs.

Details of those dreams remain elusive. Apart from physical clues, it’s hard to know exactly what goes through an animal’s mind. Some gorillas who have been taught sign language have communicated their dreams to their handlers—sometimes about people they’ve seen recently. It’s also possible dogs dream about their owners frequently, since the canine/human bond is so strong.

If you want to observe dreaming in your own dog, experts recommend you wait until about 20 minutes after they’ve dozed off. Their muscles may begin to twitch and their eyes might start to flutter, both likely signs the dog is entering REM and starting to dream. It’s also important not to disturb them during this stage of sleep, since it can be startling to them. If you leave them be, maybe they’ll finally have an opportunity to catch whatever they’ve been chasing.

So what do dogs dream about? A lot of the time, probably the thing that’s most often on their mind: you.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Why Do Ants Die After the Queen Dies?

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iStock

Eduardo Fox:

A fundamental fact about social Hymenoptera (wasps, ants) that most people, including entomologists, are unaware of: They cannot live without their larvae.

Next time you see an ant’s nest, a bee hive, or a hornet’s nest, remember: That structure is essentially a neonatal ICU!

Why? Look at an ant’s body below:


Clker.com via Quora

Did you notice the waist? I tell you: The individual’s stomach is located after the thin waist. That means an ant cannot eat solids.

Now, take a look at an ant’s larva (a & b, below):


Notice the waist? There’s none. It means larvae eat solid food!

So, this is what happens: Ants are working hard together in that nest mainly to bring up hundreds of babies. They come out to get food and bring it back to the nest, then they chew it up and place it on their larvae. Larvae will swallow and digest the food for them. Especially protein. Larvae secrete nutrient-rich liquids back to the ants, which is their main source of amino acids and fatty acids.

Who lays eggs to produce larvae? Queens.*

What happens when queens die? No eggs, hence no larvae.

What happens when there are no larvae? Bad nutrition, ultimately no reason for the nest. Ants gradually get disorganized, and after a few weeks they die.

Wasps and more "primitive" ants can more easily produce a new queen who will be the next mated female in the hierarchy. However, if none of them is fertile enough and mated, the nest won’t last long. Bees work differently.

* Important technical notice: Queens normally live longer than workers. Nowhere in this answer did I mean to imply that larvae can somehow enable workers to live as long as queens!

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

How Much Is Game of Thrones Author George RR Martin Worth?

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

by Dana Samuel

Unsurprisingly, Game of Thrones took home another Emmy Award earlier this week for Outstanding Drama Series, which marked the series' third time winning the title. Of course, George RR Martin—the author who wrote the books that inspired the TV show, and the series' executive producer—celebrated the victory alongside ​the GoT cast.

For anyone who may be unfamiliar with Martin's work, he is the author of the A Song of Ice and Fire series, which is the epic fantasy series that led to the Game of Thrones adaptation. Basically, we really we have him to thank for this seven-year roller coaster we've been on.

At 70 years old (his birthday was yesterday, September 20th), Martin has had a fairly lengthy career as an author, consisting of a number of screenplays and TV pilots before A Song of Ice and Fire, which, ​according to Daily Mail he wrote in the spirit of The Lord of the Rings.

 Cast and crew of Outstanding Drama Series winner 'Game of Thrones' pose in the press room during the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

Martin sold the rights to his A Song of Ice and Fire series in 2007, and he truly owes the vast majority of his net worth to the success of his novels and the Game of Thrones TV series. So how much exactly is this acclaimed author worth? According to Daily Mail, Martin makes about $15 million annually from the TV show, and another $10 million from his successful literary works.

According to Celebrity Net Worth, that makes Martin's net worth about $65 million.

Regardless of his millions, Martin still lives a fairly modest life, and it's clear he does everything for his love of writing.

We'd like to extend a personal thank you to Martin for creating one of the most exciting and emotionally jarring storylines we've ever experienced.
We wish Game of Thrones could go ​on for 13 seasons, too!

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