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Two views of an adult Homo naledi cranium found in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa, where the remains of 15 individuals were discovered in a different cave in 2013.
Hawks et al. in eLife, 2017
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Puzzling Human Relative Homo Naledi May Have Lived at the Same Time as Our Ancestors

Original image
Two views of an adult Homo naledi cranium found in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa, where the remains of 15 individuals were discovered in a different cave in 2013.
Hawks et al. in eLife, 2017

It's tempting to think that evolution works in a straight line, with clearly defined, graduated steps from primitive to modern. We humans are especially prone to telling our own evolutionary story in this manner. Evolution doesn't work that way, though, and we aren’t even the end point of human evolution, but works in progress. (Personally, I hope we are amphibious and have fins in 3 million years. That would be awesome.)

The latest evidence for that essential truth comes from the Rising Star cave system in South Africa, where scientists say Homo naledi, the unusual hominid species they discovered there in 2013, is surprisingly young, living as recently as 236,000 years ago. That means it was one of various hominids wandering the Earth at the same time as the Neanderthals in Europe; the Denisovans in western Asia; the ancestors of the “hobbit,” Homo floresiensis; and, in Africa, potentially alongside the earliest members of our own species, Homo sapiens.

Moreover, the researchers found three more individuals in another chamber in the cave system, one of them with the most complete H. naledi skull discovered yet. (You can see it above.) Today the large team of researchers published a trio of papers documenting their results in the open-access journal eLife.

In 2015, we reported on the initial discovery of 15 sets of hominid remains found in the Dinaledi cave by a team of researchers led by paleoanthropologist Lee Berger. It was an unprecedented bounty of bones. Often, paleoanthropologists are reconstructing human evolutionary history from scant remains—a fragment of skull or jaw bone here, a femur or a finger there. But in the Dinaledi cave, there are at least 1500 bones, and likely a lot more, since only a small fraction of the cave was excavated by a half-dozen archaeologists—all female, all cavers, all slim enough to squeeze through a series of cave tunnels that narrowed to just 7 inches in one spot—who worked in extraordinary conditions to excavate the bones from a pitch-black cave nearly 100 feet beneath the surface.

The ancient creatures were no bigger than the small but formidable women who unearthed them. Slender and about 5 feet tall as adults, they would’ve weighed just under 100 pounds. Their bodies are a fascinating mosaic of primitive and modern: tiny, orange-sized brains housed in skulls with jaws and teeth closer to early Homo; shoulders suited for climbing trees but feet and ankles made for walking; hands potentially capable of making tools, but with fingers well-curved for tightly gripping tree branches.

The discovery made headlines worldwide. Most of us—whether scientist or science nerd—fascinated by the find had one question: How old were they?

DATING THE REMAINS

When H. naledi was first discovered, the researchers deliberately didn’t attempt to answer that question. Determining where a species fits into the evolutionary record based on its morphology is not an unusual approach, but it can also be misleading. In the past 1.5 years, other scientists have proposed ages for H. naledi that range from 100,000 to 2 million years ago.

In one of the current studies, researchers led by James Cook University geologist Paul Dirks conducted six dating tests to narrow the age range, including the paleomagnetic dating of calcite left behind by running water and a chemical analysis of three fossil teeth discovered in the cave using a technique called combined U-series and electron spin resonance (US-ESR) dating. From all the tests, they came up with an age range: they're most likely between 236,000 and 335,000 years old.

As eLife notes in a commentary on the study, “The estimated dates are much more recent than many had predicted, and mean that H. naledi was alive at the same time as the earliest members of our own species—which most likely evolved between 300,000 and 200,000 years ago. These new findings demonstrate why it can be unwise to try to predict the age of a fossil based only on its appearance, and emphasize the importance of dating specimens via independent tests.”

American Museum of Natural History paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall echoed that sentiment to Mental Floss. “This is an object lesson in trying to date anything by what it looks like,” he says. While he doesn't find the age estimate surprising, he’s less convinced that H. naledi belongs in our Homo genus: “Anything as odd as this is always going to be tough to fit into both a phylogeny and a timescale,” he notes.

Did our ancestors interact with this oddball? We have no idea. But we do know that the picture of human evolution continues to expand in detail and complexity with every discovery like H. naledi.

Bioarchaeologist (and regular Mental Floss contributor) Kristina Killgrove, who teaches biological anthropology, human origins, and evolutionary theory at the University of West Florida, tells us that the long wait for H. naledi dates was “worth it.”

She says, “These dates reveal a much more complicated story of hominin evolution than ever before. We used to think of human evolution as a single lineage—the classic image of the progression from apes to humans. But H. naledi shows that palaeoanthropologists are onto something far more complex—and far more interesting! While these new dates won't make it into textbooks in time for the fall semester, I will certainly be updating my human evolution lectures this summer."

ONE NEW CAVE, THREE NEW BODIES

Whatever we have to learn about this cousin of humanity can only be helped by the other discovery reported today in eLife: 133 bones from three likely H. naledi individuals—two adults and one child—found in another cave in the Rising Star system. First spotted in 2013 by cavers, the bones were unearthed in three locations in a cave the researchers coined Lesedi. The two caves are found at the same depth, but they’re not directly connected.

As with the first expedition into the Dinaledi cave, the working conditions for the researchers weren’t easy: Wits University archaeologist Marina Elliott, who led the intrepid team of “underground astronauts” who excavated both sites, told National Geographic that while the Lesedi cave was slightly easier to reach than Dinaledi, she still had to excavate one set of remains from a 2-foot-wide alcove while laying on her chest, her shoulders pinned between rocks. “It’s extremely physically difficult,” she said. “I’ve tried to do a lot of yoga to get myself to be able to do it.”

Elliott would probably say it was worth it, though; the remains she excavated in that location yielded the most complete H. naledi skull so far discovered. Dubbed Neo (after the Setswana word for "a gift," not the The Matrix character), this adult has a larger skull—and therefore a larger brain capacity—than the other specimens so far discovered, but it falls within an expected range.

ARE THESE BURIALS OF A SORT?

One of the most contentious theories Berger and the team proposed when the first H. naledi fossils were discovered was that these bodies had been intentionally placed in the cave in some sort of death ritual. Berger and John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist at the University of Wisconsin, revisit that theory in the third paper published in eLife. They point out that the caves are difficult to access and aren’t obvious “death traps” that individuals could’ve accidentally fallen into. Nor did the remains show any signs of mass death, having been fed upon by carnivores or scavengers, or of having been flushed into the caves by a water system.

So how did they get there?

The researchers write, “We propose that funerary caching by H. naledi is a reasonable explanation for the presence of remains in the Dinaledi and Lesedi Chambers. Mortuary behaviors, while culturally diverse, are universal among modern human cultural groups. Such behaviors are not seen in living non-human primates or in other social mammals, but many social mammals exhibit signs of grief, distress, or other emotional response when other individuals within their social group die.”

They say that while there’s no evidence of symbolic thinking among H. naledi, such sophisticated thought isn’t necessarily a requirement for a death ritual. The “physical and social effects of the deaths of group members” could have been motivation enough.

“Such behavior may have many different motivations, from the removal of decaying bodies from habitation areas, to the prevention of scavenger activity, to social bonding, which are not mutually exclusive,” they note. “We suggest only that such cultural behavior may have been within the capabilities of a species that otherwise presents every appearance of technical and subsistence strategies that were common across the genus Homo.”

Original image
Two views of an adult Homo naledi cranium found in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa, where the remains of 15 individuals were discovered in a different cave in 2013.
iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva
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Man Buys Two Metric Tons of LEGO Bricks; Sorts Them Via Machine Learning
May 21, 2017
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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva

Jacques Mattheij made a small, but awesome, mistake. He went on eBay one evening and bid on a bunch of bulk LEGO brick auctions, then went to sleep. Upon waking, he discovered that he was the high bidder on many, and was now the proud owner of two tons of LEGO bricks. (This is about 4400 pounds.) He wrote, "[L]esson 1: if you win almost all bids you are bidding too high."

Mattheij had noticed that bulk, unsorted bricks sell for something like €10/kilogram, whereas sets are roughly €40/kg and rare parts go for up to €100/kg. Much of the value of the bricks is in their sorting. If he could reduce the entropy of these bins of unsorted bricks, he could make a tidy profit. While many people do this work by hand, the problem is enormous—just the kind of challenge for a computer. Mattheij writes:

There are 38000+ shapes and there are 100+ possible shades of color (you can roughly tell how old someone is by asking them what lego colors they remember from their youth).

In the following months, Mattheij built a proof-of-concept sorting system using, of course, LEGO. He broke the problem down into a series of sub-problems (including "feeding LEGO reliably from a hopper is surprisingly hard," one of those facts of nature that will stymie even the best system design). After tinkering with the prototype at length, he expanded the system to a surprisingly complex system of conveyer belts (powered by a home treadmill), various pieces of cabinetry, and "copious quantities of crazy glue."

Here's a video showing the current system running at low speed:

The key part of the system was running the bricks past a camera paired with a computer running a neural net-based image classifier. That allows the computer (when sufficiently trained on brick images) to recognize bricks and thus categorize them by color, shape, or other parameters. Remember that as bricks pass by, they can be in any orientation, can be dirty, can even be stuck to other pieces. So having a flexible software system is key to recognizing—in a fraction of a second—what a given brick is, in order to sort it out. When a match is found, a jet of compressed air pops the piece off the conveyer belt and into a waiting bin.

After much experimentation, Mattheij rewrote the software (several times in fact) to accomplish a variety of basic tasks. At its core, the system takes images from a webcam and feeds them to a neural network to do the classification. Of course, the neural net needs to be "trained" by showing it lots of images, and telling it what those images represent. Mattheij's breakthrough was allowing the machine to effectively train itself, with guidance: Running pieces through allows the system to take its own photos, make a guess, and build on that guess. As long as Mattheij corrects the incorrect guesses, he ends up with a decent (and self-reinforcing) corpus of training data. As the machine continues running, it can rack up more training, allowing it to recognize a broad variety of pieces on the fly.

Here's another video, focusing on how the pieces move on conveyer belts (running at slow speed so puny humans can follow). You can also see the air jets in action:

In an email interview, Mattheij told Mental Floss that the system currently sorts LEGO bricks into more than 50 categories. It can also be run in a color-sorting mode to bin the parts across 12 color groups. (Thus at present you'd likely do a two-pass sort on the bricks: once for shape, then a separate pass for color.) He continues to refine the system, with a focus on making its recognition abilities faster. At some point down the line, he plans to make the software portion open source. You're on your own as far as building conveyer belts, bins, and so forth.

Check out Mattheij's writeup in two parts for more information. It starts with an overview of the story, followed up with a deep dive on the software. He's also tweeting about the project (among other things). And if you look around a bit, you'll find bulk LEGO brick auctions online—it's definitely a thing!

Original image
Two views of an adult Homo naledi cranium found in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system in South Africa, where the remains of 15 individuals were discovered in a different cave in 2013.
iStock
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8 Common Dog Behaviors, Decoded
May 25, 2017
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iStock

Dogs are a lot more complicated than we give them credit for. As a result, sometimes things get lost in translation. We’ve yet to invent a dog-to-English translator, but there are certain behaviors you can learn to read in order to better understand what your dog is trying to tell you. The more tuned-in you are to your dog’s emotions, the better you’ll be able to respond—whether that means giving her some space or welcoming a wet, slobbery kiss. 

1. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing with his legs and body relaxed and tail low. His ears are up, but not pointed forward. His mouth is slightly open, he’s panting lightly, and his tongue is loose. His eyes? Soft or maybe slightly squinty from getting his smile on.

What it means: “Hey there, friend!” Your pup is in a calm, relaxed state. He’s open to mingling, which means you can feel comfortable letting friends say hi.

2. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing with her body leaning forward. Her ears are erect and angled forward—or have at least perked up if they’re floppy—and her mouth is closed. Her tail might be sticking out horizontally or sticking straight up and wagging slightly.

What it means: “Hark! Who goes there?!” Something caught your pup’s attention and now she’s on high alert, trying to discern whether or not the person, animal, or situation is a threat. She’ll likely stay on guard until she feels safe or becomes distracted.

3. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing, leaning slightly forward. His body and legs are tense, and his hackles—those hairs along his back and neck—are raised. His tail is stiff and twitching, not swooping playfully. His mouth is open, teeth are exposed, and he may be snarling, snapping, or barking excessively.

What it means: “Don’t mess with me!” This dog is asserting his social dominance and letting others know that he might attack if they don’t defer accordingly. A dog in this stance could be either offensively aggressive or defensively aggressive. If you encounter a dog in this state, play it safe and back away slowly without making eye contact.

4. What you’ll see: As another dog approaches, your dog lies down on his back with his tail tucked in between his legs. His paws are tucked in too, his ears are flat, and he isn’t making direct eye contact with the other dog standing over him.

What it means: “I come in peace!” Your pooch is displaying signs of submission to a more dominant dog, conveying total surrender to avoid physical confrontation. Other, less obvious, signs of submission include ears that are flattened back against the head, an avoidance of eye contact, a tongue flick, and bared teeth. Yup—a dog might bare his teeth while still being submissive, but they’ll likely be clenched together, the lips opened horizontally rather than curled up to show the front canines. A submissive dog will also slink backward or inward rather than forward, which would indicate more aggressive behavior.

5. What you’ll see: Your dog is crouching with her back hunched, tail tucked, and the corner of her mouth pulled back with lips slightly curled. Her shoulders, or hackles, are raised and her ears are flattened. She’s avoiding eye contact.

What it means: “I’m scared, but will fight you if I have to.” This dog’s fight or flight instincts have been activated. It’s best to keep your distance from a dog in this emotional state because she could attack if she feels cornered.

6. What you’ll see: You’re staring at your dog, holding eye contact. Your dog looks away from you, tentatively looks back, then looks away again. After some time, he licks his chops and yawns.

What it means: “I don’t know what’s going on and it’s weirding me out.” Your dog doesn’t know what to make of the situation, but rather than nipping or barking, he’ll stick to behaviors he knows are OK, like yawning, licking his chops, or shaking as if he’s wet. You’ll want to intervene by removing whatever it is causing him discomfort—such as an overly grabby child—and giving him some space to relax.

7. What you’ll see: Your dog has her front paws bent and lowered onto the ground with her rear in the air. Her body is relaxed, loose, and wiggly, and her tail is up and wagging from side to side. She might also let out a high-pitched or impatient bark.

What it means: “What’s the hold up? Let’s play!” This classic stance, known to dog trainers and behaviorists as “the play bow,” is a sign she’s ready to let the good times roll. Get ready for a round of fetch or tug of war, or for a good long outing at the dog park.

8. What you’ll see: You’ve just gotten home from work and your dog rushes over. He can’t stop wiggling his backside, and he may even lower himself into a giant stretch, like he’s doing yoga.

What it means: “OhmygoshImsohappytoseeyou I love you so much you’re my best friend foreverandeverandever!!!!” This one’s easy: Your pup is overjoyed his BFF is back. That big stretch is something dogs don’t pull out for just anyone; they save that for the people they truly love. Show him you feel the same way with a good belly rub and a handful of his favorite treats.

The best way to say “I love you” in dog? A monthly subscription to BarkBox. Your favorite pup will get a package filled with treats, toys, and other good stuff (and in return, you’ll probably get lots of sloppy kisses). Visit BarkBox to learn more.

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