25 Things You Should Know About Little Rock

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iStock

The Natural State's capital city is home to a legendary WWII general, a First Daughter, and a retirement community for everyone's favorite singing fish. Below, a few more facts you might not know about Little Rock, Arkansas.  

1. Little Rock's own Finkbeiner Meat Packing Co. is the birthplace of the “cheese dog,” a hot dog with a molten cheese center, which was developed in 1956. 

2. This Thanksgiving, impress your guests with the fact that the brown-n-serve rolls you just put on the table were invented at Meyer’s Bakery in Little Rock in the 1930s [PDF], on the southwest corner of West Seventh and South Pulaski.

3. In MacArthur Park on Little Rock's McMath Avenue stands a little historic marker commemorating a somewhat strange event: the first human dissection in Arkansas. Doctors in Arkansas were originally forbidden from dissecting corpses in order to research human anatomy, due to the religious belief that bodies must be whole and intact in order to ascend to the afterlife. However, Drs. James H. Lenow and Richard S. Vickery finally broke the taboo in November 1874, and in 1927, the Arkansas Medical Society erected a monument in the spot where it happened, "to perpetuate the early history of medicine in the state.”

4. The only brick-and-mortar purse museum in the country is in Little Rock. Located in the South Main district of Little Rock, The Esse Purse Museum chronicles not only the kinds of bags American women carried through history, but also, perhaps more fascinatingly, the things they carried in them.

5. In 1821, the city of Little Rock was briefly renamed "Arkopolis" during a land dispute. The name can be seen on old maps from the era.

 

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6.There is no official demonym for residents of Little Rock. Some prefer "Little Rockian," while others use the slightly more adorable "Little Rocker." 

7. The Old Mill in North Little Rock, pictured in the iconic opening scene of the 1939’s Gone With The Wind,  is thought to be the only structure still standing from the film’s production. 

8. Speaking of which, The Old Mill was never actually a mill to begin with. Constructed out of treated concrete and deliberately made to look like old wood, it was a commissioned work by Mexican sculptor Dionicio Rodriguez in 1932, intended as a tourist attraction.

9. Taking nine years to build, Little Rock’s red brick Old State House Museum is the oldest standing state capitol building west of the Mississippi River. Construction began in 1833 and finished in 1842.

 

10. Produced by Little Rock native Harry Thomason, the TV series Designing Women contained two notable exterior shots that were filmed in Little Rock. Villa Marre, built in 1881, is the mansion where Sugarbaker Designs is located on the show; Suzanne Sugarbaker's home is also featured, although it's probably better known as the Arkansas Governor's Mansion. Both are found in the city's historic Quapaw Quarter.

11. After the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education ruling deemed segregation in schools unconstitutional, a group of black students known today as The Little Rock Nine made history as they were escorted into Little Rock Central High School by the Arkansas National Guard per President Dwight D. Eisenhower's order.

12. A monument to the Little Rock Nine, "Testament," stands on the grounds of the state capitol. 

 

13. When the Little Rock Zoo opened in 1926, it had only two animals: a circus-trained bear and an abandoned timber wolf.

14. Arkansas' capital city is home to The Billy Bass Adoption Center, a gallery displaying hundreds of the singing plastic fish trophies of the 1990s, found inside the Flying Fish restaurant. Little Rock's center, interestingly, is not the world's only retirement community for Billy Basses, but it does claim to be the world's first. Each Billy Bass donor receives a free basket of catfish along with his or her name on a wall plaque.

15. For 11 years, until it was converted into a Marriott in the spring of 2015, the Peabody Hotel in downtown Little Rock held a daily "duck march" wherein a group of mallards were led into the lobby's fountain at 11 am. Then at 5 pm, the ducks, fielded by the hotel's red-jacketed duckmaster, were herded into the elevator and sent waddling back up to their ducky penthouse on the roof. 

16. "Little Rock" isn't just a cute nickname: It stems from an actual little rock. While leading a party of travelers, French explorer Bernard de la Harpe christened a certain small rock formation on the Arkansas River as La Petite Roche—“the little rock”—and the name stuck around once the area was settled. 

17. Little Rock's appropriately-named Big Dam Bridge is the longest pedestrian- and cyclist-only bridge in the U.S. Spanning .8 miles, it connects 14 miles of trails in Little Rock and nearby North Little Rock.

18. In 1885, when the town had a population of approximately 25,000, a Little Rock newspaper reportedly offered a free plow with each prepaid subscription of $12.

19. Little Rock is home to Heifer International, Dillard's department stores, and investment firm Stephens Inc., responsible for taking Walmart public back in the early 1970s.

20. Construction on Little Rock’s Arkansas State Capitol was completed in 1915. Because it was modeled closely after the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., the Arkansas capitol has been used in several films as a stand-in for the real thing (such as in 1991’s Stone Cold, starring Brian Bosworth).

21. Although the Clintons' name is splashed all over the city, from the airport to the presidential library, neither Bill nor Hillary are actually from Little Rock. Hillary originally hails from Chicago, and Bill was born in tiny Hope, Ark., about 115 miles southwest of the state capital. (Their daughter, Chelsea, however, was born in Little Rock proper.)

22. Another famous former resident: General Douglas MacArthur, who was born there in 1880.

23. During the Civil War, when the Confederate Army suffered a serious defeat in the battle of Pea Ridge in March of 1862, the state was consequently left largely undefended. Seeing an opportunity, Union forces made their way to Searcy, meaning to advance on the Confederate city of Little Rock. As such, Governor Henry M. Rector temporarily moved the entire state government to nearby Hot Springs for safekeeping. Ultimately, Little Rock was not attacked by the Union army, and the seat of government was restored in Little Rock in July of the same year.

24. This wasn’t the only time that Arkansas’s governmental operations have been shifted around. In 1821, when it became apparent that the original capital of Arkansas Territory, Arkansas Post, was prone to frequent flooding, the seat of government was moved to Little Rock.

25. The Arkansas School for the Deaf is located in Little Rock. Its mascot: the leopard.

11 Tips for Traveling With Your Pet, According to a Veterinarian

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iStock/walik

Planning a trip can be stressful no matter the circumstances. When you want to include the family pet in your plans, you have a whole new list of things to worry about, including packing the right equipment, checking your hotel’s pet policy, and making sure your pet meets the travel criteria for the state or country you’re visiting. But if you’re aware of the steps you need to take, traveling with your pet can be a positive experience for all involved. Mental Floss spoke with Dr. Danielle Bernal, a veterinarian with Wellness Natural Pet Food, about what to keep in mind before hitting the road with your furry companion.

1. Keep pets comfortable in a travel crate.

You may be tempted to give your pet plenty of room on long car trips, but giving them a confined space that’s their own is usually the better option. According to Bernal, “It’s often better for the dog, because if they’re crate-trained, that’s their area of security.” It’s safer as well: An animal is much better off in a durable crate than it is sliding around untethered in the backseat of a car.

2. Don’t fill your pet's crate with toys.

Giving your pet lots of toys to play with at home is a good thing—but on long car trips it's a different story. Packing every toy your pet loves into their crate takes up what little room they have to themselves. If the crate is too full, it can be impossible for them to move around and adjust their position. “Yes, you want them to be comfortable, but also you don’t want to fill that crate up,” Bernal says. “So almost less is more.”

3. Make sure you have all the correct paperwork.

If you’re planning a long trip with your pet, you won’t get very far without the right paperwork. Many places require incoming pets to have an up-to-date health certificate signed by an accredited veterinarian. Before signing the documents, vets will confirm that your pet is healthy and up-to-date on all vaccinations required by the receiving state or country. If you’re flying, contact the airline to see if any other special paperwork is required to transport your animal.

4. Make it easier to find your pet if they get lost.

An unfamiliar location miles away from home is the worst place to lose your pet. Before your trip, make sure they’re easy to find in case the worst happens. Implanting a microchip under your dog or cat’s skin will make them trackable no matter where in the country they wander off to. If you’re not willing to commit to that procedure, at least make sure the contact information on their tags is up-to-date—that way, they're more likely to be returned to satefy if someone finds them.

5. Skip a meal on travel days.

No matter how accommodating you are to your pet, some anxiety on their part is inevitable. Bernal says a common symptom of this is stress diarrhea—which is the last thing pet owners want to deal with on a long car or plane ride. Even if your pet doesn't seem stressed before the trip, plain old motion sickness can upset your animal’s stomach rather quickly. Bernal recommends feeding them less than you usually would prior to traveling to avoid future accidents: “If you have a pet you know has those sensitivities, I would keep their tummy empty. It will be good for the pet and it will be nicer for everyone in the car too.” That doesn’t mean you should starve your pet if they’re begging for food; just skip the last meal you would normally feed them before beginning your journey.

6. Keep your pet hydrated.

Without regular access to water whenever they need it, pets can get easily dehydrated when traveling. Keep this in mind when traveling and pack extra water for your four-legged passenger. Allowing animals to self-regulate their water intake, perhaps by attaching a bowl to the inside of their crate, is ideal, but if that’s not possible, stop frequently to give them a chance to drink. Another way to keep them feeling good is to feed them wet food instead of dry; according to Bernal, the water content in wet food can help hydrate pets.

7. keep them occupied with a toy.

If you can only give your pet one toy on a long trip, choose something that will keep them busy for as long as possible. Bernal recommends puzzle dog toys like those you’ll find from the pet brand Kong. When your dog is preoccupied on reaching the treat inside the toy, it's harder for them to focus on anything else—including the stress of traveling to a new place.

8. Never leave your pet in a car alone.

Hopefully this is common sense for most pet parents, but Bernal emphasizes that this is the most important thing to remember when traveling with an animal—especially during the summer months. “Don’t leave them in a locked car,” she says. “It takes seven minutes for them to basically move into a situation where it becomes fatal.” It doesn’t matter if you crack a window or if you’re only stepping out of your car for a few minutes. If it’s a hot day, dogs should never be left alone in a vehicle. “We need to make sure that all pet parents are aware of that,” Bernal says.

9. Choose pet-friendly accommodations.

You may love your pet, but that doesn’t mean the owner of the hotel or Airbnb where you’re staying will love them, too; be mindful of this when booking accommodations for your trip. There are plenty of hotels that offer perks for pet owners, like doggie daycare, but even if a place doesn’t advertise their pet policy, it doesn’t hurt to call and ask (or simply confirm what you're reading online so that there are no surprises when you arrive).

10. Make your travel destination feel like home.

Your pet’s crate may not be the best place for all their toys, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pack them when going on vacation. Bringing their favorite items from home can make pets feel more at ease when they arrive at an unfamiliar destination. “Pack things that are familiar to them, so when they arrive at a new spot they’re like: ‘Ok, I feel a lot more comfortable,’” Bernal says. “It helps with their anxiety.” And you shouldn’t stop at toys: Packing their bed, bowl, and blanket can have the same calming effect.

11. Know when it's best to leave your pet at home.

Not every vacation is improved by bringing your pet along. If you plan on spending most of your trip in places that don’t allow animals, like museums, restaurants, and theme parks, it may be best to leave your pet at a kennel or with a sitter or trusted friend. Even if the vacation is pet-friendly, it may not be a good fit for an animal that’s especially anxious. “If you have a nervous dog, he’s actually going to be happier in his home if someone just comes in and feeds him,” Bernal says. Your pet will forgive you for having fun without them.

10,000 People Gathered at Stonehenge to Welcome the Summer Solstice

Finnbarr Webster, Getty Images
Finnbarr Webster, Getty Images

There are plenty of reasons to welcome the start of summer. Today, people visiting Stonehenge took that celebration to a whole new level.

The BBC reported that an estimated 10,000 people made the pilgrimage to the 5000-year-old site to partake in summer solstice festivities. "Stonehenge was built to align with the Sun, and to Neolithic people, the skies were arguably as important as the surrounding landscape," Susan Greaney, a senior historian at English Heritage, said in a statement. "At solstice we remember the changing daylight hours, but the changing seasons, the cycles of the Moon, and movements of the Sun are likely to have underpinned many practical spiritual aspects of Neolithic life."

These spiritual aspects are just one of the many fascinating facts about the summer solstice; the day is an extremely old calendar event recognized by ancient cultures across the globe. They include the Druids and other pagans, whose tradition of observing the solstice at Stonehenge has long been upheld by modern revelers.

Scientifically speaking, Stonehenge is an optimal viewing place for the solstice due to its structure. According to TIME, the site’s architects appeared to have kept both the summer and winter solstices in mind during its construction, as the positions of the stones are specifically tuned to complement the sky on both occasions.

The solstices were sacred to the pagans, whose modern-day followers continue to honor their rituals. Pagans in particular refer to the day as Litha, and mark it with activities such as meditation, fire rites, and outdoor yoga.

“What you’re celebrating on a mystical level is that you’re looking at light at its strongest," Frank Somers, a member of the Amesbury and Stonehenge Druids, said in 2014. "It represents things like the triumph of the king, the power of light over darkness, and just life—life at its fullest."

Those who were unable to make the journey can head over to the Stonehenge Skyscape project's website, where English Heritage’s interactive live feed fully captured the experience.

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