15 Cool Facts About Frozen Food

iStock.com/hutchyb
iStock.com/hutchyb

Frozen foods are easy to take for granted—all that clever packaging, all those choices, all that ice cream—simply because their very existence hinges on simplicity, convenience, and ease. But frozen foods have a complicated backstory, a long scientific evolution, and a debate over pizza origins that could make your head spin. In honor of National Frozen Food Day, which takes place on March 6, let's dig into the history.

1. They don't require any added preservatives.

Frozen foods do not require any added preservatives to keep them safe and consumable, because microbes—the kind that make you sick—cannot grow on any food that is at a temperature less than 0°F. The microbes don't die at that temperature, but they stop multiplying. Be careful when you unfreeze food; microbes will instantly start growing as they do on unfrozen food, so it’s best to handle thawing food as you would fresh food.

2. It's a myth that freezing food depletes it of nutrients.

Despite some old wives’ tales, freezing food does not remove any nutrients. Freeze away!

3. Freezer burn is normal.

You don’t need to be afraid of freezer burn or color changes in your properly frozen food. Freezer burn is just the result of air hitting frozen food and allowing the ice to sublimate; other color changes can be blamed on long freezing times or poor packaging. It might look gross, but if your frozen food has maintained a proper temperature, it’s fine to eat. (Still, give it a sniff before chowing down.)

4. Over time, freezing food can diminish its quality.

Freezing food typically keeps items edible indefinitely, although taste and quality may diminish over time. Some items that stay tasty even after long freezes include uncooked game, poultry, and meat, which are still good even after up to a year in the freezer.

5. Frozen foods hit the industrial market in the 1800s.


iStock

Even though freezing food was used as a storage technique in cold weather climates for many years, it’s believed it was first applied to industrial food sales sometime in the 1800s, when a wily Russian company froze a small quantity of duck and geese and shipped them to London. By 1899, the Baerselman Bros. company adapted frozen storage for their own Russia-to-England food shipping business, though they initially only operated during cold weather months.

6. Carl Paul Gottfried Linde is the unofficial godfather of frozen food.

Carl Paul Gottfried Linde, an engineer, scientist, and professor at the Technical University of Munich, is basically the father of frozen food. Sort of. He helped pioneer industrial cooling, through what’s commonly known as the Hampson-Linde cycle, and used his findings to plan an ice and refrigeration machine back in the 19th century.

7. Guinness played a part in the history of frozen food.

Linde’s desire to build such machines was only furthered in 1892, when the Guinness Brewery requested that Linde create a carbon dioxide liquefaction plant for them, pushing him still further into the arena of low temperature refrigeration and the liquefaction of air. Thanks, beer!

8. Clarence Birdseye revolutionized the industry.

Ever wonder about the namesake of Birds Eye Frozen Foods? It came straight from the company’s founder, Clarence Birdseye, who introduced the concept of flash freezing to the world.

9. Birdseye's "a-ha" moment came to him in the Arctic.

Frozen food pioneer Clarence Birdseye in a portrait from the 1950s
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Birdseye developed his technique after seeing food freezing in action in the Arctic, and noting how much better frozen fish tasted if it had been frozen immediately after been caught—like a flash!—versus food that was frozen on a delay.

10. Birdseye is also partly to thank for the freezers that line grocery store aisles.

Not only did Birdseye help pioneer flash freezing as a frozen food standard, he also helped develop in-store freezer cases and refrigerated boxcars that allowed his frozen foods (and, yes, others) to travel near and far.

11. America's first commercial frozen food line went on sale in 1930.

Birdseye’s food was so prevalent that it was actually the first frozen food sold commercially in the United States. On March 6, 1930, Birds Eye frozen foods were put on sale at Davidson’s Market in Springfield, Massachusetts, the first product of its kind.

12. The TV dinner was not the first frozen meal.

The first “complete” frozen meal was not actually the beloved TV dinner—it was airplane food! In 1945, Maxson Food Systems, Inc. starting making their so-called “Strato-Plates,” meals that were created specifically for consumption on airplanes (both by military and civilian passengers). Each frozen meal included a meat, a vegetable, and a potato, and was meant to be reheated for in-air chowing.

13. It was Swanson's who coined the term TV dinner.

Maxson closed up shop before their Strato-Plates could be sold on the ground, but other companies picked up the slack, including One-Eyed Eskimo, Quaker State Food, and Swanson’s, which is widely hailed as the true creator of TV dinners: they coined the name and were the most well-known maker of tasty compartmentalized meals in the 1950s.

14. A corporate executive's heart attack inspired the "healthy" frozen meal trend.

Conagra Foods introduced its Healthy Choice line of frozen food back in 1989, after the corporation was inspired to pursue healthy frozen picks after its chairman, Charles Harper, suffered a heart attack due to his bad eating habits. 

15. Who invented the frozen pizza? It's complicated.

Whole pepperoni pizza on wood cutting board
iStock.com/dbvirago

There’s long been a debate over which company first introduced the frozen pizza to the grocery store market, with both Totino’s and Tombstone vying for the title. A more likely candidate? The Celentano brothers, who owned their own Italian specialty store in New Jersey in the 1950s, are believed to have marketed the first frozen pizza in 1957.

This article originally appeared in 2016.

UK Burger King Restaurants Will Stop Giving Plastic Toys With Kids' Meals

Leon Neal/Getty Images
Leon Neal/Getty Images

Fast food companies don't have a reputation for being eco-friendly, but through small changes made in recent years, some of the biggest names in the industry are working to reduce their environmental impact. Just a few weeks after introducing the meat-free Impossible Whopper, Burger King announced a new policy for its United Kingdom locations. As CNN reports, UK restaurants will no long include plastic toys with kids' meals.

The change comes after two sisters from the UK started a petition on Change.org calling on McDonald's and Burger King to stop distributing plastic toys with kids' meals. Ella and and Caitlin McEwan, who were 9 and 7 respectively when the petition launched this summer, wrote, “children only play with the plastic toys they give us for a few minutes before they get thrown away and harm animals and pollute the sea." They went on to say: "It’s not enough to make recyclable plastic toys—big, rich companies shouldn’t be making toys out of plastic at all." Their online petition has received more than 530,000 signatures.

By cutting plastic from kids' meals, Burger King estimates it will avoid wasting 350 tons of single-use plastic a year. The chain has also installed containers in its UK stores for collecting old plastic toys from customers, so the material can be recycled to make playgrounds. The UK represents just a fraction of Burger King's market, but according to the company, non-biodegradable plastic toys will be phased out of all locations by 2025.

McDonald's has had a different response to the McEwan sister's petition. Instead of doing away with plastic toys completely, UK restaurants will give customers the option to swap toys for fruit with their Happy Meals later this year, and then allow them to opt for books instead for a period in early 2020. Meanwhile, in Canada and Germany, some McDonald's restaurants are experimenting with going totally plastic-free. The more sustainable restaurants feature paper straws, waffle cone condiment cups, and burger wrappers made from grass.

[h/t CNN]

How to Make 3 Delicious Fall Cocktails

Mental Floss Video
Mental Floss Video

As the leaves start to change color, it’s time to put away the White Claw and the rosé …OK, sure, you can drink whatever you like whenever you like. But if you live in a temperate climate, part of the fun of changing seasons is falling in love with new beverages and meals that complement the weather. That’s why we asked Eamon Rockey, the Director of Beverage Studies at the Institute of Culinary Education, to craft three cocktails that are perfect for fall. 

Pumpkin Spice Flip Recipe

Ingredients:

Blended Scotch
Maple Syrup
Pumpkin Puree
One Whole Egg
Cinnamon

Instructions:

  1. Add 2 ounces of blended scotch to a cocktail shaker
  2. Add 3/4 of an ounce of good maple syrup
  3. Add 1 heaping tablespoon of pumpkin puree
  4. Crack 1 egg and add to mixture
  5. Add one piece of ice and shake vigorously, to emulsify the ingredients
  6. Add ice to the top of your shaker and shake again, to chill and dilute the drink
  7. Double-strain into a cocktail glass. You want all of the volume and richness of the egg, without any solid matter or shards of ice. 
  8. Garnish with freshly grated cinnamon and serve

Four Apples a Day Recipe

Ingredients:

Calvados
Rockey’s Milk Punch
Hard Apple Cider
One Granny Smith Apple

Instructions:

  1. Add 1.5 ounces of calvados to a mixing glass
  2. Add 2 ounces of Rockey’s Milk Punch
  3. Stir with ice to chill
  4. Strain into a wine glass
  5. Top with 3 ounces of hard apple cider
  6. Garnish with fresh apple in any style you like

Old Fashioned Recipe

Ingredients:

Bourbon
Angostura Bitters
Simple Syrup

Instructions:

  1. Add 2.5 ounces of bourbon to a mixing glass
  2. Add 3 dashes of Angostura bitters
  3. Add 1/2 an ounce of simple syrup (50% sugar, 50% water)
  4. Add ice and stir, to chill and dilute the drink
  5. Strain into a rocks glass containing a large cube of ice
  6. Finish with a freshly cut twist of orange peel

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER