What You Should Know About Gmail and Google Calendar Malicious Spam Invites

Carsten Koall, Getty Images
Carsten Koall, Getty Images

With an estimated 1.5 billion users, Google’s Gmail service is so widely used that any misuse of its features can have far-reaching consequences. As Forbes contributor Davey Winder points out, one feature in particular--Google's Calendar function--could conceivably lead to spam invites.

Google Calendar, which is accessible via Gmail, notifies users of scheduled appointments that are either manually inserted or created from an email invitation. The problem, Winder explains, is in Calendar allowing anyone to schedule a meeting with a user without email notification and Gmail allowing those events to be automatically added to Calendar. Because Gmail users assume the invites must be legitimate, they might click on a pop-up notification about a fraudulent event, or a link within a fraudulent event, that leads to a malicious attack site. In extreme cases, the links can lead to portals where bank or credit card information is solicited.

In an example used by Black Hills Information Security, which discovered the flaw, a Calendar user might receive a notice about an “all-hands” meeting starting in a few minutes along with a link to information that will be discussed at the meeting. Feeling a sense of urgency, a user may not examine the reminder too closely, click the link, and be transferred to a site with malicious software.

Though the vulnerability has been known and publicized for years, Google is only recently taking steps to address it, announcing via a help forum post that they’re working to reduce the potential for spam or malicious links to be passed along through the service.

Until then, it’s best for users to be more diligent when it comes to interacting with the Calendar function. Under the Settings > Event Configuration settings, “Automatically add invitations” should be disabled; the option for showing invitations users have responded to should be enabled. It’s also advisable never to follow any link from a Calendar email from an address or entity you don’t recognize.

[h/t Forbes]

PopSockets Is Rolling Out a Line of Drink Holders

PopSockets
PopSockets

PopSockets have become something of a fidgeting consumer’s dream. The cute and accordion-esque accessory knob that attaches to phones allows for an improved grip and gives people something to noodle with. Now, the company is hoping you’ll recognize the value in having a PopSockets appliance for your hot and cold drinks.

The PopThirst Cup Sleeve and the PopThirst Can Holder resemble insulated sleeves you can purchase for beverages. But these sleeves have a socket for a PopGrip attachment, which you can thread between your fingers to make for a more secure grip. This might be beneficial in the car, where bumpy roads can prompt more spills.

A PopSockets PopThirst cup sleeve is pictured
PopSockets

Holding a drink with the PopGrip acting as a handle seems a little more precarious. Most people will not do this, but if they do, you will probably find the consequences on Instagram.

Since going on sale in 2014, PopSockets has become a phone accessory giant, moving 100 million units in 2018.

The PopThirst Cup Sleeve and Can Holder are both one-size-fits-all and retail for $15 each.

[h/t The Verge]

Missing the Days of Clippy? There’s an App That Will Bring Him Back

The Science Elf, YouTube
The Science Elf, YouTube

Some Microsoft Office users might still brace for the appearance of a certain nosy, wide-eyed paper clip whenever they type Dear at the top of a fresh Word document. After all, Clippy was the anthropomorphic pet we never asked for, yet tolerated through several formative years of computer technology.

Though Clippy—short for Clippit—may have been on the receiving end of an industry-wide eye roll in the late 1990s, it’s hard to ignore how much he seems like an early, distant ancestor to applications like Alexa and Siri, upon whom society has developed a pretty significant reliance. Whether you think about the injustice against Clippy every day or you’re just a normal person who likes any excuse to indulge in ‘90s nostalgia, we have news for you: You can rescue him from the void and host him on your very own Mac desktop.

According to Lifehacker, the app was created by a developer named Devran “Cosmo” Uenal, who debuted the program on Github earlier this month. This rather chilled-out Clippy won’t burst into your Word document and offer unsolicited advice on how to write letters, but he’ll still entertain you with animated performances if you right-click on him and choose “Animate!”

As you can see in Uenal’s Twitter video, he might don a pair of oversized headphones and mime a music jam sessions, or he might transform into a googly-eyed, heavy-eyebrowed checkmark.

To download the paperclip pal for yourself, scroll down to the “First start” section on the Github page and click “Download Clippy for macOS,” which should trigger an automatic download. Click on that installation file, and then follow the rest of the directions in the “First start” section to open Clippy on your desktop. From there, the fun is endless.

And, if you’re hungry for more history about the world’s most hated virtual assistant, you can read more about his tragic life here.

[h/t Lifehacker]

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