Whirlpool Just Recalled More Than 26,000 Glass Cooktops for Turning On By Themselves

Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images
Cunaplus_M.Faba/iStock via Getty Images

After receiving 133 reports of glass cooktops turning on by themselves, Whirlpool has recalled more than 26,000 of the appliances.

CBS Sacramento reports that the cooktops in question are both radiant and downdraft radiant models with glass cooking surfaces and touch controls, and they were all sold between March 2017 and August 2019, for $1150 to $2500. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the appliances bear the brand names Whirlpool, KitchenAid, or JennAir (the Whirlpool Corporation owns KitchenAid and JennAir) and were sold in home improvement and appliance stores, including Lowe’s, Home Depot, and Best Buy, both in person and online.

In other words, if you have a glass cooktop, it’s probably worth checking the model number and serial number, which should be printed on the underside of the appliance. Enter the numbers into Whirlpool’s online form to determine if yours was recalled. If it was, Whirlpool will install a new one free of charge. In the meantime, the CPSC advises that you turn off the unit at the circuit breaker when you’re not using it, and don’t leave flammable objects or empty cookware on or around the area.

Thankfully, the faulty cooktops haven’t gravely injured anybody, but they have caused a fair amount of damage. There have been 14 reports of heat damage to nearby items, four reports of fire, and one report of property damage, and two people have sustained minor burn injuries.

It’s not the only device that’s recently been recalled due to fire safety risks. Earlier this month, Apple issued a recall of more than 460,000 MacBook Pro batteries. Find out how to check if yours was affected here.

[h/t CBS Sacramento]

Here’s How to Find Out If Your MacBook Pro Was Just Banned by the FAA

shironosov/iStock via Getty Images
shironosov/iStock via Getty Images

Back in June, Apple issued a recall of approximately 460,000 15-inch MacBook Pro laptops sold between September 2015 and February 2017, stating that “the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.” Now, Bloomberg reports that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has warned airlines to ban those batteries from flights.

Technically, airlines could have started banning the laptops as soon as Apple issued the recall, since 2016 airline safety instructions mandate that all recalled batteries may not fly as cargo or in carry-on baggage. The FAA has essentially alerted them to the recall and reminded them about the existing rules.

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency banned the laptops in early August, which has been implemented so far by TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat. Domestic airlines in the U.S. are now following suit, so it’s worth finding out if your laptop battery is part of the recall if you have plans to fly soon. Even if you don’t have any current travel plans, it’s a good opportunity to get your recalled battery replaced—which Apple will do for free.

Fast Company outlines exactly how to check your device: Click the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen, and tap “About This Mac.” If you see “MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Mid 2015)” or a similar description, copy the serial number, and paste it into the box under the “Eligibility” section on this page. If your laptop was affected, scroll down and follow the directions to make an appointment for a replacement battery.

Once your battery is replaced, you’re free to fly with your MacBook; just make sure to bring documentation of your battery replacement to the airport, in case officials ask for proof.

[h/t Bloomberg]

The CDC Warns That Just Touching Contaminated Pig Ear Dog Treats Can Make Humans Sick

Chalabala/iStock via Getty Images
Chalabala/iStock via Getty Images

Following concerns this week about a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella tied to pig ear dog treats, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have passed along further clarification. Because the agencies cannot link the outbreak to any one supplier, they advise not to buy or feed any pig ear treats to animals. Just as importantly, they caution humans shouldn’t even be touching them.

According to the CDC, a total of 127 human cases of Salmonella poisoning reported in 33 states have been linked to the dog treats, which are typically dehydrated and intact pig ears—though they may also come from other parts of a swine—that often have added flavoring. By chewing on or consuming the ears, animals can contract Salmonella, the bacteria that causes foodborne illness and prompts symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting, and fever and sometimes requires hospitalization. In pets, symptoms may also include bloody diarrhea and fatigue.

A dog enjoys a pig ear dog treat
Rosalie, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The CDC and FDA are telling consumers to avoid touching these pig ears altogether because Salmonella can easily be passed from their surface to human hands. If hands are not washed, the bacteria can spread to other surfaces or to a person’s mouth, causing infection. A dog who has just consumed Salmonella and then licks someone’s face or open wound can also pass along the bacteria.

The CDC has examined treats from a variety of suppliers, including some that claim to have been irradiated to kill bacteria. They have yet to isolate the outbreak to a single source. All pig ear treats, regardless of brand, should be discarded and surfaces or containers they’ve touched should be washed with soap and water.

[h/t CNN]

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