What You Should Know About the Capital One Hack Affecting 100 Million People

Poike/iStock via Getty Images
Poike/iStock via Getty Images

What’s in your wallet? Possibly a compromised credit profile. Capital One announced Monday that more than 100 million people in the U.S. and 6 million in Canada have been affected by a data hack that’s left their personal and financial information vulnerable.

According to MarketWatch, the hackers were able to secure credit scores, ZIP codes, email addresses, and birth dates of Capital One card members and applicants. Worse, roughly 140,000 Social Security numbers were nabbed. So were about 80,000 bank account numbers.

The company acted in concert with the FBI to investigate the hack, which Capital One says it first discovered on July 19. A suspect, Paige A. Thompson, was arrested in Seattle and charged with one count of computer fraud and abuse. At this point, Capital One has no indication the data has been used for fraudulent purposes, but there’s no way of knowing if that could change.

The company intends to reach out to cardholders affected by the crime to notify them of the hack and to offer two years of free credit monitoring, which has become the standard gratuity for companies trying to address the shaken faith of consumers. Recently, Equifax agreed to a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) that would give consumers affected by their 2017 hack free credit monitoring or up to $125, with the option of claiming another $250 to $500 for time spent resolving fraud issues or identity theft as a result of compromised personal data.

If you’re concerned your information might be used for identity theft, it’s best to monitor your credit reports or cards for suspicious activity. If your bank account was compromised, notify your banking institution. You can also opt to “freeze” your credit profiles from the three major credit bureaus: Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. Freezing the reports prevents any business from checking them and makes opening new accounts impossible. If you want to open an account or take out a loan, however, you’ll need to unfreeze the reports.

[h/t MarketWatch]

Splitwise App Makes Splitting the Bill for Dinner, a Trip, Household Bills, or Anything Else Easy

DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images
DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images

Whether it’s from a three-week adventure across Europe or just happy hour drinks around the corner, you’re probably familiar with the headache that is trying to split bills among groups of people. Apps like Venmo and PayPal make the actual money transfer pretty easy, but the onus is still on you to figure out who owes what—and, if you’re the generous friend who always tosses down your credit card, you know that your expectation of getting paid back isn’t always fulfilled.

Splitwise is a free app that helps you organize all of your shared expenses. First, you create a group of people, which you can categorize as “Apartment,” “House,” “Trip,” or “Other.” From there, all you have to do is enter your charges and specify how you’d like them to be split, and the app does the rest.

According to Lifehacker, you can divide bills equally, by percentage, or by amount, and you can even divide a bill equally and then adjust it so someone is paying a little more. In a nutshell, no bill-splitting scenario is too complicated for Splitwise. What if two people split your dinner check between their credit cards, but five people were at dinner? Include all five people in your group, indicate which two paid, and Splitwise will tell you how much the other three owe each of them.

Not only will the app keep you from getting confused or shortchanged, it’ll also keep track of your cumulative expenses so that you and your buddies don’t have to swap sums back and forth every time you have a drink on vacation. If your roommate covers the brunch bill on Saturday morning, for example, but you pay for concert tickets on Saturday night, Splitwise will just subtract your brunch IOU from the ticket expense, and your roommate pays the difference.

You can also upload images of receipts, set up recurring charges, and pay users through the app via Venmo or PayPal.

In addition to saving time and effort, Splitwise gets rid of the awkward gray area when it comes to deciding if things are even. Buying your friend a cup of coffee or a movie ticket isn’t usually a big deal, but those instances can leave you constantly feeling like people owe you money, or worse—wondering if other people feel like you owe them money. With Splitwise, you’ll actually know.

Download: iOS, Android

[h/t Lifehacker]

A MoviePass Security Gaffe Leaves Tens of Thousands of Accounts Exposed

zhuzhu/iStock via Getty Images
zhuzhu/iStock via Getty Images

When MoviePass launched a $9.95 subscription service in 2017, it was heralded as nothing less than a revolution in the moviegoing experience. The monthly fee allowed once-daily admission to first-run theatrical films at all of the major chains. Roughly 1 million people signed up for the app in the first four months alone. But AMC and other exhibitors resisted the business plan, leading to dwindling benefits and bad press.

Now, MoviePass is dealing with another issue: Leaving the customer card numbers of at least 58,000 users, plus many credit card numbers, easily accessible on a server.

According to TechCrunch, the data was first discovered by Dubai-based security firm SpiderSilk and security researcher Mossab Hussein. The cards were left unencrypted and available to review on the server without the need for a password. MoviePass cards are issued by Mastercard and operate like conventional debit cards, with pre-loaded balances that pay the full admission price at theater chains. The unsecured server also had conventional credit card information for customers that are used to pay the MoviePass subscription. These records included billing addresses. TechCrunch stated that among the records they reviewed, some contained enough information to make fraudulent purchases.

The database was taken offline this week, but it’s believed it had been open and accessible for months. Security researcher Nitish Shah said he discovered the database earlier in the year, wrote MoviePass to warn them, but received no reply. In a statement, MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe said the company was looking into it and would notify affected customers. In the interim, it's probably wise for MoviePass subscribers to monitor affiliated credit cards for any suspicious charges.

[h/t Gizmodo]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER