The Internet Is Obsessed With Laila, a Chubby Florida Cat Who Got Sent to ‘Fat Camp’

Nils Jacobi/iStock via Getty Images Plus
Nils Jacobi/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The obesity epidemic is a major concern for bipeds, and our four-legged companions are following the trend. Pet obesity is on the upswing, and it certainly worried the owners of Laila, a chubby Florida feline whose weight loss journey at kitty fat camp is being chronicled on social media.

Fox 35 Orlando reports the 23-pound cat’s obsession with food prevented her from running or jumping normally. Her owners, Lee and Sidney Ferinden, think her constant eating stems from the fact that she was nearly starving when they rescued her as a kitten. After bringing the weighty matter to the attention of a vet, Laila was introduced to a fitness program at the University of Florida.

One of her exercises involves walking on a treadmill—a surprisingly difficult task, since Laila seems more interested in lying down on it and getting her tummy rubbed.

Swimming is another part of her weekly workout, and the Ferindens report that Laila actually likes it. So far, Laila has already lost 2 pounds—a positive indication that she’s headed in a healthier direction. Judging from her active GoFundMe page, Laila has plenty of fans rooting for her success.

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Massive Swarms of Migrating Dragonflies Are So Large They’re Popping Up on Weather Radar

emprised/iStock via Getty Images
emprised/iStock via Getty Images

What do Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Ohio all have in common? Epic swarms of dragonflies, among other things.

WSLS-TV reports that this week, weather radar registered what might first appear to be late summer rain showers. Instead, the green blotches turned out to be swarms of dragonflies—possibly green darners, a type of dragonfly that migrates south during the fall.

Norman Johnson, a professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, told CNN that although these swarms happen occasionally, they’re definitely not a regular occurrence. He thinks the dragonflies, which usually prefer to travel alone, may form packs based on certain weather conditions. If that sounds vague, it’s because it is: Johnson said that entomologists haven’t worked out all the details when it comes to dragonfly migration. They do know that the airborne insects cover an average of eight miles per day, while some overachievers can fly as far as 86.

Based on the radar footage shared by the National Weather Service’s Cleveland Office, the dragonfly clouds seem almost menacing. But, while swarms of any insect species aren’t exactly delightful, these creatures are both harmless and surprisingly beautiful, at least up close. Anna Barnett, a resident of Jeromesville, Ohio, even told CNN that witnessing the natural phenomenon was “amazing!”

Amazing as it may be to see, it’s hard to hear news about unpredictable animal behavior without wondering if it’s related in some way to Earth’s rising temperatures. After all, climate change has already affected wasps in Alabama, polar bears in Russia, and no doubt countless other animal species around the world.

[h/t WSLW-TV]

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