11 Tips for Traveling With Your Pet, According to a Veterinarian

iStock/walik
iStock/walik

Planning a trip can be stressful no matter the circumstances. When you want to include the family pet in your plans, you have a whole new list of things to worry about, including packing the right equipment, checking your hotel’s pet policy, and making sure your pet meets the travel criteria for the state or country you’re visiting. But if you’re aware of the steps you need to take, traveling with your pet can be a positive experience for all involved. Mental Floss spoke with Dr. Danielle Bernal, a veterinarian with Wellness Natural Pet Food, about what to keep in mind before hitting the road with your furry companion.

1. Keep pets comfortable in a travel crate.

You may be tempted to give your pet plenty of room on long car trips, but giving them a confined space that’s their own is usually the better option. According to Bernal, “It’s often better for the dog, because if they’re crate-trained, that’s their area of security.” It’s safer as well: An animal is much better off in a durable crate than it is sliding around untethered in the backseat of a car.

2. Don’t fill your pet's crate with toys.

Giving your pet lots of toys to play with at home is a good thing—but on long car trips it's a different story. Packing every toy your pet loves into their crate takes up what little room they have to themselves. If the crate is too full, it can be impossible for them to move around and adjust their position. “Yes, you want them to be comfortable, but also you don’t want to fill that crate up,” Bernal says. “So almost less is more.”

3. Make sure you have all the correct paperwork.

If you’re planning a long trip with your pet, you won’t get very far without the right paperwork. Many places require incoming pets to have an up-to-date health certificate signed by an accredited veterinarian. Before signing the documents, vets will confirm that your pet is healthy and up-to-date on all vaccinations required by the receiving state or country. If you’re flying, contact the airline to see if any other special paperwork is required to transport your animal.

4. Make it easier to find your pet if they get lost.

An unfamiliar location miles away from home is the worst place to lose your pet. Before your trip, make sure they’re easy to find in case the worst happens. Implanting a microchip under your dog or cat’s skin will make them trackable no matter where in the country they wander off to. If you’re not willing to commit to that procedure, at least make sure the contact information on their tags is up-to-date—that way, they're more likely to be returned to satefy if someone finds them.

5. Skip a meal on travel days.

No matter how accommodating you are to your pet, some anxiety on their part is inevitable. Bernal says a common symptom of this is stress diarrhea—which is the last thing pet owners want to deal with on a long car or plane ride. Even if your pet doesn't seem stressed before the trip, plain old motion sickness can upset your animal’s stomach rather quickly. Bernal recommends feeding them less than you usually would prior to traveling to avoid future accidents: “If you have a pet you know has those sensitivities, I would keep their tummy empty. It will be good for the pet and it will be nicer for everyone in the car too.” That doesn’t mean you should starve your pet if they’re begging for food; just skip the last meal you would normally feed them before beginning your journey.

6. Keep your pet hydrated.

Without regular access to water whenever they need it, pets can get easily dehydrated when traveling. Keep this in mind when traveling and pack extra water for your four-legged passenger. Allowing animals to self-regulate their water intake, perhaps by attaching a bowl to the inside of their crate, is ideal, but if that’s not possible, stop frequently to give them a chance to drink. Another way to keep them feeling good is to feed them wet food instead of dry; according to Bernal, the water content in wet food can help hydrate pets.

7. keep them occupied with a toy.

If you can only give your pet one toy on a long trip, choose something that will keep them busy for as long as possible. Bernal recommends puzzle dog toys like those you’ll find from the pet brand Kong. When your dog is preoccupied on reaching the treat inside the toy, it's harder for them to focus on anything else—including the stress of traveling to a new place.

8. Never leave your pet in a car alone.

Hopefully this is common sense for most pet parents, but Bernal emphasizes that this is the most important thing to remember when traveling with an animal—especially during the summer months. “Don’t leave them in a locked car,” she says. “It takes seven minutes for them to basically move into a situation where it becomes fatal.” It doesn’t matter if you crack a window or if you’re only stepping out of your car for a few minutes. If it’s a hot day, dogs should never be left alone in a vehicle. “We need to make sure that all pet parents are aware of that,” Bernal says.

9. Choose pet-friendly accommodations.

You may love your pet, but that doesn’t mean the owner of the hotel or Airbnb where you’re staying will love them, too; be mindful of this when booking accommodations for your trip. There are plenty of hotels that offer perks for pet owners, like doggie daycare, but even if a place doesn’t advertise their pet policy, it doesn’t hurt to call and ask (or simply confirm what you're reading online so that there are no surprises when you arrive).

10. Make your travel destination feel like home.

Your pet’s crate may not be the best place for all their toys, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pack them when going on vacation. Bringing their favorite items from home can make pets feel more at ease when they arrive at an unfamiliar destination. “Pack things that are familiar to them, so when they arrive at a new spot they’re like: ‘Ok, I feel a lot more comfortable,’” Bernal says. “It helps with their anxiety.” And you shouldn’t stop at toys: Packing their bed, bowl, and blanket can have the same calming effect.

11. Know when it's best to leave your pet at home.

Not every vacation is improved by bringing your pet along. If you plan on spending most of your trip in places that don’t allow animals, like museums, restaurants, and theme parks, it may be best to leave your pet at a kennel or with a sitter or trusted friend. Even if the vacation is pet-friendly, it may not be a good fit for an animal that’s especially anxious. “If you have a nervous dog, he’s actually going to be happier in his home if someone just comes in and feeds him,” Bernal says. Your pet will forgive you for having fun without them.

10 Terrifyingly Huge Birds You Should Know

AndreaWillmore/iStock via Getty Images
AndreaWillmore/iStock via Getty Images

They’re gigantic, they’re often defensive, and you wouldn’t want to run into them in a zoo after hours. Meet a few of the world’s biggest birds with attitude, from flightless giants to modern-day pterodactyls.

1. Ostrich

Everyone knows that the ostrich is the world’s biggest bird, weighing an average of 230 pounds and standing 7 feet tall (and some individuals can grow up to 9 feet). They can also chase you down: Ostriches are the fastest species on two legs, with a top speed of about 43 mph. They can maintain a swift 30 mph pace for 10 miles, making them the marathon champs of the avian world.

2. Southern Cassowary

Often called the most dangerous bird on Earth, in addition to being one of the planet’s biggest birds, the southern cassowary is roughly 150 pounds of mean. On each foot is a 5-inch claw that cassowaries use to defend themselves. At least two people have been kicked to death by cassowaries, the most recent being a Florida man who unwisely kept one of the birds as a pet.

3. Emu

Emu with eggs
JohnCarnemolla/iStock via Getty Images

Like a smaller, shaggier ostrich, the 5- to 6-foot emu is the second-largest bird on Earth (as well as a goofy spokesbird for insurance). During the breeding season, female emus fight enthusiastically over unattached males. But the results of this mating ritual are impressive: clutches of forest-green, oval eggs that resemble giant avocados.

4. Greater Rhea

This flightless bird is named for the Titan goddess Rhea, who gave birth to all of the Olympian gods and goddesses in Greek mythology. At up to 5 feet tall and 66 pounds, the greater rhea may not seem like as much of a terror as the ostrich. But it gathers in massive flocks of up to 100 birds during the non-breeding season, so watch out if you happen to be in its South American habitat.

5. Dalmatian Pelican

Dalmatian pelicans
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How scary can a pelican be, you ask? When it stands almost 6 feet tall, weighs 33 pounds, and has a wingspan of 9 feet—all traits of the Dalmatian pelican—it's pretty petrifying. These scruffy-feathered monsters, native to Europe and Asia, breed in colonies of up to 250 pairs and can gulp impressive mouthfuls of fish in one go.

6. Mute Swan

One of the heaviest flying birds, mute swans look harmless as they glide over ponds, lakes, and rivers. But mute swans are far from silent when defending their families and territory. Male swans warn interlopers that they’re getting too close with a hiss, then can launch a straight-up assault, bashing the intruder with their wings. They’ll even attack kayakers, canoeists, and people just minding their own business.

7. Andean Condor

Andean condor
Donyanedomam/iStock via Getty Images

This freakishly big vulture isn’t satisfied with just any carrion—it prefers large carcasses like cattle and deer for dinner. Maintaining its average weight of 25 pounds requires a lot of calories, after all. Its wingspan is slightly less than its northern cousin, the California condor, but it still reaches a dramatic 9 to 10 feet.

8. Cinereous Vulture

Another big bird with a 10-foot wingspan, this Old World vulture has excellent vision to spot carrion while it flies, and a featherless head that resists the accumulation of gore when it feeds. Though it’s intimidating to look at, the cinereous vulture plays an important role in its ecosystem by cleaning up roadkill and other dead animals.

9. Marabou Stork

Marabou stork
Sander Meertins/iStock via Getty Images

As if its red-tinged wattle, black back, and dagger-esque bill weren’t alarming enough, the marabou stork is sometimes called the “undertaker bird” thanks to its Dracula-like appearance. It also eats other birds. The largest verified wingspan on a marabou stork measured 10.5 feet, though unverified reports cited a specimen with 13.3-foot span.

10. Shoebill

Shoebill storks may not be the tallest, heaviest, or widest-winged birds, but just look at that death stare. On top of having a nutcracker for a face, the 5-foot-tall shoebill leads a fearsome lifestyle. It stands absolutely still for hours to hunt prey, watching for lungfish or baby crocodiles, then spreads its wings and collapses over it while trapping the target in its bill.

Scientists Capture Video of Deepstaria, a Rarely Seen, Shapeshifting Jellyfish

OET/NautilusLive
OET/NautilusLive

Millions of years of evolution taking place beneath the sea's surface have produced some bizarre animals. Jellyfish are among the oldest—and strangest—of the bunch. Some have "transient" anuses that only form when necessary, and others can renew their life cycles indefinitely. Little is known about Deepstaria, a jellyfish recently spotted by the crew of the Nautilus research vessel in the central Pacific Ocean, but as the video below shows, it's no less unusual than other species of jellyfish.

As Live Science reports, scientists aboard the Nautilus were scanning the seafloor about halfway between the U.S. and Australia when they spotted a spooky-looking creature hovering in front of them. It soon became clear that cosplaying a ghost wasn't all it could do. The jelly unfurled its sheet-like bell to reveal a geometric mesh membrane used to distribute nutrients throughout its body—a telltale sign of Deepstaria. It spends the rest of the video putting on a show for its guests, transforming from something resembling a crumpled plastic bag to a billowing blanket shape.

Deepstaria enigmatica was discovered by the Jacques Cousteau-designed Deepstar 4000 submersible—the vessel the species is named after—in the 1960s. It's only been spotted about a dozen times in the years since, and many details of how it lives remain a mystery to researchers.

Deepstaria's most distinctive feature is its massive, flowing bell. It lacks the tentacles most jellyfish use to wrangle prey, and scientists suspect it instead uses its bell as a net when hunting. The specimen captured in this video appears to be harboring a stowaway: a bright-red, living isopod suspended inside the bell. It isn't clear if the creature hitched a ride on purpose to evade more ferocious predators, if it's some type of parasite, or if it's the jellyfish's lunch.

With so many undiscovered and understudied species living in the sea, the Nautilus research vessel is frequently stumbling upon extraordinary examples of ocean life. In 2016 alone, it recorded footage of a googly-eyed stubby squid and a mysterious purple orb.

[h/t Live Science]

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