Rare Audio Clip of Frida Kahlo Discovered in Mexican Sound Library

Sean Gallup/Getty Images
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Even if they're not experts in art, many people are familiar with Frida Kahlo's most famous paintings. The Mexican artist's style, quotes, and artwork are still iconic 65 years after her death, but few people know what she sounded like. As CNN reports, the National Sound Library of Mexico recently announced the discovery of what could be the only surviving recording of her voice.

The clip comes from the 1955 pilot of the radio show El Bachiller. The episode profiles Diego Rivera, a muralist and Kahlo's on-again-off-again husband. In one section, Kahlo can be heard reciting a text entitled "Portrait of Diego" that poetically describes the appearance and temperament of her spouse.

Kahlo had already died when the episode aired, and the radio show notes that the voice being broadcast belongs to a painter "who no longer exists." The original recording of her voice likely dates back to 1954 or 1953 (she died in July 1954).

In a press release, the director of the National Sound Library of Mexico Pável Granados said that audio of Frida Kahlo is one of the most common requests they receive. The authenticity of the tape has yet to be confirmed, and authorities are currently investigating to see if the voice in the recording really belonged to the artist.

Surviving audio of Kahlo may be rare, but the painter left behind many artworks and writings that paint a rich picture of her life. Here are some facts about the icon.

[h/t CNN]

Salvador Dalí's Tarot Card Deck Is Coming Back, Courtesy of TASCHEN

TASCHEN
TASCHEN

Looking for a tarot deck with a little surreal flair? You’re in luck: Beginning in November, art publisher TASCHEN will sell a set of tarot cards drawn by Salvador Dalí, the Spanish artist famous for his paintings of melting clocks.

Dalí was originally commissioned by producer Albert R. Broccoli to design a set of tarot cards for the 1973 James Bond movie Live and Let Die, Smith Journal reports (Jane Seymour’s character, a fortune teller, used them in the film). But the arrangement fell apart when Dalí reportedly requested a much higher sum than Broccoli was prepared to pay. Broccoli later turned to artist Fergus Hall to create the tarot cards that were eventually shown in the film, but Dalí was far enough into the project that he finished all 78 cards.

Each of the cards in the finished deck shows off Dalí’s distinctive style—the Queen of Cups, for example, has a blue mustache and goatee, and the Death card shows a skull floating in a cypress tree. At least two of the cards (the Magician and the King of Pentacles) are self-portraits. The deck was originally published in a 1984 limited edition, but it’s since been re-released on a few occasions.

The latest edition is scheduled for release on November 15. The full set, including all 78 cards and a companion book, costs $60 and can be purchased here.

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Meet the Artist Who Has Been Sketching New York City Subway Stations for 40 Years

art2002/iStock via Getty Images
art2002/iStock via Getty Images

The aesthetic appeal of New York City's subway system is often hidden behind a layer of grime or simply ignored by commuters. Philip Ashforth Coppola has been admiring those finer points of public transit for more than 40 years.

The New Jersey-based artist began sketching and researching the subway’s interior in 1978, Atlas Obscura reports. His pen drawings are in black and white, but Coppola notes the exact colors and the historic significance behind each. The beaver plaques at the Astor Place station, for example, represents real estate mogul John Jacob Astor, who first made his fortune in the fur trade.

“I’ve spent a lot of years on it,” he says in the 2005 documentary One Track Mind (also the title of his 2018 book). “But I haven’t accomplished that much.” The former art student is selling himself short: Coppola has drawn at least 110 of the city’s 472 stations, resulting in 2000 sketches spanning 41 notebooks.

In an interview with WNYC, Coppola admitted that he wasn’t a train enthusiast as a child. “When I was a kid, I liked to draw pictures and tell stories or write them down,” he says. “That sort of ... filed into this new adventure.”

Coppola sees the drawings as a way to preserve the subway system's overlooked details. “The idea is to make a record of what we’ve got, before more of it is lost," he says.

Even irritable commuters realized the significance of his endeavors. “People were just thunderstruck when they saw [Coppola’s] artwork,” says Jeremy Workman, the documentary's director. “It reminded them of art they had seen themselves and maybe didn’t notice. We thought that was a powerful message: Reminding people of the beauty that’s right in front of their eyes.”

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