10 Surprising Facts About Animal Sex

iStock/Dias Studio
iStock/Dias Studio

Homo sapiens do not have a monopoly on strange sex. Peculiar mating rituals are prevalent throughout the animal kingdom. While writing my book Sex Weird-o-Pedia, these were the 10 most interesting animal sex facts I came across.

1. Turtle mating sounds make for good special effects.

It turns out that animal mating sounds can be really useful for capturing people’s attention. When the filmmakers of Jurassic Park wanted to create velociraptor sounds, they used recordings of tortoises getting it on.

2. Sharks have versatile birthing methods.

Rare close-up encounter with wild endangered species Zebra Leopard Shark (Stegostoma fasciatum
iStock/Placebo365

Australian scientists claim to have found a shark that gives virgin births. They studied a female zebra shark named Leonie, who laid eggs despite not being around a male shark in three years. Several years before her virgin birth, Leonie gave birth after mating with a male shark. She is believed to be the first known shark to reproduce both sexually and asexually.

3. Worms have really long dry spells.

You think it's been a long time since you've been intimate with someone? You've got nothing on worms. After sequencing the DNA of asexual translucent worms, NYU researchers discovered that one species, Diploscapter pachys, had not had sex for about 18 million years. This makes Diploscapter pachys one of the oldest known asexual species.

4. Fine fragrances turn big cats on.

Calvin Klein colognes have sex appeal to animals, too. Captive tigers and jaguars have become stimulated by the brand’s Obsession for Men scent. Forest rangers have used the scent to lure tigers out of the wild.

5. Barnacles have adaptable penises.

A close-up of barnacles on a rock
iStock/Photoshopped

Barnacles may have the most interesting penises in the animal kingdom. Their penises can stretch up to eight times the length of their body. And while many species' manhoods can change size, few can alter their shape. But researchers in Alberta found that barnacles that live in gentle waters have long and thin penises that are good for reach, while those in rough waters have short and wider penises that are better for holding off strong waves. The researchers then transported rough water barnacles to calmer waters and vice versa and found that after getting moved around, the barnacles adjusted their penis's shape to better fit their environment.

6. Water bugs mate loudly.

The water bug species Micronecta scholtzi are the loudest animal in the world relative to their size. The tiny critter reaches nearly 100 decibels when it rubs its penis against its abdomen. Basically, there is a rock concert going on whenever this bug releases a mating call.

7. Ducks defend themselves with their vaginas.

Duck penises can be terrifying: They are long and corkscrew-shaped and they can be used like a lasso to pull in females who are trying to escape unwanted advances. To fend off unwelcome mating attempts from overeager males, female ducks have evolved vaginas that twist in the opposite direction of their male counterparts’s corkscrew penises. Discover magazine referred to duck vaginas as “organic chastity belts."

8. Most birds don’t have penises.

Close-up of an ostrich
iStock/sasapanchenko

Just 3 percent of bird species have penises. Ostriches and ducks have them, but eagles and penguins do not. When birds get erections, their penises fill up with lymph fluid instead of blood. Birds without penises transfer sperm from male to female via what is known as a cloacal kiss.

9. Male birds are desperate to impress potential mates.

As long as humans have been on Earth, guys have done incredibly stupid things to try to impress women. Male birds are not immune to this dynamic.

Little birds like chickadees will group together to take on larger predators. It has generally been assumed that they do this for protection purposes, but researchers in Brazil came to a different conclusion: The researchers created a few fake owls, one from a species that regularly eats smaller birds and another from a less threatening owl species. They found that across 79 different species of small birds, the less threatening owl was attacked more often by the smaller birds. Their conclusion was that the small birds used the weaker opponent as an opportunity to showcase their defense skills to potential mates.

10. Unlike humans, animals have gotten frisky in space.

According to NASA, no humans have ever had sex in space. But other animal species have been more active with their sexuality and reproductivity outside our atmosphere.

The first pregnant mammals to fly in outer space aboard a U.S. spacecraft were rats, and frogs have conceived in orbit.

In an effort to better understand how reproduction works in the absence of gravity, Russia’s space agency launched five geckos into orbit in 2014 so that they could observe how the lizards had sex in space. Sadly, the geckos froze to death before they touched back down to Earth.

In 2018, NASA scientists began a mission that involved sending human and bull sperm to outer space. Their intention was to study how microgravity affects the motility of sperm cells. Because if humans are to ever colonize space, we must boldly bone where no one has boned before.

Ross Benes is the author of the new book Sex Weird-o-Pedia: The Ultimate Book of Shocking, Scandalous, and Incredibly Bizarre Sex Facts.

Fish Tube: How the 'Salmon Cannon' Works and Why It's Important

PerfectStills/iStock via Getty Images
PerfectStills/iStock via Getty Images

If you’ve been on the internet at any point in the past week, you’ve certainly come across footage of wildlife conservationists stuffing salmon into a giant plastic tube and shuttling them over obstacles. It’s so bizarre—even by the already loose standards of the web—that it briefly ignited discussions over fish welfare, its purpose, and the seeming desire of people to be similarly transported through a pneumatic tunnel into a new life.

Naturally, the “salmon cannon” has a mission beyond amusing the internet. The system was created by Whooshh Innovations, a company that essentially adopted the same kind of transportation system featuring pressurized tubing that's used in banking. Initially, the system was intended to transport fruit over long distances without bruising. At some point, engineers figured they could do the same for fish.

The fish payload is secured at the entrance of the tube—acceptable species can weigh up to 34 pounds—and moves through a smooth, soft plastic tube that conforms to their body shape. Air pressure behind them keeps them moving. The fish are jettisoned between 16 and 26 feet per second to a new location, where they emerge relatively unscathed. Because there’s no need for a water column, the tubing can cover most terrain at virtually any height.

The tubing solution is a human answer to a human problem: dams. With fish largely confined to still bodies of water thanks to dams and facing obstacles swimming upstream to migrate and spawn, fish need some kind of assistance. In the past, “fish ladders” have helped fish move upstream by providing ascending steps they can flop on, but not all fish can navigate such terrain. Another system, trapping and hauling fish like cargo, results in disoriented fish who can even forget how to swim. The Whooshh system, which has been in used in Washington state for at least five years, allows for expedient fish export with an injury rate as little as 3 percent, although study results have varied.

The video features manual insertion of the fish. In the wild, Whooshh counts on fish making semi-voluntary entries into the tubing. Once they swim into an enclosure, they’re curious enough about the tube to go inside.

If all goes well, the system could help salmon be reintroduced to the Upper Columbia River in Washington, where the population has been depleted by dams. Testing of the device there is awaiting approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

[h/t Popular Mechanics]

Virginia Zoo Is Auctioning Off the Chance to Name Its New Red Panda Triplets

bbossom/iStock via Getty Images
bbossom/iStock via Getty Images

The red panda population at the Virginia Zoo grew significantly earlier this summer, The Virginian-Pilot reports. On June 18, mother Masu and father Timur welcomed a brood of triplets into the world, bringing their total number of offspring up to five. The three red panda babies are currently without names, but the zoo is giving a few lucky bidders the chance to change that.

Red pandas are endangered, with fewer than 10,000 of them living in their natural habitat in the Eastern Himalayas. Red panda breeding programs, like the one at the Virginia Zoo in Norfolk, are a way for conservationists to rebuild the species's dwindling numbers.

In 2017, Masu relocated to Virginia from the Denver Zoo as a juvenile. Zookeepers paired her with a male red panda there named Timur, and in June 2018, she delivered twin cubs named Adam and Freddie. Red pandas typically breed in the spring and summer months and usually have just two babies at a time. But when Masu gave birth again this past June, she had three tiny cubs.

The three new red panda babies each weighed about 5 ounces when they were born and weigh roughly a pound today. Masu has been moved to a private, climate-controlled den to care for her young and will be returned to her original exhibit with her cubs sometime this fall.

By the time they make their debut, the youngest red pandas at the Virginia Zoo will have names, chosen not by the zoo, but by members of the public. Starting yesterday, August 19, and ending August 30, the zoo is holding an online auction for the naming rights of each of the three red panda cubs. As of press time, the honor of naming the two boy red pandas has already been sold for $2500 each, and the current bid for the girl stands at $1000. All the money that's raised will be donated to the Zoo’s conservation partner, the Red Panda Network.

Perhaps due to the results of previous public naming contests, the Zoo did lay out a few stipulations for the winning bidders. It won't accept any repeat names of red pandas that have lived there in the past. Additionally, "any racial, religious or ethnic slurs, explicit language, obscene content, reference to alcohol, drugs or other illicit substances or otherwise unlawful, inappropriate, objectionable, or offensive content" will be rejected. All name submissions from the winners are due to the zoo by September 9.

[h/t The Virginian-Pilot]

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