The FBI Once Tested Hair to Determine If It Belonged to Bigfoot

iStock/RichVantage
iStock/RichVantage

For decades, humans have pondered whether a towering, hairy, bipedal creature roams our forests. Some call him Bigfoot. Some refer to him as sasquatch. Normally, his existence is debated only among paranormal enthusiasts. But thanks to some newly uncovered government files, we now know the Federal Bureau of Investigation once performed some forensic testing to see if Bigfoot was living among us.

According to the Seattle Times, the agency was contacted by a Bigfoot investigator named Peter C. Byrne in 1976 with a request to test a hair sample Byrne had collected in Oregon. The 15 hairs were attached to a small piece of skin, which Byrne and his colleagues at the Bigfoot Information Center and Exhibition were unable to identify. The hairs came from a search of a site where two U.S. Forest Service employees claimed to have seen the creature. In addition to the hair, there were 14-inch footprints.

Incredibly, the FBI was amenable to the request. Jay Cochran Jr., assistant director for the FBI’s scientific and technical services division, wrote Byrne and said that although the agency is interested primarily in criminal matters, he would make an exception. Though their office may have doubted the existence of Bigfoot, it had been asked to make inquiries in the past. It was possible they wanted to settle the matter once and for all.

If Byrne held out hope his sample might produce a definitive answer as to Bigfoot's existence, he was disappointed. Cochran revealed to him that the hairs came from a deer, although the correspondence was lost in transit and Byrne never actually read the reply until this past week. Speaking with The Washington Post, the 93-year-old expressed slight disappointment. "If the FBI says it's deer hair, I guess that's it," he said. "For now."

[h/t Seattle Times]

Is There An International Standard Governing Scientific Naming Conventions?

iStock/Grafissimo
iStock/Grafissimo

Jelle Zijlstra:

There are lots of different systems of scientific names with different conventions or rules governing them: chemicals, genes, stars, archeological cultures, and so on. But the one I'm familiar with is the naming system for animals.

The modern naming system for animals derives from the works of the 18th-century Swedish naturalist Carl von Linné (Latinized to Carolus Linnaeus). Linnaeus introduced the system of binominal nomenclature, where animals have names composed of two parts, like Homo sapiens. Linnaeus wrote in Latin and most his names were of Latin origin, although a few were derived from Greek, like Rhinoceros for rhinos, or from other languages, like Sus babyrussa for the babirusa (from Malay).

Other people also started using Linnaeus's system, and a system of rules was developed and eventually codified into what is now called the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). In this case, therefore, there is indeed an international standard governing naming conventions. However, it does not put very strict requirements on the derivation of names: they are merely required to be in the Latin alphabet.

In practice a lot of well-known scientific names are derived from Greek. This is especially true for genus names: Tyrannosaurus, Macropus (kangaroos), Drosophila (fruit flies), Caenorhabditis (nematode worms), Peromyscus (deermice), and so on. Species names are more likely to be derived from Latin (e.g., T. rex, C. elegans, P. maniculatus, but Drosophila melanogaster is Greek again).

One interesting pattern I've noticed in mammals is that even when Linnaeus named the first genus in a group by a Latin name, usually most later names for related genera use Greek roots instead. For example, Linnaeus gave the name Mus to mice, and that is still the genus name for the house mouse, but most related genera use compounds of the Greek-derived root -mys (from μῦς), which also means "mouse." Similarly, bats for Linnaeus were Vespertilio, but there are many more compounds of the Greek root -nycteris (νυκτερίς); pigs are Sus, but compounds usually use Greek -choerus (χοῖρος) or -hys/-hyus (ὗς); weasels are Mustela but compounds usually use -gale or -galea (γαλέη); horses are Equus but compounds use -hippus (ἵππος).

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

A Rare Blue Lobster Ended Up in a Cape Cod Restaurant

Richard wood, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Richard wood, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Lobsters have precious few defenses when it comes to being tossed in a vat of boiling water or on a grill and turned into dinner. They have not yet evolved into not being delicious. But sometimes, one lucky lobster can defy the odds and escape their sentence by virtue of a genetic defect that turns them blue.

According to MassLive, one such lobster has been given a reprieve at Arnold's Lobster & Clam Bar in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Named "Baby Blue," the crustacean arrived at the restaurant from the Atlantic and was immediately singled out for its distinctive appearance.

Blue lobsters are a statistical abnormality. It's estimated only one in every two million carry the defect that creates an excessive amount of protein that results in the color. A lobsterman named Wayne Nickerson caught one in Cape Cod in 2016. He also reported catching one in 1990. Greg Ward of Rye, New Hampshire caught one near the New Hampshire and Maine border in 2017.

Lobsters can show up in a variety of colors, including orange, yellow, a mixture of orange and black, white, and even take on a two-toned appearance, with the colors split down the middle. Blue is the most common, relatively speaking. A white (albino) specimen happens in only one out of 100 million lobsters. The majority have shells with yellow, blue, and red layers and appear brown until cooked, at which point the proteins in the shell fall off to reveal the red coloring.

It's an unofficial tradition that blue lobsters aren't served up to curious customers. Instead, they're typically donated to local aquariums. Nathan Nickerson, owner Arnold's, said he plans on doing the same.

[h/t MassLive]

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