Michelin's Puncture-Proof Tire Prototype Could Make Flats a Thing of the Past

Steve Fecht for General Motors
Steve Fecht for General Motors

Flat tires have long been the biggest plague facing motorists. In 2017, research conducted by auto experts AAA found that 28 percent of new-model cars didn’t even come with a spare tire in the event of a tire failure, with manufacturers choosing to eliminate them to reduce costs and improve fuel efficiency. In 2016, the AAA estimated that it assisted 450,000 drivers with flats and repairs. Loss of air pressure or simply driving over a piercing object can blow out a tire, causing delays, accidents, and emergency stops into repair facilities.

Tire manufacturer Michelin is looking to change that. In collaboration with General Motors, the company is working on a tire named Uptis (Unique Puncture-Proof Tire System) that doesn’t use air and cannot be rendered flat. The design, which would be the first airless tire system for passenger cars, debuted at this week’s Movin’ On Summit in Montreal.

Though the tire has conventional treads, the middle layer is made of composite rubber and resin-embedded fiberglass spokes. The spokes provide support for the treads and remove the need for air.

The two companies believe the Uptis will last longer than a regular tire because it cannot be worn down by being under or over-inflated. The design is also intended to be environmentally friendly, as it would reduce the number of tires thrown out due to damage. According to Michelin, 200 million tires are discarded every year.

The tires will be tested in a fleet of Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles later this year. If the trial goes well, Michelin expects they could be available on new General Motors vehicles by 2024. It’s not yet clear whether Michelin would sell the tires separately or if vehicles might need some kind of modified chassis in order to accommodate them.

[h/t WBTW]

Google Is Celebrating Friends's 25th Anniversary With Hilarious Easter Eggs

Getty Images
Getty Images

On September 22, the more-popular-than-ever show Friends turns 25 years old, and this pop culture milestone has generated all kinds of celebrations, like the release of Central Perk coffee, a LEGO set, a “How You Doin’?” T-shirt, a jewelry collection, a theatrical Friends marathon, and more. To properly prepare for the anniversary, you’ll probably want to head to Google to learn more about the show, right? Well, now the search engine giant is even getting in on the fun with some Friends-inspired Easter eggs. 

All you need to do is either Google your favorite character’s full name or the first name followed by “Friends.” Not to give too much away—it really is a nice surprise—but type in “Joey Tribbiani.” A pizza icon will appear under the Knowledge Panel (located beneath the picture) on the right side of the screen. Click on the pizza to see an animation, followed by one of Joey's most recognizable (and relatable) lines. To annoy coworkers, friends, family members, and/or anyone else in earshot, just keep clicking on the icon. 

But the best Easter egg pops up when you Google “Friends glossary.” At the top of the page, you'll get funny definitions for words like pivot, woopah, unagi, unfloopy, and plenty of other running jokes from the show. Between the glossary and the Easter eggs, you won’t be able to get “Smelly Cat” out of your head, but you'll at least wind up with a unique trifle recipe.

PopSockets Is Rolling Out a Line of Drink Holders

PopSockets
PopSockets

PopSockets have become something of a fidgeting consumer’s dream. The cute and accordion-esque accessory knob that attaches to phones allows for an improved grip and gives people something to noodle with. Now, the company is hoping you’ll recognize the value in having a PopSockets appliance for your hot and cold drinks.

The PopThirst Cup Sleeve and the PopThirst Can Holder resemble insulated sleeves you can purchase for beverages. But these sleeves have a socket for a PopGrip attachment, which you can thread between your fingers to make for a more secure grip. This might be beneficial in the car, where bumpy roads can prompt more spills.

A PopSockets PopThirst cup sleeve is pictured
PopSockets

Holding a drink with the PopGrip acting as a handle seems a little more precarious. Most people will not do this, but if they do, you will probably find the consequences on Instagram.

Since going on sale in 2014, PopSockets has become a phone accessory giant, moving 100 million units in 2018.

The PopThirst Cup Sleeve and Can Holder are both one-size-fits-all and retail for $15 each.

[h/t The Verge]

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