We’re Hiring a Social Media Editor/Manager

iStock/ComicSans
iStock/ComicSans

We're looking for a Social Media Editor to join the award-winning Mental Floss team in our New York City offices. Mental Floss has won Webby Awards (three!), lost ASME Awards (thrilled to be nominated!), and published 15 books and five board games. Our YouTube channel has 1.3 million subscribers, our Facebook page is liked by 2.4 million people, our Twitter feed has 685,000 followers, and we reach 13 million people a month through mentalfloss.com. Our goal is to find fascinating stories and bring them back to our readers. The kind of stories that readers will want to share, both via social media and beyond. Can you help us tell them?

Social Media Editor

The Social Media Editor will strengthen Mental Floss’s relationship with our current readership and, using both creative editorial knowledge and data analytics, help us find ways to introduce the brand to new audiences and markets. This person will be responsible for overseeing all of the brand’s social media accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and more.

In addition to bringing Mental Floss’s voice to both existing and emerging platforms, the Social Media Editor will:

  • Develop all social media strategies and audience engagement efforts;
  • Write, schedule, and publish captivating daily social content, with a focus on driving traffic and conversion and boosting audience engagement;
  • Interpret data and analytics to inform the content we create and promote, and submit detailed weekly and monthly social media performance reports;
  • Have impeccable writing skills, strong attention to detail, and a thorough knowledge of social media platforms and analytics;
  • Work with both editors and writers to track and suggest news stories and, if desired, have the chance to pitch and write stories for the site;
  • Help maintain current content partnerships with other organizations and influencers and look for additional opportunities that could be beneficial to the brand.

Ideal candidates will have:

  • At least 3 years previous social media experience at a publisher or entertainment brand (writing experience is a plus);
  • Fluency on all current social media platforms and eagerness to keep informed of all emerging platforms and digital tools;
  • Graphic design experience and intermediate/advanced level Photoshop skills;
  • Expertise in interpreting data to make metrics-based editorial and promotional decisions;
  • Clear understanding of key social metrics like CPM, reach, engagements, and how to analyze the outcomes and trends on social media pages;
  • Excellent time management skills, the ability to prioritize, and a high level of attention to detail;
  • Energetic, positive written voice;
  • Sound editorial judgment and ability to frame articles and videos for social promotion;
  • Ability to thrive in a fast-paced environment.

How to Apply

Just click here!

About Us

Blending the utility of education and joy of entertainment, Mental Floss is a community for curious minds. Our readers are passionate about learning but choosy with their attention. With a unique perspective that’s equal parts nerdy, worldly, and funny, we serve them by mining history, science, and culture for amazing facts and incredible stories, and packaging these in the most engaging forms that digital and social media offer today. We publish lists on pretty much every topic, from pop culture (“9 Unbelievable Movie Fan Theories That Turned Out to Be True”) and travel (“4 Spectacular Shipwrecks You Can Dive Near Chicago”) to science (“7 Amazing Facts About the Amygdala”) and food (“8 Forgotten Pie Recipes We Should Bring Back”). You can also find answers to life’s big questions (why isn’t there a B battery, and what are those white marks on your fingernails?!) and features about subjects like the hidden room behind Mount Rushmore; the history—and disappearance—of waterbeds; and the Apollo 11 astronaut who was allergic to the Moon.

Mental Floss was founded in a dorm room in 2001, and since then, we’ve grown to become a premier knowledge brand: 13 million users visit us online each month, our Facebook videos receive more than 30 million views, and our YouTube channel has more than 1 million subscribers.

You Can Buy an Extinct Volcano in Devon, England, for $60,000

People buy private islands, so why not buy a private volcano? Posbury Clump, a 250-million-year-old inactive volcano located in Devon, England, could be yours for the seemingly reasonable price of about $60,0000.

As Smithsonian reports, the volcano is 500 feet tall at its peak and surrounded by 4.9 acres of woodland (holly, oak, and ash trees), so you get sweeping views of the English countryside. The wooded outcrop and rolling hills make Posbury Clump look less like a volcano and more like a forest. Architects used the basalt stone from a former on-site quarry to build two of the area's most famous structures: Crediton Church and Medland Manor.

Because of its unique potassium-rich lava and other rare geological features, Posbury Clump has been designated a site of scientific interest, and as such has been formally marked for conservation.

Currently, only a few houses reside in the area, but Posbury—settled during the Iron Age, between about 800 BCE and AD 100—once housed convent Posbury St Francis, which was a part of the Posbury Clump estate. Those interested in possibly purchasing the volcano can contact agent Jackson-Stops. The cost is £50,000, or around $60,800, which is about what you'd pay to rent a studio apartment in New York City's Tribeca neighborhood for one year.

Just remember: If you do buy the volcano, you won't be the first person to purchase such a thing. According to Atlas Obscura, famed cartoonist-turned-oddities-collector Robert Ripley tried to purchase Parícutin (a baby volcano that suddenly sprung up from a cornfield in Mexico) in 1943, but was beaten to the punch by muralist Gerardo Murillo. Several individuals have privately owned New Zealand's active Whakaari volcano, and people privately own volcanoes in California and Oregon, too.

Reality Bites: A Humongous Tick That Chases Its Prey Has Been Found in the Netherlands

ironman100/iStock via Getty Images
ironman100/iStock via Getty Images

Humans have long been discouraged from tolerating the parasitic behavior of the tick. These pathogen-ridden arachnids latch onto their hosts for a blood buffet while transmitting a variety of diseases through their bites. Typically, ticks in infested areas wait for their hosts to stand or pass by and hope a bare leg presents itself.

But not all ticks are so passive. In the Netherlands, there have been reported sightings of Hyalomma marginatum, a kind of Andre the Giant of ticks that are twice the size of a more common species, Ixodes ricinus (sheep tick). Worse, they don’t sit idle. If they want to bite you, they’ll run after you.

The non-native species has been spotted twice in the past month. One was in Drenthe, a province in the northeastern part of the country, and the other was found in Achterhoek. They measure up to 0.2 inches but can grow to 0.7 inches when engorged with the blood of their hosts. The ticks are known to hide in brush. When they spot a potential meal, they run toward it. H. marginatum can detect a victim from up to 30 feet away and track it for 10 minutes before abandoning pursuit.

The species is typically found in northern Africa and Asia as well as parts of southern and eastern Europe. How did they get to the Netherlands? Researchers theorize they hitchhiked on migratory birds. And while their appearances have been scarce, they’re still a cause for concern. H. marginatum is known to harbor the virus that causes Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, which lists uncontrolled bleeding among its undesirable symptoms. The ticks, which were collected for analysis, tested negative for that disease but one was positive for the bacteria Rickettsia aeschlimannii, which causes spotted fever.

There have been no sightings of H. marginatum in the U.S., but native ticks remain a perpetual concern. If you’re outdoors, it’s always a good idea to monitor yourself for ticks and take steps to remove them safely.

[h/t LiveScience]

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