The 10 Smartest Online Courses You Can Sign Up For in June 2019

iStock/Deagreez
iStock/Deagreez

You don’t need scholarships, prior degrees, or even a physical classroom to further your education. Thanks to online education providers like edX, Udemy, and Coursera, you can take classes at home with just a computer and an internet connection. And with such vast course catalogs, the classes available online are often more diverse than what’s offered in a traditional academic setting. Here are some noteworthy courses you can sign up for in June 2019. (Both edX and Udemy are running sales for the beginning of June, so grab your spot soon.)

1. Hong Kong Cinema Through a Global Lens

Western viewers’ knowledge of Hong Kong cinema may be limited to Jackie Chan and Bruce Lee, but the region’s impact on film goes deep. "Hong Kong Cinema Through a Global Lens" will teach you about the techniques and stars behind the movies of Hong Kong as well as their relationship to globalization. Filmmaking, race, migration, and even martial arts choreography are all touched upon in the course.

Sign up on edX for free. The optional certificate costs $50. Use the code SUMMER20 for 20 percent off through June 5.

2. AI for Everyone

As artificial intelligence becomes more prevalent, it can be helpful for everyone—not just computer programmers and engineers—to learn about it. This class from Coursera focuses on the business aspects of AI. Lessons cover technical terminology, the limits and potential of AI, and the ethical and societal questions surrounding the emerging technology.

Sign up on Coursera for free. The optional certificate costs $49.

3. Learning How to Learn

This class from Coursera is a great first step for anyone looking to further their education. "Learning How to Learn: Powerful Mental Tools to Help You Master Tough Subjects" aides you in your quest for knowledge. The curriculum includes memorization techniques, tips for battling procrastination, and guidelines for taking tests. The strategies taught in this course can be applied to any subject, whether it's science, sports, or the arts.

Sign up on Coursera for free. The optional certificate costs $49.

4. Forensic Psychology

This is the course all your hours spent listening to true crime podcasts have prepared you for. After taking "Forensic Psychology" on Udemy, you’ll be able to separate the facts from the myths surrounding the field. The class covers legal matters, such as the reliability of eyewitness testimony in court, as well as criminal psychology and the motivations behind violent crimes.

Sign up on Udemy for $12 (regularly $134). A certificate of completion is included in the price.

5. Cookie Decorating Season By Season

Some impressive cookie decorating techniques may be all it takes to push your baking game to the next level. In "Cookie Decorating Season by Season," cookie designer Annie York equips you with tips and tricks you can use to make fun, festive treats for any occasion. The course comes with access to free video lessons; all you have to provide are the icing and baked goods.

Sign up on Bluprint. The individual course is free, or you can get access to this and many other courses on the site with an $8 per month subscription.

6. The Science of Happiness at Work

There are already several online courses devoted to the science of happiness and well-being. This three-course program offered by UC Berkeley through edX focuses specifically on the science of being happy at work. Learn how to practice mindfulness, deal with stress, and build positive relationships at your workplace by signing up for this program.

Sign up for the three-course program on edX for $402.30, professional certificate included. Use the code SUMMER20 for 20 percent off through June 5.

7. Contemporary Manuscript Illumination of Herat

Herat, Afghanistan, is known for its stunning illuminated manuscripts. This course will teach you about the tradition of the art form in the ancient city while covering the technical aspects of how to make one. You’ll come away from the course with your very own illuminated manuscript you designed and decorated at home.

Sign up on edX for free.

8. Learn Ethical Hacking From Scratch

If you’re interested in hacking but have no intention of breaking the law, learn how to hack the ethical way. "Learn Ethical Hacking From Scratch" teaches you how to infiltrate networks and systems like a skilled black-hat hacker, and then shows you how to use that information to detect similar attacks and secure yourself against them. Lessons start at the beginner level, so you don’t need to be a computer whiz to enroll.

Sign up on Udemy for $12 (regularly $195). A certificate of completion is included in the price.

9. Writing Short Stories: The Essential Guide

Experiencing writer’s block? This course from Udemy may be what finally pushes you to get your story down on paper. Regardless of your experience level, you can sign up for the class and learn the basics of writing short fiction, from developing characters to finding an ending for your story.

Sign up on Udemy for $12 (regularly $95).

10. Origins of the Human Mind

The lessons in this course lean on both psychology and primatology. Comparative cognitive science is an area of study that looks at the cognitive qualities of modern primates to better understand how the brain evolved in human beings. By showing you how chimpanzees think and learn, the class aims to teach you something new about your own cognitive abilities.

Sign up on edX for free. The optional certificate costs $50. Use the code SUMMER20 for 20 percent off through June 5.

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7 Timeless Facts About Paul Rudd

Rich Fury, Getty Images
Rich Fury, Getty Images

Younger fans may know Paul Rudd as Ant-Man, one of the newest members of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. However, the actor has been a Hollywood mainstay for half his life.

Rudd's breakout role came in 1995’s Clueless, where he played Josh, Alicia Silverstone's charming love interest in Amy Heckerling's beloved spin on Jane Austen's Emma. In the 2000s, Rudd became better known for his comedic work when he starred in movies like Wet Hot American Summer (2001), Anchorman (2004), The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005), Knocked Up (2007), and I Love You, Man (2009).

It wasn’t until 2015 that Rudd stepped into the ever-growing world of superhero movies when he was cast as Scott Lang, a.k.a. Ant-Man, and became part of the MCU.

Rudd has proven he can take on any part, serious or goofy. More amazingly, he never seems to age. But in honor of (what is reportedly) his 50th birthday on April 6, here are some things you might not have known about the star.

1. Paul Rudd is technically Paul Rudnitzky.

Though Paul Rudd was born in Passaic, New Jersey, both of his parents hail from London—his father was from Edgware and his mother from Surbiton. Both of his parents were descendants of Jewish immigrants who moved to England from from Russia and Poland. Rudd’s last name was actually Rudnitzky, but it was changed by his grandfather.

2. His parents are second cousins.

In a 2017 episode of Finding Your Roots, Rudd learned that his parents were actually second cousins. Rudd responded to the discovery in typical comedic fashion: "Which explains why I have six nipples." He also wondered what that meant for his own family. "Does this make my son also my uncle?," he asked.

3. He loved comic books as a kid.

While Rudd did read Marvel Comics as a kid, he preferred Archie Comics and other funny stories. His English cousins would send him British comics, too, like Beano and Dandy, which he loved.

4. Rudd wanted to play Christian in Clueless. And Murray.

Clueless would have been a completely different movie if Rudd had been cast as the suave Christian instead of the cute older step-brother-turned-love-interest Josh. But before he was cast as Cher’s beau, he initially wanted the role of the “ringa ding kid” Christian.

"I thought Justin Walker’s character, Christian, was a really good part," Rudd told Entertainment Weekly in 2012. "It was a cool idea, something I’d never seen in a movie before—the cool gay kid. And then I asked to read for Donald Faison's part, because I thought he was kind of a funny hip-hop wannabe. I didn’t realize that the character was African-American.”

5. His role model is Paul Newman.

In a 2008 interview for Role Models, which he both co-wrote and starred in, Rudd was asked about his real-life role model. He answered Paul Newman, saying he admired the legendary actor because he gave a lot to the world before leaving it.

6. Before he was Ant-Man, he wanted to be Adam Ant.

In a 2011 interview with Grantland, Rudd talked about his teenage obsession with '80s English rocker Adam Ant. "Puberty hit me like a Mack truck, and my hair went from straight to curly overnight," Rudd explained. "But it was an easier pill to swallow because Adam Ant had curly hair. I used to ask my mom to try and shave my head on the sides to give me a receding hairline because Adam Ant had one. I didn’t know what a receding hairline was. I just thought he looked cool. She said, 'Absolutely not,' but I was used to that."

Ant wasn't the only musician Rudd tried to emulate. "[My mom] also shot me down when I asked if I could bleach just the top of my head like Howard Jones. Any other kid would’ve been like, 'F*** you, mom! I’m bleaching my hair.' I was too nice," he said.

7. Romeo + Juliet wasn’t Rudd's first go as a Shakespearean actor.

Yet another one of Rudd's iconic '90s roles was in Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet, but it was far from the actor's first brush with Shakespeare. Rudd spent three years studying Jacobean theater in Oxford, England, and starred in a production of Twelfth Night. He was described by his director, Sir Nicholas Hytner, as having “emotional and intellectual volatility.” Hytner’s praise was a big deal, considering he was the director of London's National Theatre from 2003 until 2015.

25 Inspiring Theodore Roosevelt Quotes

Photos.com/iStock via Getty Images
Photos.com/iStock via Getty Images

Born in New York City in 1858, Theodore Roosevelt grew up to become an influential politician and conservationist. He was also one of the most quotable figures in our nation’s history. The 26th president was known for his rousing speeches, informative books, and witty letters—most of which are still available for the public to appreciate today. Read on for some of the quotes that contributed to Theodore Roosevelt's reputation as a great writer and speaker—and make sure to subscribe to Mental Floss's new podcast, History Vs., which is all about TR, here.

1. On Hardship

“I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life, the life of toil and effort, of labor and strife; to preach that highest form of success which comes, not to the man who desires mere easy peace, but to the man who does not shrink from danger, from hardship, or from bitter toil, and who out of these wins the splendid ultimate triumph.”

—From the speech “The Strenuous Life,” given in 1899

2. On Power

“Power invariably means both responsibility and danger.”

—From his inaugural address given in 1905

3. On Conservation

“We have become great in a material sense because of the lavish use of our resources, and we have just reason to be proud of our growth. But the time has come to inquire seriously what will happen when our forests are gone, when the coal, the iron, the oil, and the gas are exhausted, when the soils shall have been still further impoverished and washed into the streams, polluting the rivers, denuding the fields, and obstructing navigation. These questions do not relate only to the next century or to the next generation. One distinguishing characteristic of really civilized men is foresight; we have to, as a nation, exercise foresight for this nation in the future; and if we do not exercise that foresight, dark will be the future!”

—From the speech “Conservation as a National Duty,” given in 1908

4. On His Life’s Motto

“I have always been fond of the West African proverb: ‘Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.’”

—From a letter written to Henry L. Sprague in 1900

5. On Woodrow Wilson

“Instead of speaking softly and carrying a big stick, President Wilson spoke bombastically and carried a dish rag.”

—From an address given in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1916

6. On Democracy

“Democracy to be successful, must mean self-knowledge, and above all, self-mastery.”

—From an address to the Union League Club in Chicago in 1911

7. On Progress

“I don’t for a moment believe that we can turn back the wheels of progress.”

—From his 1911 address to the Union League Club

8. On Yosemite

“There can be nothing in the world more beautiful than the Yosemite, the groves of the giant sequoias and redwoods, the Canyon of the Colorado, the Canyon of the Yellowstone, the Three Tetons; and our people should see to it that they are preserved for their children and their children’s children forever, with their majestic beauty all unmarred.”

—From Outdoor Pastimes of an American Hunter, 1905

9. On His Fighting Style

“Don't hit a man at all if you can avoid it, but if you have to hit him, knock him out.”

—From a speech given in Cleveland in 1916

10. On Success

“There are many qualities which we need in order to gain success, but the three above all—for the lack of which no brilliancy and no genius can atone—are Courage, Honesty and Common Sense.”

—From the pamphlet "The Key to Success in Life," 1916

11. On Perseverance

“Sometimes in life, both at school and afterwards, fortune will go against anyone, but if he just keeps pegging away and don’t lose his courage things always take a turn for the better in the end.”

—From a letter to his son Kermit Roosevelt written in 1904

12. On Life and Football

“In life as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Hit the line hard; don’t foul and don’t shirk, but hit the line hard.”

—From “The Strenuous Life

13. On Takeaways from George Washington's Career

“Washington's career shows that we need to keep our faces steadily toward the sun. You can change the simile, to keep our eyes to the stars, but remember that our feet have got to be on the ground.”

—From a 1911 speech at the Union League Club in Chicago

14. On Brains vs. Brawn

“Bodily vigor is good, and vigor of intellect is even better, but far above both is character.”

—From “The Strenuous Life

15. On Wilderness

“The farther one gets into the wilderness, the greater is the attraction of its lonely freedom.”

—From Outdoor Pastimes of an American Hunter

16. On What Makes a Great Democracy

“A great democracy has got to be progressive, or it will soon cease to be either great or a democracy.”

—From a speech given to the Colorado Legislature in 1910

17. On Passion

“Remember always that the man who does a thing so that it is worth doing is always a man who does his work for the work’s sake […] A scientific man, a writer, a historian, an artist, can only be a good man of science, a first-class artist, a first-class writer, if he does his work for the sake of doing it well.”

—From an address given at Columbia University in 1902

18. On Wisdom

“Nine-tenths of wisdom is being wise in time!”

—From a speech about military preparedness given in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1917

19. On Equality

“This country will not be a good place for any of us to live in if it is not a reasonably good place for all of us to live in.”

—From the speech "What a Progressive Is," given in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1912

20. On Failure

"Far better to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

—From “The Strenuous Life

21. On Criticizing the President

“To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public.”

—From an editorial written in 1918

22. On Being in the Arena

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."

—From the speech “Citizenship in a Republic," a.k.a. "The Man in the Arena” given in 1910

23. On Death

“Death is always and under all circumstances a tragedy, for if it is not, then it means that life itself has become one.”

—From a letter to Cecil Spring-Rice from 1900

24. On William McKinley’s Assassination

“It is a dreadful thing to come into the presidency in this way; but it would be far worse to be morbid about it. Here is the task, and I have got to do it to the best of my ability.”

—Likely from 1901, the year of McKinley's assassination

25. On Prejudice

“There are good men and bad men of all nationalities, creeds and colors; and if this world of ours is ever to become what we hope some day it may become, it must be by the general recognition that the man's heart and soul, the man's worth and actions, determine his standing.”

—From a letter written in 1903

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