Missouri Now Has a Retirement Home for Senior Shelter Dogs

Shep's Place Senior Dog Sanctuary
Shep's Place Senior Dog Sanctuary

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but you can give them a fresh start. As the AP reports, a new sanctuary in Independence, Missouri, rescues dogs from animal shelters and gives them a loving home where they can spend their “golden days in retirement,” according to the facility’s founder, Russell Clothier.

It’s called Shep's Place Senior Dog Sanctuary, and it serves older doggies in the Kansas City area that are effectively homeless, having lived in shelters for many years. Clothier said he came up with the idea while volunteering at shelters and noticing that the elderly dogs often got left behind.

“We believe senior dogs deserve to live out their lives in a safe, loving environment,” the sanctuary writes on its website. “Our facility and volunteers are dedicated to caring for these dogs, to give them the support and attention they have lost. We will try to find new families for them, but if we can’t, we will be their family and home, for as long as they live.”

The sanctuary is situated on four acres of land in a renovated old house. After spending much of their lives in kennels, the dogs who come to Shep’s Place get to run (or mosey) around, play in the yard, and sleep when and where they like. The sanctuary says it’s starting out with just a few dogs for now, but has plans to expand.

Check out some photos of the adorable residents below, and visit the sanctuary’s website to find out how to volunteer.

A brown dog
By George PR (BGPR)
Two dogs are handed a treat
By George PR
A dog scratching
By George PR
A one-eyed dog
Shep’s Place Senior Dog Sanctuary
A dog looking at the camera
Russell Clothier
A dog with birthday cupcakes
Russell Clothier

[h/t San Francisco Chronicle]

Is There An International Standard Governing Scientific Naming Conventions?

iStock/Grafissimo
iStock/Grafissimo

Jelle Zijlstra:

There are lots of different systems of scientific names with different conventions or rules governing them: chemicals, genes, stars, archeological cultures, and so on. But the one I'm familiar with is the naming system for animals.

The modern naming system for animals derives from the works of the 18th-century Swedish naturalist Carl von Linné (Latinized to Carolus Linnaeus). Linnaeus introduced the system of binominal nomenclature, where animals have names composed of two parts, like Homo sapiens. Linnaeus wrote in Latin and most his names were of Latin origin, although a few were derived from Greek, like Rhinoceros for rhinos, or from other languages, like Sus babyrussa for the babirusa (from Malay).

Other people also started using Linnaeus's system, and a system of rules was developed and eventually codified into what is now called the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). In this case, therefore, there is indeed an international standard governing naming conventions. However, it does not put very strict requirements on the derivation of names: they are merely required to be in the Latin alphabet.

In practice a lot of well-known scientific names are derived from Greek. This is especially true for genus names: Tyrannosaurus, Macropus (kangaroos), Drosophila (fruit flies), Caenorhabditis (nematode worms), Peromyscus (deermice), and so on. Species names are more likely to be derived from Latin (e.g., T. rex, C. elegans, P. maniculatus, but Drosophila melanogaster is Greek again).

One interesting pattern I've noticed in mammals is that even when Linnaeus named the first genus in a group by a Latin name, usually most later names for related genera use Greek roots instead. For example, Linnaeus gave the name Mus to mice, and that is still the genus name for the house mouse, but most related genera use compounds of the Greek-derived root -mys (from μῦς), which also means "mouse." Similarly, bats for Linnaeus were Vespertilio, but there are many more compounds of the Greek root -nycteris (νυκτερίς); pigs are Sus, but compounds usually use Greek -choerus (χοῖρος) or -hys/-hyus (ὗς); weasels are Mustela but compounds usually use -gale or -galea (γαλέη); horses are Equus but compounds use -hippus (ἵππος).

This post originally appeared on Quora. Click here to view.

A Rare Blue Lobster Ended Up in a Cape Cod Restaurant

Richard wood, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Richard wood, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Lobsters have precious few defenses when it comes to being tossed in a vat of boiling water or on a grill and turned into dinner. They have not yet evolved into not being delicious. But sometimes, one lucky lobster can defy the odds and escape their sentence by virtue of a genetic defect that turns them blue.

According to MassLive, one such lobster has been given a reprieve at Arnold's Lobster & Clam Bar in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Named "Baby Blue," the crustacean arrived at the restaurant from the Atlantic and was immediately singled out for its distinctive appearance.

Blue lobsters are a statistical abnormality. It's estimated only one in every two million carry the defect that creates an excessive amount of protein that results in the color. A lobsterman named Wayne Nickerson caught one in Cape Cod in 2016. He also reported catching one in 1990. Greg Ward of Rye, New Hampshire caught one near the New Hampshire and Maine border in 2017.

Lobsters can show up in a variety of colors, including orange, yellow, a mixture of orange and black, white, and even take on a two-toned appearance, with the colors split down the middle. Blue is the most common, relatively speaking. A white (albino) specimen happens in only one out of 100 million lobsters. The majority have shells with yellow, blue, and red layers and appear brown until cooked, at which point the proteins in the shell fall off to reveal the red coloring.

It's an unofficial tradition that blue lobsters aren't served up to curious customers. Instead, they're typically donated to local aquariums. Nathan Nickerson, owner Arnold's, said he plans on doing the same.

[h/t MassLive]

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