This Is America's Most Hated Chore, According to a New Survey

Pixabay
Pixabay

There's a reason why the word chore has become synonymous with all sorts of dreaded tasks. Few people enjoy doing the dishes or organizing that unruly stack of plastic containers in the cupboard, but some items on the typical household chore list are more universally loathed than others.

As Real Simple reports, a new survey of more than 1200 people was conducted on behalf of Clorox in an attempt to better understand people's cleaning preferences, and some of the results might surprise you. As it turns out, organizing and dusting bedrooms is the chore that's least likely to spark joy: Only 11 percent of respondents called it their preferred chore, making it the most hated clean-up duty (32 percent of respondents said they'd rather clean their kitchens).

As for the most "popular" chore—believe it or not, that dubious honor goes to the act of doing laundry. That's right, 37 percent of survey takers said they'd rather do the one chore that is never truly finished. (Perhaps some of these people own folding machines or folding boards to make the process a little more bearable.)

The survey also revealed other interesting findings about cleaning habits, like the fact that 31 percent of people said they never or rarely deep-clean their houses. Less surprisingly, 78 percent said they've concealed clutter in hidden spaces, like closets, while doing some last-minute tidying. Hey, we've all been there.

On the off chance that this survey has ignited your inner urge to get your home spick and span, check out these 15 tips for speeding up your spring cleaning.

[h/t Real Simple]

Can You Name the Answers to These 30 General Knowledge Questions?

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You Can Now Buy Your Own Harry Potter Invisibility Cloak 

Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001).
Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001).
Warner Bros.

Harry Potter fans, prepare to go nuts. Toy group Wow! Stuff has officially come out with an invisibility cloak and pre-orders begin on July 1.

According to CNET, the cloak works like a green screen and uses an app to show the wearer disappearing in photos and videos. The user can then save the photos and videos to their phone and show everyone their vanishing skills. The toy company felt compelled to warn users that they won't actually disappear, which is hilarious but worth clarifying in case someone thought they now had access to invisibility cloaks and real magic.

The creators actually examined the original cloak used on Daniel Radcliffe in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, now housed at Leavesden Studio, to make sure it was as close to the real one as possible.

The cloak, which is not transparent to the wearer, comes in two different versions: The standard cloak costs $70 and includes a stand to situate one’s phone for pictures. The deluxe version, which costs $80, has a serpent-themed border and a tabletop tripod so you can really go wild with photos.

The cloaks are set for an August 1 release, and have already made an impression on toy lovers, winning Innovative Toy of the Year at Sweden’s Toy Awards.

[h/t CNET]

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