6 Seinfeld Fan Theories That Will Blow Your Mind

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Few comedies have been subjected to as much scrutiny as Seinfeld, which premiered on NBC 30 years ago this year and featured a cast of bizarre characters orbiting the life of comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Each episode is a stream of intertwined plots, quotable dialogue, and world-building, from Kramer’s various side businesses to Elaine's unfortunate love life.

The audience’s enduring devotion has led to a number of theories about certain story threads. Check out some of the wildest alternative thinking about Jerry and the gang.

1. There’s a reason everyone is always catching up with one another.

Many, many episodes of Seinfeld are predicated on George, Kramer, and Elaine popping into Jerry's apartment to update everyone else on who they’re dating, how their job is working out, or why everyone needs to mind the Soup Nazi. These constant exposition dumps might be due to the idea that Jerry is constantly on tour doing stand-up and is out of town for weeks at a time. By the time he returns, the group has plenty of catching up to do.

2. Kramer is a widow.

Despite an endless stream of failed business ventures—Kramerica, sausage manufacturing, underwear modeling—Kramer never appears at a loss for money. He’s able to afford a New York City apartment without any apparent means of employment. User NwlinsTigers9 of the TigerDroppings.com forum posited that the reason Kramer appears unconcerned with his finances is because he’s a widow living off an inheritance. Having a deceased wife would explain why he attempts to emulate a domestic dynamic with Jerry, seemingly sharing in everything Jerry owns. Those nonsensical attempts to earn money are simply a way for Kramer to occupy his sad, lonely mind following the loss of his significant other.

3. George’s brother committed suicide. Because of George.

Few onscreen families appear to be as dysfunctional as the Costanzas, with George being continually browbeaten by his parents, Frank and Estelle. In 2016, Cracked writer Markos Hasiotis presented a possible motivation for why the family relations are so strained. In the season three episode “The Suicide,” George is reminded that his brother once got a woman named Pauline pregnant. George’s tendency to dwell on the lives of others may have prompted him to call this mystery sibling and remind him his life is in tatters, sending him into a depression that led to him offing himself. In the next episode, “The Fix-Up,” George is clearly dismayed. And in subsequent episodes, his parents’ hostility could be attributed to their resentment over George inciting his brother to make a premature exit. This would also explain the urn seen in the Costanza household, as well as the single table spot left empty when the family gathers to eat.

4. Kramer is a drug dealer.

Kramer’s lack of any obvious source of income will always be puzzling to viewers. According to Redditor IMTHEWIZZ, his lifestyle may be the result of illegal narcotics dealing. Drug usage would explain his frequently erratic behavior and his seemingly insatiable appetite, which sees him constantly bursting through the door to raid Jerry’s refrigerator.

5. The gang has the dynamics of grown-up Peanuts characters.

While not necessarily a plausible continuity theory, there is an argument that the four main Seinfeld characters could be inhabiting some of the dynamics of another group—the Peanuts gang of Charles Schulz comic strip fame. Redditor aehutton framed George as Charlie Brown, with his extreme neuroses and pessimism. Elaine is Lucy, taunting George. Jerry is Linus, clinging to childhood objects (cereal and Superman instead of a blanket). Kramer is alternately Pigpen or Snoopy, mellow and seemingly carefree. This also dovetails with a theory that Kramer is actually a dog prone to spastic movements and uninhibited emotions, and explains why he crashes into Jerry’s apartment with the enthusiasm of a canine.

6. TV’s Jerry is actually a bad comedian.

Jerry Seinfeld is a good comedian. He’s a student of the craft, has been practicing for decades, and sells out live shows to this day. While we extrapolate that to mean his sitcom counterpart was also a good comic, that may not be necessarily true. As one Redditor pointed out, viewers never actually see Jerry “kill” on stage. Distractions like hecklers ruin his concentration. In “The Abstinence,” he bombs in front of a junior high school class. In “The Ex-Girlfriend,” a woman breaks up with him specifically because she found his performance so unfunny. He’s also never shown hanging out with fellow comedians, save for the annoying Kenny Bania. In “The Finale,” even a captive audience of prisoners doesn’t seem amused by him.

Why the Crypts of Winterfell Might Be Most Dangerous Place to Be in Game of Thrones

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

The Crypts of Winterfell have been the center of attention in the first two episodes of Game of Thrones's final season, and it seems like the location is only going to play a bigger part in what's to come. In the upcoming battle against the army of the dead, anyone who can't or shouldn't fight, such as Gilly, her son, and even Tyrion Lannister, has been instructed to retreat to the crypts.

But considering this battle is supposed to be the biggest in the show's history, some fans aren't convinced that the crypts are as well protected as the series' characters seem to think—especially since so people have repeatedly made mention of how safe they are. (Foreshadowing much?) Besides being very close to the site of the battle happening right up above, the location leaves those hidden very vulnerable, as there seems to be only one way in and out of the maze-like corridors.

Many fans have speculated that the battle will be the perfect opportunity to resurrect a few fallen Starks, which could be who we saw Arya Stark running from in the season 8 preview. Beyond that, however, TIME argues that the Night King might be heading straight to Winterfell for one person in particular buried in the crypt.

Before the events of Thrones, there was a war between the White Walkers and humans that drove the undead north, while Stark ancestor Bran the Builder built the wall to keep them there. The publication speculates that cold came to Winterfell and the castle was constructed to contain a being called "the Great Other," who is the Lord of Light's opposite—the god of darkness, cold, and death. Some believe he was buried in or beneath the crypt, and that the oft-mentioned "there must always be a Stark in Winterfell" imperative was part of the magic needed to keep the Great Other in its place. Unleashing the Great Other would certainly be a game-changer in the highly anticipated battle.

Whatever is truly down there, we can likely expect many more creepy scenes from the crypt (if Arya's running scene is any indicator). And we're betting those seeking shelter below Winterfell won't be nearly as safe as everyone hopes.

Game of Thrones Opening Credits Might Confirm Fan Theory About Daenerys

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

When the highly anticipated final season of Game of Thrones premiered earlier this month, fans were pleasantly surprised at the new opening credits, which showed a more detailed map of Winterfell and King’s Landing. But fans know the series doesn't do anything without purpose and potentially hidden meaning, so surely there are lingering clues in the credits for us to interpret ... right?

According to Inverse, there could be a clue in the gold band of the astrolabe that spins around the Game of Thrones banner. The band now depicts moments from the past seven seasons of the show, with one of the images potentially foreshadowing something about Daenerys Targaryen. A fan theory floating around over the years has argued that Dany is really Azor Ahai, and the new season’s opening credits might just confirm that.

Azor Ahai, a.k.a. the Prince That Was Promised, was the leader in a battle long before the events of Thrones between the White Walkers, the first humans, and the Children of the Forest. Fast-forward to the present, and the White Walkers are once again the biggest threat to humans, so many fans have been hoping the prophecy that Azor Ahai will be reincarnated will ring true. Fans have placed their bets on Jon Snow becoming this long-awaited prince, considering that Melisandre hinted at it when she brought him back from the dead, and because it’s been revealed he’s the true heir to the Iron Throne.

In High Valyrian, the word prince could mean any gender, however. The prophecy says that Azor Ahai will “born amidst salt and smoke under a bleeding star.” Inverse points out the red comet pictured on the astrolabe in the season 8 opening credits is likely the same red comet Daenerys sees in season 2. The Dothraki call this the “bleeding star.” Inverse continues:

“In a way, Daenerys really was born ‘under a bleeding star.’ When she stepped into the flames at the end of season 1, she emerged a new person, the Mother of Dragons. The astrolabe seems to confirm this, too, showing Dany as a fourth dragon, which suggests she was spiritually reborn when her dragons hatched.”

Daenerys actually being Azor Ahai would mean two things are probable: She’ll be the one to defeat the Night King, and she might have to kill Jon—neither of which are entirely unbelievable. While we know the Mother of Dragons will be essential to the remaining episodes of Game of Thrones, we’ll have to wait and see exactly how.

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