Game of Thrones Fans Have Been Mispronouncing Khaleesi

HBO
HBO

While Game of Thrones fans are busy poring over every still image and official trailer released for the show's final season in the hope of noticing some tiny detail that might hint at what's to come, David Peterson—the linguist who creates the series' fictional languages—dropped a huge piece of information: we've all been mispronouncing  Khaleesi.

While being interviewed for The Allusionist podcast, Peterson described the rampant mispronunciation as "a real thorn in my side." So just how should we be saying the Dothraki word?

"I wanted to make sure if something was spelled differently, it was pronounced differently," Peterson explained of his process of transforming the handful of Dothraki words George R.R. Martin had created into a full language. "That worked pretty well for everything except the word Khaleesi ... There's no way it should be pronounced 'ka-LEE-see' based on the spelling. So I had to decide, 'Am I going to respell this thing because I know how people are going to pronounce this, or am I going to honor that spelling and pronounce it differently?' I made the latter decision and I think it was the wrong decision."

(That said, in his book Living Language Dothraki, Peterson writes that "many Dothraki words have multiple pronunciation variants, often depending on whether the speaker is native or non-native. Khaleesi, for example, has three separate pronunciations: khal-eh-si, khal-ee-si, and kal-ee-si," which at a later point in the book spelled is "ka-lee-si.")

Given that Daenerys Targaryen has a mouthful of other titles at her disposal, we'll just call her the Mother of Dragons from now on.

Game of Thrones returns for its final season on April 14, 2019.

[h/t: Digital Spy]

Game of Thrones's Episode 3 Teaser May Contain a Hidden Message from Daenerys to Jon

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Season 8, episode 2 of Game of Thrones, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," had its fair share of moments that could have given away hints for episodes to come, like in the writers' decision to include "Jenny's Song," or in Jon Snow telling Daenerys Targaryen that they're related.

One fan theory about the fate of Westeros, however, comes from the previews for next week's episode. Posted by Reddit user IgnorantSportsFan, the theory centers around one pivotal line uttered during a conversation between Daenerys and Jon: "The dead are already here."

"That line happens between Dany and Jon, and felt super significant—but we already see the army of the dead, felt it was too obvious to be their reaction to them," the theory begins."Then it clicked: The crypt is full of dead people. All episode they keep repeating and emphasizing how safe it was in the crypt, but its GOT and we cannot have nice things. So is it possible we have old Starks rising from the crypts? Or is that too far fetched?"

The theory certainly adds up, emphasized by the reminder that there were clips included of Arya Stark fighting in the crypts.

Could the dead be rising in the crypts of Winterfell as the White Walkers rapidly approach? We'll find out soon.

What the Song From Last Night's Game of Thrones Could Mean

Helen Sloan/HBO
Helen Sloan/HBO

Last night's episode of the final season of Game of Thrones, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," had a lot going on—from Brienne of Tarth becoming a knight to Arya and Gendry getting it on. However, one moment that stuck out for many fans was the song Pod sang as he, Brienne, Davos, Jaime, Tormund, and Tyrion sat around the fire. "Jenny's Song," may have been more than just a pretty tune: According to Vox, it may have foreshadowed the end of Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen.

The song comes from George R. R. Martin's books (though the show added some lyrics), and according to the theory, the lyrics are meaningful:

High in the halls of the kings who are gone
Jenny would dance with her ghosts.
The ones she had lost and the ones she had found.
And the ones who had loved her the most.
The ones who’d been gone for so very long
She couldn’t remember their names
They spun her around on the damp, cold stone
Spun away her sorrow and pain
And she never wanted to leave.

The song is about a woman, Jenny of Oldstones, and Duncan Targaryen, a prince who gave up the Iron Throne for love—and later died in a fire at a Targaryen castle called Summerhall. According to Vox, the song could parallel what might happen between Jon and Dany: One of them may give up their claim to the throne for love—but even then, there might not be a happy ending in store. (And based on Dany's reaction to finding out that Jon is her nephew—and the rightful heir to the Iron Throne—a happy ending does not seem likely.)

Most things that happen on Game of Thrones have meaning, so we'll be waiting to see if the song plays a significant role in the rest of the season.

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