New Stranger Things Comic Book Will Glow in the Dark

Kyle Lambert for Dark Horse Comics
Kyle Lambert for Dark Horse Comics

In case you’re keeping score, the Stranger Things franchise has given us two (and soon to be three) seasons of television, one prequel novel (and a second one coming this summer), a comic book series, and a ton of merch and board games.

Now, a glow-in-the-dark version of one of the previously released comic books will be debuting at Seattle’s Emerald City Comic Con, a four-day event that will kick off on March 14. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Dark Horse Comics will be selling copies of the first issue, featuring a glow-in-the-dark cover by illustrator Kyle Lambert, at the event. Lambert is known for his Stranger Things poster art, but he has also created posters for other popular franchises, including Jurassic Park, Jumanji, and Star Trek.

Unfortunately, these special edition comics will be sold exclusively at comic book conventions throughout 2019—which is all the more reason to snag a ticket and dress up like your favorite Hawkins, Indiana resident (bonus points if you can create a truly terrifying Demogorgon costume).

Dark Horse’s first Stranger Things comic series was released last year. Its four issues retold the events of the first season from the perspective of Will Byers, and a new prequel series will be launched this May. Titled Stranger Things: Six, the series will introduce readers to a new test subject named Six (a.k.a. Francine).

Separate from the comics, a prequel novel centering around Chief Jim Hopper, titled Darkness on the Edge of Town, is also scheduled to launch on June 4—one month before the show’s third season debut. In short, there’s a lot of Stranger Things content to look forward to, and it seems we won't escape the Upside Down anytime soon.

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

The Difference Between a Snap and a Blip in the Marvel Cinematic Universe 

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

Every Marvel fan remembers that traumatic moment in Avengers: Infinity War when Thanos finally gathered all of the Infinity Stones and, with a simple snap of his fingers, wiped out half of the universe's population. That climactic moment needed a name, which ended up being (appropriately, albeit simplistically) referred to as the Snap.

Then came Spider-Man: Far From Home, which referred to the deadly moment as the Blip, leaving fans confused. In order to head off any confusion, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige stepped in to clarify the distinct different between a Snap and a Blip in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In an interview with Fandango, Feige explained: 

"It came pretty fast. We always referred to it as the Blip, and then the public started referring to it as the Snap. We think it's funny when high school kids just call this horrific, universe-changing event the Blip. We've narrowed it down to—the Snap is when everybody disappeared at the end of Infinity War. The Blip is when everybody returned at the end of Endgame … and that is how we have narrowed in on the definitions." 

Spider-Man: Far From Home is the first MCU movie to come after Endgame, so it has the hefty task of showing what the world is like after the Blip, as people return after five years. The people who survived aged normally, but those in the Blip didn’t age at all. It’s a whole exciting world of complexity, but at least we know how to speak about it properly.

[h/t Fandango]

Here's Each State’s Favorite Comic Book Universe

drante, iStock / Getty Images Plus
drante, iStock / Getty Images Plus

The hype surrounding the Marvel Cinematic Universe had barely subsided into a low roar after the 2018 releases of Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War when 2019 brought us two more back-to-back MCU blockbusters: Captain Marvel and Avengers: Endgame. Between the films themselves and the ceaseless stream of fan theories, celebrity content, and toys, it seems like it’s Marvel’s world and we love nothing more than living in it.

But in a recent nationwide analysis by DISH sales agent USDish.com, it appears that a majority of America actually prefers the DC universe over Marvel's. The study used Google Trends data to find out which comic book universe—and which superhero—each state searched for most often. DC is most popular in a surprising 32 states, while Marvel is tops in a mere 14 state. Four states (Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Kentucky) were tied between the two. DC was also the winner when it came to most popular individual superheroes, though with a smaller margin: 29 states went with a DC hero, while 22 chose someone Marvelous. Superman, a DC creation, held the number one spot in eight states, the most of any superhero.

Illustrated map showing most popular comic book universe in each state
USDish.com

The outcome differs pretty significantly from last year’s study, in which Marvel reigned supreme in 37 states, and DC in only 8 (the remaining five were tied).

It seems, however, that states don’t have a loyalist mentality when it comes to comic book universes: Plenty of states’ most searched-for-superhero was not from its most searched-for universe. Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, for example, all chose DC and the Hulk, while Texas and Iowa chose Marvel and Superman.

In a couple of instances, the actor who plays the superhero possibly influenced the results. Captain Marvel, brought to life by California-born Brie Larson, was California’s most popular superhero, while Jason Momoa’s Aquaman came out on top in his home state of Hawaii.

Though the list of top superheroes by state is heavily occupied by uber-popular names like Thor, Batman, and Black Panther, it’s not without a few head-scratchers. Kansas and Michigan both apparently love Green Lantern, while Delaware’s top superhero was Batman’s sidekick Robin.

See the full list here to find out what your state thinks.

[h/t USDish.com]

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