Sweet Gig: Cadbury Is Hiring Chocolate Tasters

Matt Cardy, Getty Images
Matt Cardy, Getty Images

If you’re tired of waiting around for Cadbury Creme Eggs to reappear on store shelves in the lead-up to Easter, you might want to go directly to the source instead. As Insider reports, the maker of Cadbury, Milka, and Toblerone chocolate is looking to hire four part-time chocolate tasters.

The company, Mondelēz International, also produces Oreos and Chips Ahoy!, as well as non-chocolatey brands like Ritz, Sour Patch Kids, and Trident. In its job post, Mondelēz says it’s looking for someone with “a passion for confectionery and taste buds for detection” to sample new products and provide honest feedback. Applicants who make it past the initial review stage will be subjected to several “choco-challenges” to see if they can distinguish between confections with subtle differences.

While chocolate testers would certainly need to have a taste for sweet treats, the job isn’t demanding enough to spoil your appetite. Only about eight hours per week are required, making it an ideal side gig, college job, or opportunity for stay-at-home parents to get back into the workforce. The position is based 39 miles west of London, in Wokingham, England, but the post doesn’t say anything about citizenship requirements, so it’s presumably open to Americans, Canadians, and other English speakers.

New recruits to the 12-person team will be paid an hourly wage of about $14.30 (comparatively, the UK’s current minimum wage is about $10.40 for workers aged 25 and up). While it’s not going to make you rich, it’s a job many chocoholics would be willing to do for free. The company is expecting a high number of applicants, and explained that there's no use in following up if you haven't heard back within 14 days of applying.

Last year, the company advertised a similar role and received 6000 applications from around the world. If this sounds like a pretty sweet gig to you, you can apply on Mondelēz’s website. The deadline to apply is March 8, 2019.

[h/t Insider]

The Reason Why 'Doritos Breath' Stopped Being a Problem

iStock/FotografiaBasica
iStock/FotografiaBasica

In the 1960s, Frito-Lay marketing executive Arch West returned from a family vacation in California singing the praises of toasted tortillas he had sampled at a roadside stop. In 1972, his discovery morphed into Doritos, a plain, crispy tortilla chip that was sprinkled with powdered gold in the form of nacho cheese flavoring.

Doritos enthusiasts were soon identifiable by the bright orange cheese coating that covered their fingers. But there was another giveaway that they had been snacking: a garlic-laden, oppressive odor emanating from their mouths. The socially stigmatizing condition became known as "Doritos breath." And while the snack still packs a potent post-mastication smell, it’s not nearly as severe as it was in the 1970s and 1980s. So what happened?

Like most consumer product companies, Frito-Lay regularly solicits the opinions of focus groups on how to improve their products. The company spent more than a decade compiling requests, which eventually boiled down to two recurring issues: Doritos fans wanted a cheesier taste, and they also wanted their breath to stop wilting flowers.

The latter complaint was not considered a pressing issue. Despite their pungent nature, Doritos were a $1.3 billion brand in the early 1990s, so clearly people were willing to risk interpersonal relationships after inhaling a bag. But in the course of formulating a cheesier taste—which the company eventually dubbed Nacho Cheesier Doritos—they found that it altered the impact of the garlic powder used in making the chip. Infused with the savory taste known as umami, the garlic powder was what gave Doritos their lingering stink. Tinkering with the garlic flavoring had the unintended—but very happy—consequence of significantly reducing the smell.

“It was not an objective at all,” Stephen Liguori, then-vice president of marketing at Frito-Lay, told the Associated Press in April 1992. “It turned out to be a pleasant side effect of the new and improved seasoning.”

Frito-Lay offered snack-sized bags of the new flavor and enlisted former heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman to promote it. Ever since, complaints of the scent of Doritos wafting from the maws of co-workers have been significantly reduced, and the Nacho Cheesier variation has remained the Doritos flavor of choice among consumers.

When Arch West died in 2011 at the age of 97, his family decided to sprinkle Doritos in his grave. They were plain. Not because of the smell, but because his daughter, Jana Hacker, believed that mourners wouldn’t want nacho cheese powder on their fingers.

Recall Alert: King Arthur Flour Sold at Aldi and Walmart Recalled Due to E. Coli Concerns

iStock/KenWiedemann
iStock/KenWiedemann

A new item has been pulled from supermarket shelves in light of an E. coli outbreak, NBC 12 reports. This time, the product being recalled is King Arthur flour, a popular brand sold at Aldi, Walmart, Target, and other stores nationwide.

The voluntarily product recall, announced by King Arthur Flour, Inc. and the FDA on Thursday, June 13, affects roughly 114,000 bags of unbleached all-purpose flour. The flour is made from wheat from the ADM Milling Company, which has been linked to an ongoing E. coli outbreak in the U.S. Though none of the cases reported so far have been traced back to King Arthur flour, the product is being taken off the market as a precaution.

Five-pound bags of unbleached all-purpose flour from specific lot codes and use-by dates are the only King Arthur products impacted by the recall. If you find King Arthur flour in the grocery store or in your pantry at home, check for this dates and numbers below the nutrition facts to see if it's been recalled.

Best used by 12/07/19 Lot: L18A07C
Best used by 12/08/19 Lots: L18A08A, L18A08B
Best used by 12/14/19 Lots: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

E. coli contamination is always a risk with flour, which is why raw cookie dough is still unsafe to eat even if it doesn't contain eggs. The CDC warns that even allowing children to play or craft with raw dough isn't a smart idea.

[h/t NBC 12]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER