The Peppa Effect: U.S. Kids Who Watch Peppa Pig Are Developing Slight British Accents

20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment

Peppa Pig, an innocent cartoon about a little pig and her animal friends, has sparked a surprising amount of controversy around the world. The show was banned in China for promoting so-called "gangster attitudes," while one episode was pulled in Australia for teaching kids not to be afraid of spiders. Now the Evening Standard reports that listening to the characters all day is teaching kids in the U.S. to speak in a slight British accent—but instead of complaining, American parents are loving the cute side effect.

Peppa Pig is produced in the UK, and the main character speaks in a southern British accent and uses Britishisms. Enough young viewers have picked up on Peppa's way of speaking that the phenomenon has been dubbed the "Peppa Effect."

"Yeah I can vouch for the #PeppaEffect in our house," one parent wrote on Twitter. "Tayla absolutely lapses into a slight Brit accent and vocabulary, and uses the word 'straightaway' more than I ever have in my life! … 'Daddy, when we get home do I have to go to bed straightaway?'" Another Twitter user says their 7-year-old son now refers to taking a vacation as going "on holiday" thanks to Peppa Pig.

Any effect the show is having on their kids' language development doesn't seem to concern most parents. Adults who've witnessed the Peppa Effect have even gone so far as to thank Peppa Pig for giving their children the entertaining and adorable habit.

Though Peppa has British origins, her show has been broadcast internationally for years. Peppa Pig is watched in more than 200 countries and worth over $1 billion worldwide.

[h/t Evening Standard]

Peter Dinklage Can't Say Benevolent in This Game of Thrones Blooper Reel

Helen Sloan, HBO
Helen Sloan, HBO

There are many adjectives one might use to describe HBO's Game of Thrones. While hilarious isn't usually one of them (though the series certainly has its moments of levity), that's the best way to describe the Game of Thrones blooper reel below, in which some of your favorite throne-seekers momentarily break character—and Peter Dinklage has a problem pronouncing the word benevolent. (Warning: profanity ahead!)

Ralph Fiennes Almost Turned Down Voldemort Role in Harry Potter Movies

WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.
WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. HARRY POTTER PUBLISHING RIGHTS (C) J.K.R.

Ralph Fiennes has earned Oscar nominations for Schindler's List and The English Patient, but his best-known role might be his performance as He Who Must Not Be Named, otherwise known as Voldemort, in the Harry Potter film series. While the movies introduced Fiennes and his work to a new generation of moviegoers, he recently revealed that he almost said no to the project altogether.

We first saw Fiennes as Voldemort in the fourth film in the series, 2005's Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and he continued to play the Dark Lord of the Harry Potter universe until the series' conclusion in 2011.

Though fans would argue that it was the role Fiennes was born to play, saying "yes" was not an immediate decision for the celebrated actor.

"The truth is I was actually ignorant about the films and the books," the actor recently admitted while appearing on The Jonathan Ross Show when asked about his relationship to the Potterverse prior to taking on the role. "I was approached by the production. Mike Newell was directing the film that they wanted me to be in ... the first time Voldemort was going to appear physically."

"Out of ignorance I just sort of thought, this isn’t for me," Fiennes continued. "Quite stupidly I resisted, I was hesitant. I think the clincher was that my sister Martha—who has three children who were then probably about 12, 10, and 8—said, 'What do you mean? You’ve got to do it!' So then I rewound my thinking."

Potterheads everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to Fiennes's sister—and her kids.

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