Want to Get Back at Your Ex? Name a Cockroach After Them And Watch a Meerkat Eat It on Valentine's Day

iStock.com/THEGIFT777
iStock.com/THEGIFT777

Cockroaches have become the unofficial mascot of Valentine's Day at a handful of U.S. zoos. At the Bronx Zoo in New York, you can pay to name a Madagascar hissing cockroach after your beloved in celebration of the holiday ("give the gift that's eternal," they advertise). This year, the El Paso Zoo in Texas is offering a similar promotion, but with an unromantic twist: Ask them and they'll name a cockroach after your ex before feeding it to a meerkat on Valentine's Day, CBS News reports.

The El Paso Zoo writes on Facebook that their Quit Bugging Me event is "the perfect Valentine's Day gift." Message the zoo your ex's name on Facebook, and starting February 11, their first name and last initial will be displayed on social media and outside the meerkat exhibit.

On February 14, the unlucky bugs will be fed to the zoo's meerkats as part of their daily enrichment activities. Even if you don't feel compelled to get petty vengeance on an ex, you can still participate by watching a live stream of the event at 2:15 p.m. Mountain Time.

Zoos aren't the only places offering the public offbeat ways to celebrate Valentine's Day. The Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn gives free tours around the holiday, and White Castle accepts Valentine's reservations for full-service dinners.

[h/t CBS News]

Do You Know the Fun Terms for These Groups of Animals?

Massive Swarms of Migrating Dragonflies Are So Large They’re Popping Up on Weather Radar

emprised/iStock via Getty Images
emprised/iStock via Getty Images

What do Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Ohio all have in common? Epic swarms of dragonflies, among other things.

WSLS-TV reports that this week, weather radar registered what might first appear to be late summer rain showers. Instead, the green blotches turned out to be swarms of dragonflies—possibly green darners, a type of dragonfly that migrates south during the fall.

Norman Johnson, a professor of entomology at The Ohio State University, told CNN that although these swarms happen occasionally, they’re definitely not a regular occurrence. He thinks the dragonflies, which usually prefer to travel alone, may form packs based on certain weather conditions. If that sounds vague, it’s because it is: Johnson said that entomologists haven’t worked out all the details when it comes to dragonfly migration. They do know that the airborne insects cover an average of eight miles per day, while some overachievers can fly as far as 86.

Based on the radar footage shared by the National Weather Service’s Cleveland Office, the dragonfly clouds seem almost menacing. But, while swarms of any insect species aren’t exactly delightful, these creatures are both harmless and surprisingly beautiful, at least up close. Anna Barnett, a resident of Jeromesville, Ohio, even told CNN that witnessing the natural phenomenon was “amazing!”

Amazing as it may be to see, it’s hard to hear news about unpredictable animal behavior without wondering if it’s related in some way to Earth’s rising temperatures. After all, climate change has already affected wasps in Alabama, polar bears in Russia, and no doubt countless other animal species around the world.

[h/t WSLW-TV]

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