New Software is Looking to Crack Down on Netflix and Hulu Password Sharing

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iStock.com/wutwhanfoto

Not everyone who binge-watches Stranger Things is paying for the privilege. In 2017, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found that 21 percent of streaming service viewers aged 18 to 24 accessed a service like Netflix, Hulu, or HBO Go using someone else’s account and password.

Thanks to a combination of technology and an appetite for subscriber growth, you might be forced into a Netflix password reset.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, UK-based technology company Synamedia announced a software program that uses artificial intelligence to track account activity for streaming subscriptions. If login behavior is atypical—for example, an account sign-in at another home with substantially different tastes in content—the account can be flagged for review. The content provider would then have the choice of offering the user an account upgrade allowing for multiple users or disallowing the sharing activity.

Synamedia is banking on the idea that popular streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime might be interested in the technology, though past comments by executives have indicated the opposite—the companies find account sharing, even outside the household, to be an effective form of advertising.

“We love people sharing Netflix,” CEO Reed Hastings said in 2017. “That’s a positive thing, not a negative thing.”

What could change their tune? If new subscriber growth slows down. Industry analysts believe any significant drop in new account sign-ups could prompt investors to urge streaming companies to curtail sharing. That may become more of an issue as more of these content providers crop up, inching closer toward a monthly billing amount that users may compare unfavorably to expensive cable packages. If you pay for three services, you might be more tempted to borrow the password for the fourth.

Netflix has yet to comment on Synamedia’s efforts.

[h/t WTOC]

Watch Ford's Sweaty-Butt Robot Put a Car Seat to the Test

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iStock.com/gargantiopa

Buyers tend to look at price, safety, and gas mileage when shopping for a car; a question that rarely comes up at the dealership is how well a car seat stands up to years of butt sweat. But even if it isn't a priority for car owners, the vehicle testers at Ford work to ensure the cars that leave the factory can accommodate the sweatiest passengers.

The secret to Ford's durable seats is a device called the Robutt. This video from the car company shows a Kuka robotic arm pushing a buttocks-shaped cushion into a car seat. To replicate a person sitting in the car after exercising, the dummy butt is heated to approximately human body temperate and pumped with half a liter of water. The average person produces about 0.7 to 1.5 liters of sweat in one hour of intense exercise, and people who are especially fit perspire 1.5 to 1.8 liters in the same time.

The sit test is repeated 7500 times over three days—simulating one decade of someone driving their sweaty behind home from the gym. If the surface of a car seat can make it through all that abuse without any wear and tear, the design is good enough for a Ford vehicle. Robutt-approved seats were first introduced in the 2018 Ford Fiesta and are now being built into all Ford vehicles in Europe.

You can watch the messy process play out below. Here are some more robots that, like the Robutt, were designed for oddly specific tasks.

Your Netflix Subscription Just Shot Up in Price

iStock.com/amesy
iStock.com/amesy

For the past several years, Netflix has been rolling out a steady stream of expensive original content, from Dave Chappelle comedy specials (for which he was reportedly paid $20 million apiece) to $90 million feature film spectacles like 2018’s Bright.

It appears the bill now needs settling up. Variety reports that the service has announced a price hike for its 58.4 million subscribers.

Effective immediately, Netflix subscribers on the Standard plan with two HD streams will pay $12.99 monthly, up from $10.99; the Premium plan, which includes four HD streams and 4K options, is jumping from $13.99 to $15.99 per month; while the Basic plan, with one standard-definition stream, will increase by a dollar, from $7.99 to $8.99.

In a press release explaining the fee increase, Netflix stated that the price hike is partly a product of the company’s desire to “continue investing in great entertainment and improving the overall Netflix experience.”

Naturally, whether that represents value depends on whether users are enjoying their programming. Financially, the company spends more on content than comparable services like HBO and Hulu—by some estimates, as much as $13 billion in 2018.

Subscribers have a new season of The Punisher, Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened, a documentary on the doomed Fyre music festival; and a new Ted Bundy documentary series, Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes, to look forward to in the coming weeks.

[h/t Variety]

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