10 Strange Items the TSA Found in People's Luggage in 2018

iStock.com/AzmanL
iStock.com/AzmanL

Every year, the TSA screens about 700 million travelers across nearly 450 airports. That’s more than 2 million passengers each day. And while most people pass through security checkpoints without incident, a handful of travelers are stopped every day—sometimes for attempting to lug some truly bizarre items to their departing gate.

Thanks to the TSA’s Webby-winning Instagram account—made famous by the agency’s late social media guru Bob Burns, who passed away in October—officials have kept track of the wackier things airport security agents saw in 2018.

1. A Python in a Hard Drive

A traveler bound for Barbados apparently thought it was a good idea to reenact Snakes on a Plane when they socked this ball python into a nylon stocking, hiding it inside an external hard drive. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service swooped in to take the critter.

2. A Fake Bomb

It might resemble something Wile E. Coyote would have concocted—and it may be 100 percent fake—but it’s still not allowed through security at Chicago O’Hare International Airport. Anything that remotely resembles a weapon will cause intense security checks. (In this case, the security checkpoint was closed for 19 minutes, inconveniencing countless passengers.)

3. Firecrackers

Please excuse this brief announcement: Don’t carry firecrackers—or anything else that goes "boom"—in your hand luggage. Especially a brand that has the word “Killer” in it.

4. Wedding-Themed Hand Grenades

We’ll let the TSA's Instagram account explain why these are a bad idea: “When our officers spot a potential explosive on the monitor, they cannot just open the bag and take a looksee to find out if it’s real or not. A TSA explosives specialist or a police department bomb squad must respond before the bag is ever opened. This can lead to costly evacuations, delays, and missed flights. These types of items can also lead to hefty fines and arrest. Contact your preferred shipper about your options, because they can’t travel via commercial aircraft. So even though they aren’t real, they can cause a lot of headaches.”

5. Freddy Krueger’s Hand

There is no loophole around the TSA’s knife policy: You may not bring any knives in your carry-on. You especially can’t bring them if they’re affixed to your fingertips. As the TSA elaborates, “While worn out fedoras and tattered green and red sweaters are discouraged in the fashion world, they are permitted at TSA checkpoints.” (You may stow a knife in your checked luggage.)

6. Giant Scissors

Unlike knives, scissors are allowed in your carry-on luggage—as long as they are shorter than four inches from the fulcrum. These ceremonial ribbon-cutting scissors found at Nashville International Airport didn’t make the cut.

7. A Phony IED

This fake improvised explosive device caused six checkpoint lanes to close at Newark Liberty International Airport. The TSA later learned that “the man carrying the IED in his carry-on bag was traveling to Florida to participate in a training event focused on X-ray detection of explosive devices.” Thankfully, the agents already had their training.

8. Bullet-Shaped Whiskey Stones

It’s OK to transport a gun and ammunition on a flight as long as it’s properly stored in checked luggage. But placing it in your carry-on is a big no-no. In 2017, the TSA discovered nearly 4000 firearms at security checkpoints—most of them loaded—and that number is expected to rise when 2018’s numbers are finally tabulated. To say the least, the TSA is strict when it comes to anything that remotely resembles a weapon. That’s why these ammunition-shaped whiskey stones (usually used to chill a drink without watering it down) weren’t allowed.

9. An Inert Mortar Round

People try to bring inert weapons of war, like this mortar found at Evansville Regional Airport, through the security checkpoint more than you think. (Case in point: Somebody tried bringing rocket launchers through Hawaii’s Lihue Airport.) When security officials spot something like this, they have to bring in explosives experts to ensure the device is actually inert. Delays ensue. So just leave your faux bombs at home.

10. A Live Cat

There are proper ways to transport your pet to your destination. Haphazardly stuffing your furry friend into your checked luggage is not one of them. At Erie International Airport, a security screener discovered this kitty (named Slim) stowed in a Florida couple's checked baggage. Slim was turned over to the Humane Society of Northwestern Pennsylvania. The couple, meanwhile, was charged with animal cruelty.

To see our 2017 roundup of the TSA’s strangest finds, click here.

A Private Island With Ancient Ruins Just Hit the Market in Ireland

32cnamart, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0
32cnamart, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

You don't have to go someplace tropical to buy a luxurious, secluded island. High Island, or Ardoileán in Irish, is located two miles off the west coast of Ireland, and it's currently for sale for $1.4 million, CNN Travel reports.

Eighty acres and 206 feet above sea level, the island is filled with natural beauty. It's home to wild birds like gulls, petrels, and peregrine falcons as well as freshwater lakes. High Island also has a rich human history; around the 7th century, monks built a monastery there, and the ruins still stand today. Some experts think the first human residents arrived much earlier, with pollen evidence indicating the appearance of settlements around 3000 years ago.

The property, which is being sold by a private owner through Spencer Auctioneers, does come with a few caveats. The island's run-down cottage isn't equipped with electricity or running water. There is a 970-square-foot building with a septic tank next to the cottage, but it's owned by the state. The Irish government also owns the monastery ruins on the island, including the church, beehive huts, altar, and graves. Plus, to get to the island, the new buyer will need to take a boat or helicopter.

Even for someone interested in a fixer-upper, renovating High Island will be a challenge. Any renovations or new construction projects there must receive planning permission—but according to Spencer Auctioneers, the fact that the island already has a septic tank means that new buildings will likely get approved.

A $1.4 million price tag is cheap compared to some private islands that have hit the market recently. Last year, a Caribbean island and former James Bond filming location went up for sale for $85 million.

[h/t CNN Travel]

Indiana Just Got Its First National Park

Actor and singer Derek Hough kayaks through Indiana Dunes National Park (formerly National Lakeshore) in September 2017.
Actor and singer Derek Hough kayaks through Indiana Dunes National Park (formerly National Lakeshore) in September 2017.
Daniel Boczarski, Getty Images for National Park Foundation

We have good news for outdoor enthusiasts in Indiana: The state just got its first national park. As Condé Nast Traveler reports, the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore has long been a favorite vacation destination among swimmers and hikers in the region, but it's getting some extra attention now that it’s part of the National Park Service.

The name change (from National Lakeshore to National Park) was included in a 465-page joint resolution that President Donald Trump approved last week. Throughout history, many of America’s national parks have been created by presidential decree. Theodore Roosevelt famously created five national parks—including Crater Lake and Mesa Verde—and Woodrow Wilson oversaw the establishment of the National Park Service, the Grand Canyon, and Rocky Mountain National Park.

As for Indiana Dunes, it’s now the country’s 61st national park. Situated along the southern tip of Lake Michigan, just a short distance from Chicago, the park is a popular place to swim and surf in the summer or hike and snowshoe in the winter. As the name suggests, the area is best known for its sand dunes, but it’s also home to 15,000 acres of wetlands, woodlands, prairies, black oak savannas, and bogs.

The change in designation doesn’t mean the park will automatically receive more funding or better protections, but park officials are hoping it will encourage visitors to branch out beyond the picturesque sand dunes. “While the beach and sand dunes will always be our primary draw for the public, we want visitors to get a chance to experience more of this great national park,” Bruce Rowe, public information officer for the Indiana Dunes, told Outside magazine.

If you’re looking to check out Indiana Dunes—or any national park, for that matter—you may want to consider traveling between April 20 and April 28. These dates mark National Park Week, when a series of special events and programs are held at parks across the country (and entry is free).

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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