How to Tell If Your Dog's Panting is Abnormal

iStock/Nevena1987
iStock/Nevena1987

​It's not abnormal for dogs to pant. Whether it's because it's a hot day or they're nervous about something like thunder, there are various and totally normal reasons why our furry friends might breathe a little heavier on occasion. Which makes it difficult to tell when it's normal and when it's something to be concerned about. Here are some reasons why dogs pant and ways to know if the panting is serious, according to ​WebMD.

EXERCISE

If your dog is partaking in some heavy exercise, such as playing with you or another pet, it's normal for them to pant a bit. Dogs normally take between 10 and 30 breaths per minute (depending on the breed), so it's important to take notice just how hard they're really panting. If the panting goes on for longer than you'd expect, and often, it's a smart idea to get them checked out by your vet.

HEAT

If it's particularly hot outside and your dog is panting, it's best to get them water and bring them inside. Dogs do not sweat like humans, and obviously cannot communicate to us with words. Panting is their way of telling you: Let's go back inside. When heat levels are extremely high, it's best to err on the safe side and keep them indoors entirely. And never, ever leave your dog in a hot car—even if it's "just for a minute."

ANXIETY

Your pup's panting could also be the result of nervousness or stress. If you notice your dog excessively panting in the car, for example, it's nothing to get too worked up about. (It could very well be that simply being in the car makes them nervous.) Just make sure the area they're experiencing stress in is kept at a cool temperature, and that they have water nearby. If you know what situations can trigger anxiety in your dog—fireworks, for example—do your best to keep them away from these situations when at all possible.

ILLNESS

Though there are all sorts of normal reasons why your dog might be panting, it can sometimes be indicative of a bigger issue. If you notice your pet excessively panting for no apparent reason, they might be sick. The list of possibilities of what could be wrong is is long and ranges from anywhere to allergies and respiratory disorders to heart failure or ​Cushing's syndrome.

If at any time your dog's panting cannot be explained, or somehow seems "off" to you, definitely take them to the vet ASAP. You know your dog's behaviors best, so if something doesn't seem right, it's best to consult with an expert.

Rhode Island Approves Bill to Create an Animal Abuser Registry

iStock/Kerkez
iStock/Kerkez

In what could be a major step toward curbing animal cruelty, Rhode Island just passed a bill requiring convicted abusers to be placed on a statewide registry. The objective? To make sure they don’t adopt another animal.

According to KUTV, the bill was approved by the Rhode Island House of Representatives on Thursday and is awaiting Senate approval. Under the law, anyone convicted of abusing an animal would be required to pay a $125 fee and register with the database. The collection of names will be made available to animal shelters and adoption agencies, which will be required to check the registry before adopting out any pets. If the prospective owner’s name appears, they will not be permitted to adopt the animal.

Convicted abusers have five days to register, either from the time of their conviction if no jail time is mandated or from the time of their release. The prohibition on owning another animal lasts 15 years. If they're convicted a second time, they would be banned for life.

A number of communities across the country have enacted similar laws in recent years, including Hillsborough County in Florida, Cook County in Illinois, and New York City. The state of Louisiana was fielding a bill last week, but the proposal was ultimately pulled from committee consideration after a critical response from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). The group’s policy statement argues that registries are costly to maintain, not often utilized by adoption centers, and don’t address the potential for abusers to find animals in other ways. The group also asserts that registries may influence potential convictions, as defendants and their legal representation might plea to lesser charges to avoid being placed in the database. The ASPCA instead recommends court-mandated no-contact orders for convicted animal abusers.

[h/t KUTV]

This Inflatable Sloth Pool Float Is the Perfect Accessory for Lazy Summer Days

SwimWays
SwimWays

Summer is the perfect time to channel your inner sloth. Even if you don't plan on sleeping 15 to 20 hours a day, you can take inspiration from the animal's lifestyle and plan to move as little as possible. This supersized sloth pool float from SwimWays, spotted by Romper, will help you achieve that goal.

It's hard not to feel lazy when you're being hugged by a giant inflatable sloth. This floating pool chair is 50 inches long, 40 inches tall, and 36 inches wide, with two "arms" to support you as you lounge in the water.

One of the sloth's paws includes a built-in cup holder, so you don't have to expend any extra energy by getting up in order to stay hydrated. Unlike some pool floats, this accessory allows you to sit upright—which means you can drink, read, or talk to the people around you without straining your neck.

The sloth floatie is available for $35 on Amazon or Walmart. SwimWays also makes the same product in different animal designs, including a panda and a teddy bear. And if you're looking for a pool accessory that gives you even more room to spread out, this inflatable dachshund float may be just what you need.

People sitting in animal pool floats.
SwimWays

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