Massive Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Raw Turkey Just Days Before Thanksgiving

iStock.com/kajakiki
iStock.com/kajakiki

The U.S. has been in the midst of a salmonella outbreak for more than a year, with the bacteria contaminating everything from cereal to snack foods as well as raw poultry. Now health experts warn that your Thanksgiving dinner may put you at risk for infection. As ABC reports, salmonella has been traced back to a number of turkey products, and Consumer Reports is urging the USDA to name the compromised brands ahead of the holiday.

The drug-resistant strain of salmonella linked to the recent outbreak has been detected in samples taken from live turkeys, raw turkey products, and turkey pet food, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Since November 5, 2017, 164 people in 35 states have contracted the infection from a variety of products.

While many of the items linked to the salmonella outbreak have been pulled from shelves, the potentially contaminated turkey brands have yet to be identified. In a news release, Consumer Reports urged the USDA to release this information in time for consumers to do their Thanksgiving shopping.

"The USDA should immediately make public which turkey producers, suppliers, and brands are involved in this outbreak—especially with Thanksgiving right around the corner," Jean Halloran, director of food policy initiatives for Consumers Union (the policy department of Consumer Reports), said in a statement. "This information could save lives and help ensure consumers take the precautions needed to prevent anyone in their home from getting sick."

Even if specific brands aren't flagged before November 22, the CDC isn't telling consumers to skip the turkey altogether. Instead, home cooks are encouraged to practice the same safety precautions they normally would when preparing poultry. To avoid salmonella poisoning, start with a clean work area and utensils and wash your hands and counter thoroughly before and after preparing the bird. But skip washing the bird itself, as this can actually do more to spread around harmful pathogens.

Cook your turkey until the meatiest part reaches an internal temperature of 165°F. And if you're looking for a way to make sure the juiciest parts of the turkey cook through without drying out your white meat, consider cooking the parts separately.

[h/t ABC]

The Ohio State Fair Is Hosting a ‘Sensory Day’ for Individuals With Autism

Halfpoint/iStock via Getty Images
Halfpoint/iStock via Getty Images

The Ohio State Fair has been a local tradition since 1850, and this year, fair organizers are trying something different. On Wednesday, July 31, 2019, the Columbus, Ohio, fair will offer a sensory-friendly morning for people with autism or other conditions that make them vulnerable to sensory overload, WOWK reports.

State fairs are normally filled with flashing lights, screaming children, and loud music—all factors that could be overwhelming for some people on the autism spectrum. That means many kids and their families are forced to stay home and miss out on what would otherwise be a fun experience because of the potential for sensory overload.

This summer, extra-sensitive guests will have an opportunity to attend the fair in a safe, inclusive environment. The Ohio State Fair teamed up with OCALI (the Ohio Center for Autism and Low Incidence) to remove or reduce any potential sensory triggers. Rides will run without the regular loud music and flashing lights, and if riders ever feel overwhelmed, they can take a break in the fair's air-conditioned quiet room. There they'll find low-tech and mid-tech activities, like fidget devices, that they can use to wind down.

Another way families can help kids with autism feel more comfortable at the fair is by preparing them for the trip. OCALI has written up a document that caretakers can use to walk their children through the day ahead, with full-color photos to illustrate each attraction. Anyone can access it for free here [PDF].

This year's fair in Columbus will follow the example of several other fairs and amusement parks that have made their attractions more inclusive for autistic guests in recent years. The State Fair of Texas offered its first sensory-friendly morning in 2018, and Sesame Place in Pennsylvania recently became a certified autism center.

The 2019 Ohio State Fair opens on July 24 and will run through August 4.

[h/t WOWK]

What Is the Difference Between Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke

YuriS/iStock via Getty Images
YuriS/iStock via Getty Images

When temperatures begin to climb, many of us can find ourselves growing physically uncomfortable. Indoors or out, warm weather can make us lethargic, sweaty, and nostalgic for winter. There are differences, though, between heat exhaustion—a precursor to more serious symptoms—and heatstroke. So what are they? And how can you treat them?

Heat exhaustion happens when the body begins to overheat as a result of exposure to excessive temperatures or high humidity. (Humidity affects the body's ability to cool off, because sweat cannot evaporate as easily in humid weather.) Sufferers may sweat profusely, feel lightheaded or dizzy, and have a weak or rapid pulse. Skin may become cool and moist. Nausea and headache are also common. With heat exhaustion, it’s necessary to move to a cooler place and drink plenty of fluids, though medical attention is not often required.

If those steps aren't taken, though, heatstroke can set in. This is much more serious and involves the body reaching a dangerous core temperature of 104°F or higher. People experiencing heatstroke may appear disoriented or confused, with flushed skin and rapid breathing. They may also lose consciousness. While heat exhaustion can be treated and monitored at home until symptoms resolve, heatstroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention by a health professional. Until help arrives, heatstroke should be treated with cool cloths or a bath, but sufferers should not be given anything to drink.

Although young children and those over the age of 65 are most susceptible to heat-related health issues, anyone can find themselves having a reaction to warm temperatures. If you’re outside, it’s best to drink plenty of fluids, wear light-fitting clothing, and avoid being out in the afternoons when it’s warmest. Because sunburn can compromise the body’s ability to cool itself, wearing sunscreen is also a good idea.

While it’s not always possible to avoid hot or humid weather, monitoring your body for symptoms and returning to a cool space out of the sun when necessary is the best way to stay healthy. If you have older relatives who live alone, it’s also a good idea to check on them when temperatures rise to make sure they’re doing well.

[h/t WWMT]

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