Kalsarikänni, or Getting Drunk in Your Underwear, Is Finland's Version of Hygge

iStock/CatLane
iStock/CatLane

Hygge, the Danish term that loosely translates to "coziness," doesn't have an exact English equivalent, but that hasn't kept the concept from gaining an international following. It has even made it into the Oxford English Dictionary. Hygge has opened the world up to a whole universe of comforting concepts—often, but not always Scandinavian or Nordic in origin—that encompass the full breadth of amazing, underrated life experiences. Enter kalsarikänni, a Finnish term that we just learned about from The Guardian.

Kalsarikänni is the Finnish concept of taking off your pants and getting sloshed on your couch. The term roughly translates to "pantsdrunk" and means drinking at home, alone, in your underwear. Whereas terms like hygge or the Swedish lagom (meaning "just the right amount") imply a certain wholesomeness, kalsarikänni (here's how to pronounce it) celebrates an activity that is indulgent, selfish, and so, so satisfying.

Though the term involves staying home, you don't necessarily need to be totally alone to enjoy kalsarikänni. It can also be accomplished with a good friend, roommate, or partner. And while you can do it in your underwear, pajamas are also acceptable. It just has to be comfortable.

Take it from Miska Rantanen, whose new book, Pantsdrunk: Kalsarikanni: The Finnish Path to Relaxation, is all about the subject. (Its UK title is the more descriptive Pantsdrunk: The Finnish Art of Drinking at Home. Alone. In Your Underwear.) Here are the steps he suggests in The Guardian:

"Pack the fridge full of budget-brand artisanal beer, stock up on dips, crisps and chocolate—and make sure you have the latest psychological drama ready to watch on Netflix. When you get home, immediately strip off your outer layers of clothing (the basic rule: take off anything that's even mildly uncomfortable or formal). Dressing for pantsdrunk generally means undressing. Gradually you'll reach the most pleasurable moment of your striptease: the slow peeling off of your sweaty socks from your feet, a sensation that deserves its own Scandi expression. Now saunter to the kitchen and grab one of the cold beers from the fridge. Sink down on the sofa in your underwear and let out a deep sigh of relief."

Doesn't that sound wonderful? We know what we'll be doing tonight, that's for sure.

And yes, there is an emoji for it.

[h/t The Guardian]

Guess the 100-Year-Old Word or Phrase

From Farts to Floozy: These Are the Funniest Words in English, According to Science

iStock.com/jeangill
iStock.com/jeangill

Fart. Booty. Tinkle. Weiner. We know these words have the ability to make otherwise mature individuals laugh, but how? And why? Is it their connotations to puerile activities? Is it the sound they make? And if an underlying structure can be found to explain why people find them humorous, can we then objectively determine a word funnier than bunghole?

Chris Westbury, a professor of psychology at the University of Alberta, believes we can. With co-author Geoff Hollis, Westbury recently published a paper ("Wriggly, Squiffy, Lummox, and Boobs: What Makes Some Words Funny?") online in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. The two analyzed an existing list of 4997 funny words compiled by the University of Warwick and assessed by 800 survey participants, whittling down the collection to the 200 words the people found funniest. Westbury wanted to see how a word's phonology (sound), spelling, and meaning influenced whether people found it amusing, as well as the effectiveness of incongruity theory—the idea that the more a word subverts expectations, the funnier it gets.

In an email to Mental Floss, Westbury said that a good example of incongruity theory is this video of an orangutan being duped by a magic trick. While he's not responding to a word, clearly he's tickled by the subversion of his own expectations:

With incongruity theory in mind, Westbury was able to generate various equations that attempted to predict whether a person would find a single word amusing. He separated the words into categories—insults, sexual references, party terms, animals, names for body parts, and profanity. Among those examined: gobble, boogie, chum, oink, burp, and turd.

Upchuck topped one chart, followed by bubby and boff, the latter a slang expression for sexual intercourse. Another equation found that slobbering, puking, and fuzz were reliable sources of amusement. Words with the letters j, k, and y also scored highly, and the vowel sound /u/ appeared in 20 percent of words the University of Warwick study deemed funny, like pubes, nude, and boobs.

In the future, Westbury hopes to examine word pairs for their ability to amuse. The smart money is on fart potato to break the top five.

[h/t Live Science]

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