'Lynchian' and 'Kubrickian' Among the 100 Film Terms Just Added to the OED

Ernesto S. Ruscio, Getty Images
Ernesto S. Ruscio, Getty Images

​Cinema nerds, rejoice! The Oxford English Dictionary has just announced that more 100 film terms will be added to its collection of words, according to ​IndieWire.

That total might seem like a pretty exorbitant amount ... until you consider the various subgenres that exist today, such as the addition of mumblecore, or the adjectives we often use to describe a filmmaker's artistic techniques, i.e. Spielbergian, and various ratings not previously included, like XXX.

Many terms you might've simply assumed were already in the OED have been added, such as the classic scream queen, to describe an actress known for her roles in horror films, and Not in Kansas anymore, to communicate a state of unfamiliarity.

Our personal favorite additions have to be Lynchian and Kubrickian, honoring the ways David Lynch and Stanley Kubrick's works are most recognizable. The OED defines Lynchian as an adjective to describe works of film or television that are “characteristic, reminiscent, or imitative of the works of David Lynch.” It goes on to explain:

“Lynch is noted for juxtaposing surreal or sinister elements with mundane, everyday environments, and for using compelling visual images to emphasize a dreamlike quality of mystery or menace.”

You can check out the full list of updates in the OED here.

22 Weird Jobs From 100 Years Ago

Metal Floss via YouTube
Metal Floss via YouTube

Before everyone started working in tech, people actually had their choice of eclectic and strange vocations that put food on their old-timey tables. Discover what lamplighters, lectores, and knocker-uppers did back in the day as Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy runs down 22 Weird Old Jobs from 100 Years Ago.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here.

The Definition of Museum Could Be Changing

The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
The Louvre Museum in Paris, France.
roman_slavik/iStock via Getty Images

If you’ve always casually defined museum as “a place to see art or historical objects,” you’re not necessarily wrong. But the International Council of Museums (ICOM) has a more specific, official guideline that defines a museum as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates, and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study, and enjoyment.”

ICOM’s 40,000 members have been adhering to this definition for almost 50 years to represent more than 20,000 museums around the world. Now, The Art Newspaper reports, some members want to change it.

On July 22, the organization’s executive board convened in Paris and composed a new definition that Danish curator Jette Sandahl believes better suits the demands of “cultural democracy.” By this updated description, a museum must “acknowledg[e] and addres[s] the conflicts and challenges of the present,” “work in active partnership with and for diverse communities to collect, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit, and enhance understandings of the world,” and “contribute to human dignity and social justice, global equality, and planetary wellbeing.”

The proposal immediately elicited harsh reactions from a number of other members of the museum community, who felt the text was too ideological and vague. François Mairesse, a professor at the Université Sorbonne Nouvelle and the chair of the International Committee of Museology, even resigned from the revisory commission—led by Sandahl—earlier this summer when he realized the new definition wasn’t, by his standards, really a definition. “This is not a definition but a statement of fashionable values, much too complicated and partly aberrant,” he told The Art Newspaper. “It would be disastrous to impose only one type of museum.”

The current plan is for ICOM members to vote on the definition at the general assembly on September 7 in Kyoto, Japan, but 24 national branches and five museums’ international committees have petitioned to postpone the vote—they’d like some time to create their own definition for museum and present it as a counter-proposal.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

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