Uber Is Offering Voters Free Rides to the Polls on Election Day

iStock.com/YinYang
iStock.com/YinYang

Thanks to Uber, you have one less excuse for not voting this Election Day. On November 6, the ride-hailing service will waive the fare on trips made to your polling place, Thrillist reports.

Transportation problems ranks among the top 10 reasons registered voters gave for not voting in 2016. This year, whether you don't have a car of your own or just don't feel like spending the gas money, Uber will bring you where you need to go to cast your vote.

Uber will also do the work of looking up your polling location for you. When you open the app on Tuesday, November 6, you will automatically be shown a "Get to the Polls" button. From there, you can find your polling place based on your home address and book a free ride there.

Uber is also teaming up with the nonprofits #VoteTogether and Democracy Works in the weeks leading up to Election Day to encourage as many people to vote as possible. At the beginning of October, Uber began rolling out tools within the app to guide users through the voter registration process before their state's deadline. The company is also sharing information on how to register to vote with drivers and delivery partners as well as hosting registration drives at dozens of its employee resource centers.

If you aren't sure how to vote in your state, you can kick off the process by watching our video on the subject.

[h/t Thrillist]

Schindler's List Is Returning to Theaters for Its 25th Anniversary

Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures

Schindler's List was first released on December 15, 1993, and it's still regarded as one of the most important films about the Holocaust ever made. In honor of its 25-year anniversary, Steven Spielberg's classic is returning to theaters for a limited engagement beginning Friday, December 7, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The film follows Oskar Schindler (played by Liam Neeson), a member of the Nazi party who used his influence to covertly save the lives of more than 1000 Jews during World War II. Though the events of the film took place about 75 years ago, Spielberg emphasized in a recent interview that the story is still relevant—perhaps even more so today than when it premiered in the 1990s.

"I think this is maybe the most important time to re-release this film," the director said in a recent interview with Lester Holt on NBC Nightly News. Citing the spike in hate crimes targeting religious minorities since 2016, he said, "Hate's less parenthetical today, it's more a headline."

Spielberg thinks there's an important message he hopes today's audiences will take away from the film: "Individual hate is a terrible thing," he said. "But when collective hate organizes and gets industrialized, then genocide follows."

The 25th anniversary re-release of Schindler's List will be the same version viewers saw in 1993—only the sound has been remixed to accommodate new theater technology. The movie will be playing in the theaters from December 7 through the 13th.

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

George H.W. Bush's Service Dog, Sully, Will Fly to D.C. With the Former President's Casket

Streeter Lecka/Getty Images
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Former president George H.W. Bush died Friday, November 30, leaving behind five children, 17 grandchildren, and one loyal service dog. Sully H.W. Bush, the yellow lab who served as Bush's companion for the last several months of his life, will accompany his late owner's casket to Washington D.C., CNN reports.

George H.W. Bush brought Sully (named after the pilot who famously landed a damaged plane on the Hudson River) into his home following the death of his wife Barbara in April. Trained by America's VetDogs, a charity that connects service dogs to veterans with disabilities, Sully can respond to a list of commands, including answering the phone. On Sunday, December 2, George H.W. Bush spokesman Jim McGrath shared a photo on Twitter of the dog lying in front of the president's casket with the caption "Mission Complete."

In addition to serving as the 41st president from 1989 to 1993, George H.W. Bush was a World War II veteran, businessman, and congressman. He passed away at his home at age 94, following struggles with numerous health conditions, including a type of Parkinson's disease.

Sully will be accompanying his owner's casket when it makes its way to Washington, D.C., where the former president will lie in state under the Capitol Rotunda before he's brought to his final resting place at his presidential library in College Station, Texas. The service dog's next job will be helping military veterans in the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland.

[h/t CNN]

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