Volkswagen Is Killing Off the Beetle—Again

iStock
iStock

Say your last goodbye to Slug Bug. Volkswagen will no longer be making its famous Beetle cars, according to the BBC. Production will cease in July 2019.

The German car design has been around since the 1930s—when Hitler had a hand in its creation—and the basic look hasn’t changed all that much since then. In 1997, Volkswagen debuted the New Beetle, a sleeker, more modern update on the original insect-like design. The last of the classic Bugs were produced in 2003. In 2011, the company replaced the New Beetle with another design that tweaked the Bug’s look just a little more. Now, it seems even the updated Beetle is going away.

Over its decades-long run, the Beetle became one of the most recognizable cars on the road, thanks in part to Disney, hippies, and of course, Ted Bundy.

The death of the Beetle has been rumored for a while. A Volkswagen executive alluded to the car’s demise at the Geneva motor show in March 2018, but a company spokesperson later walked that statement back, saying there were no plans to kill off the car. Recently, there were also rumors that an electric Beetle could be coming, but that idea seems to be off the table for now. VW only sold 15,166 Beetles in the U.S. in 2017, The Washington Post reports.

Could the Beetle one day be revived? Maybe. In a press statement, the CEO of Volkswagen’s U.S. arm, Hinrich Woebcken, said he would “never say never” of the potential for a revival of the car down the road. So the company seems to be leaving the door open.

If you’re not ready to say goodbye to the VW Bug just yet, you’ve still got a few months to run out and buy the 2019 Beetle Final Edition, the last model that will be produced by the company. And yes, it comes in a convertible.

[h/t BBC]

Find Your Birthday Word With the Oxford English Dictionary's Birthday Word Generator

iStock/photoman
iStock/photoman

Language is always changing and new words are always being formed. That means there are a bunch of words that were born the same year you were. The Oxford English Dictionary has created the OED birthday word generator, where you can find a word that began around the same time you did.

Click on your birth year to see a word that was first documented that year, and then click through to see what that first citation was. Then explore a little and be surprised by words that are older than you expect (frenemy, 1953), and watch cultural changes emerge as words are born (radio star, 1924; megastar, 1969; air guitar, 1983).

Does your birthday word capture your era? Does it fit your personality? Perhaps birthday words could become the basis for a new kind of horoscope.

Want to Give a Retired Police or Military Dog a Forever Home? Mission K9 Rescue Can Help

Mission K9 Rescue
Mission K9 Rescue

Over the course of their careers, working dogs perform lifesaving duties while assisting members of the police force and military. These dogs receive a lot of appreciation while they're on the job, but as they enter retirement, they're often forgotten in animal shelters. An organization called Mission K9 Rescue is dedicated to placing these dogs in loving forever homes after they've served the United States.

"Our mission is to give K9 veterans—and other working dogs who have served our country—safe, peaceful, and loving homes upon retirement from service," K9 co-founder and president Kristen Maurer tells Mental Floss. "There are so many animal-loving patriots in America, and most don't realize that many of these brave, selfless dogs often remain overseas much longer than needed when they are no longer able to work. Some do not receive adequate care. We bring awareness of their plight to the public, and we work tirelessly to rescue, reunite, re-home, rehabilitate, and repair these dogs so they can live out the rest of their days in a safe and comfortable environment."

Many retired dogs are abandoned in kennels—both in the U.S. and abroad—but for some, the situation is even more severe. According to Mission K9 Rescue, working dogs are sometimes euthanized en masse when they can no longer do their jobs. The organization aims not only to remove these dogs from harm's way, but to find them forever families that are a perfect fit for them.

After rescuing dogs from both the U.S. and overseas, Mission K9 Rescue matches them with new owners. If the dog has a past handler who is interested in adopting them permanently, reuniting the pair is a priority. For all other cases, the organization goes through a rigorous process to find dogs a brand-new home.

Mission K9 also specializes in rehabilitating dogs who have suffered either mental trauma or physical injuries in their work. Just like humans, canines can develop PTSD from working in stressful, high-pressure situations. After they're rescued, animals are given as much time as they need to decompress and reintegrate into society before they're adopted. On top of the mental demands, being a working dog causes physical strain, and Mission K9 provides medical care to dogs with injuries and other issues.

Anyone can apply to adopt a retired working dog from Mission K9 Rescue. If you're interested in bringing one into your home, you can fill out the application on the group's website.

German shepherd in a bed at home.
Mission K9 Rescue

Two dogs in the backseat of a car.
Mission K9 Rescue

Dog and owner in front of home.
Mission K9 Rescue

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