11 Things to Look for the Next Time You Watch Caddyshack

Warner Home Video
Warner Home Video

Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. A former greenskeeper, now, about to become the Masters champion. It looks like a mirac ... It's in the hole! It's in the hole! It's in the hole! But was it actually in the hole? Here are a few things to look out for the next time you watch the Harold Ramis, Bill Murray, Chevy Chase, and Rodney Dangerfield golf classic, Caddyshack.

1. THE GOPHER KNOWS WHERE HE’S GOING.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

During the opening credits, the pesky gopher terrorizing Bushwood Country Club can be seen tunneling under the fairways and greens, ruining the golf course as he goes along. In one of the shots, the path the gopher takes is visible by darker grass before he even gets there.

The low-budget special effects can be chalked up to the fact that the gopher wasn’t added until after the movie wrapped. The producers suggested they increase the role of the gopher, turning it into the narrative through-line that tied the film's bits together, so the hastily thrown together puppet and pathways were included later.

2. NEBRASKA LOOKS GORGEOUS THIS TIME OF YEAR.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

The fictional Bushwood Country Club was actually Rolling Hills Country Club (now Grande Oaks) in Davie, Florida, and was inspired by the Indian Hill Country Club in the Chicago suburbs where Murray and his brothers were caddies growing up. But it’s supposed to take place in Nebraska in the actual movie.

The geographical conundrum gets more complicated as palm trees can be seen in the scene where Danny eats and jumps out of the window behind his house to head to work. Of course, Nebraska doesn’t have palm trees.

3. CARL SPACKLER AND LOU LOOMIS ARE BROTHERS.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

Loomis, the Caddyshack’s manager and the only character to utter the title of the movie, is played by Bill Murray’s brother, Brian Doyle-Murray, who is also one of the movie’s co-writers. Doyle-Murray and co-screenwriter Douglas Kenney (who co-wrote the film with director Harold Ramis) initially pitched the movie as “Animal House on a golf course.”

The character of Danny Noonan (Michael O'Keefe), who sets out to win the caddie tournament scholarship, was actually based on Doyle-Murray’s older brother Ed, who won a similar golf prize when they were young.

4. THE STORM ISN’T MUCH OF A STORM.

During the fateful (and hilarious “Rat Farts”) storm where Spackler caddies for Bishop Pickering, the wind and rain nearly blow the two characters over—but it’s a bit of movie trickery at work. You can see trees in the background standing perfectly still, giving away the wind machine effect causing the “storm."

5. THE JUDGE CHANGES TIES WITHOUT US KNOWING.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

Al Czervik (Rodney Dangerfield) is quite the stylish golfer. Judge Smails (Ted Knight) is not. Maybe that’s why when Czervik gets into an argument with Smails in the clubhouse causing the judge to try to choke him, Smails is wearing one tie.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

But when they move to the judge’s office with Ty Webb (Chevy Chase) and Czervik challenges him to a golf bet, the judge is wearing a completely different tie.

6. CARL HUNTS GOPHERS ALL DAY AND NIGHT.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

During the nighttime party scene at the club, where Czervik makes fun of the judge, Spackler is outside with his gun hunting the gopher. As he moves from tree to tree, you can see that these scenes were shot during the day—even though Spackler is trying to corner the gopher at night.

7. THE INFAMOUS POOL SCENE WOULDN’T HAPPEN IN REAL LIFE.

When some pranksters at Bushwood drop a Baby Ruth candy bar into the pool—a scene that was culled from the Murray kids' real-life high school exploits—it causes some mistaken fecal-related mayhem for the unfortunate swimmers.

The candy floats around on the top of the water, only to make Spackler drain the pool and take a bite for himself. But even though the Murray brothers grafted their own hijinks onto the screen, it wouldn’t happen exactly how it did in the movie. Baby Ruth bars don’t float.

8. AL CZERVIK IS AN UNORTHODOX BOATER.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

When Czervik is buzzing around on his boat and ruins Judge Smails’ own boat launch before almost running over someone in a row boat, the footage is splashing toward the bow of the boat instead of away, meaning the footage is being played in reverse for some reason.

9. THE CADDIES SWAP SHIRTS.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

Czervik’s wake isn’t the only puzzling reverse seen in Caddyshack. During the big golf bet game, employees, club members, and other caddies are seen sneaking in between trees to spot the action. The logos on their t-shirts are in reverse.

It’s possible Ramis—in his first directorial gig—shot the actors sneaking one way, and realized it didn’t match up with the continuity of the direction of the golf game and simply flipped the film to make it seem like everyone was going in the same direction.

10. ONE CADDIE DOESN’T LIKE THE CAMERA VERY MUCH.

A screen shot from 'Caddyshack' (1980)
Warner Home Video

During the scene where Smails, Czervik, and Webb sit at the snack hut and make the $80,000 bet, Motormouth, the caddie in the green and white striped shirt, flips the bird to the camera. He can also be seen giving the NSFW gesture while holding the pin flag on the 18th hole while Danny makes his fateful putt.

11. THE ENDING BREAKS ALL THE RULES OF BETTING.

During the end scene, when Dr. Beeper and Judge Smails are on the final hole of the match against Ty Webb and Danny Noonan, the game is all squared up and all the young caddie needs to do is sink his putt to tie the match. But Czervik offers Smails a double-or-nothing bet. Even though the judge accepts those terms, he shouldn’t have taken that bet: He technically stood to make $40,000 or simply walk away with no money out of his pocket. Instead he risks $80,000 to potentially make another $40,000 on a game he didn’t lose.

You Can Get Paid $1000 to Watch All 20 Marvel Movies Before Avengers: Endgame Hits Theaters

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

Marvel fans in need of a little cash, listen up: CableTV.com, an online resource for finding the best TV, internet, and phone services, has posted a listing for what they've deemed "The Marvel Movie Marathon Dream Job." Just ahead of Avengers: Endgame's arrival in theaters on April 26, the company is looking for an individual to watch all 20 released Marvel Cinematic Universe movies back to back.

“Do you have the endurance of Iron Man?," the listing reads. "The tenacity of Captain America? The leisure time of Ant-Man? Then CableTV.com has a mission for you." The best part? The chosen individual will get paid $1000 for their time and will receive a bundle of MCU merchandise as well.

You may be asking: Why would a company want to pay someone to binge-watch a handful of movies they're probably already planning to watch on their own? Well, they’re also requesting that the selected viewer live-tweet their experience in collaboration with CableTV.com, then meet up after the MCU marathon and “share your takeaways from the movies so we can make some beautiful, badass rankings together.”

The competition is bound to be fierce for this job, and the application period will end on April 15, 2019—so don't delay in submitting yours here.

11 Surprising Facts About George R.R. Martin

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

Game of Thrones fans know the epic HBO series is based on George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire book series, but beyond the TV show, how much do they really know about the author? Sure, they know it’s taking him a really long time to finish The Winds of Winter, the sixth book in the series, but what about him as a person? Here are a few things you might not know about the man who brought us the world of Westeros.

1. As a kid, he made money selling monster stories.

The famed author grew up in Bayonne, New Jersey, where his father was a longshoreman. "When I was living in Bayonne, I desperately wanted to get away," Martin told The Independent. "Not because Bayonne was a bad place, mind you. Bayonne was a very nice place in some ways. But we were poor. We had no money. We never went anywhere."

Though his family didn't have the means to travel outside of Bayonne, Martin began to develop a love of reading and writing at a very young age, which allowed him to imagine fantastical worlds beyond his New Jersey hometown. He also learned that writing could be a profitable endeavor: he began selling his stories to other kids in the neighborhood for a penny apiece. (He later raised his prices to a nickel.) Martin's entrepreneurial efforts came to an end when his stories began giving one of his kid customers nightmares, which eventually got back to Martin's mom.

2. He is obsessed with comic books.

In 2014, Martin sat down for a Q&A about his career at the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival. Though, given his love of fantasy worlds, it might not be surprising to learn that Martin is a comic book fan, he also credits the genre with inspiring him to begin writing in the first place.

"I’m so grateful for comic books because they were really the thing that made me a reader, which in return made me a writer," Martin said. "In the 1950s in America, we had these books that taught you to read, and they were all about Dick and Jane, who were the most boring family you ever wanted to meet ... I didn’t know anyone who lived like that, and it just seemed like a horrible thing. But Batman and Superman, they had a much more interesting life. Gotham City was much more interesting than wherever it was where Dick and Jane lived.”

3. He built a library tower in Santa Fe.

In 2009, Martin bought the home across the street from his house in Santa Fe, New Mexico and turned it into an office space with a library tower built inside. The tower is only two stories tall, because of city building restrictions, but it seems only fitting that the author/history buff would want to be surrounded with books while he writes.

4. A fan letter got his professional writing career started.

Martin's love of comic books is what got his professional career rolling, too. "I had a letter published in Fantastic Four, and because my address was in there I started getting these fanzines and I started writing stories for them," Martin said during the same Santa Fe Q&A. "Funny enough, people writing stories in these fanzines at the time were just awful. They were just really bad, which was good because I looked at these awful stories and knew I could do better than that. I may not have been Shakespeare or J.R.R. Tolkien, but I was certain I could write better than the crap in the fanzines, and indeed I could."

5. A failed novel led to a television writing career.

More than 10 years before A Song of Ice and Fire debuted in 1996, Martin wrote a book called The Armageddon Rag in 1983. Though it was a critical disappointment, producer Phil DeGuere was interested in adapting the project with Martin's help. While that never came to fruition, DeGuere thought of Martin when they were rebooting The Twilight Zone in the mid-1980s and brought him on board to write a handful of episodes. He later did some writing for the live-action Beauty and the Beast series, starring Ron Perlman and Linda Hamilton.

6. Network television standards were not a fit for Martin's style of writing.

Though Martin found success as a television writer, the constant back-and-forth about what they were or were not allowed to show proved to be too much for the writer. "[T]here were constant limitations. It wore me down," Martin told Rolling Stone. "There were battles over censorship, how sexual things could be, whether a scene was too 'politically charged,' how violent things could be. Don’t want to disturb anyone. We got into that fight on Beauty and the Beast. The Beast killed people. That was the point of the character. He was a beast. But CBS didn’t want blood, or for the beast to kill people ... The character had to remain likable."

7. He owns an independent movie theater.

In 2006, The Jean Cocteau Cinema in Santa Fe closed its doors, which saddened many locals who were regular patrons, Martin among them. Several years later, Martin decided to give the theater a second life and, after a slight makeover, reopened its doors in 2013. Today, in addition to independent films, the theater holds regular special events—including screenings of Game of Thrones episodes. There's also an onsite bar that serves Game of Thrones-themed cocktails, like the signature White Walker.

8. Martin credits HBO with changing the rules of television.

Network television standards may have been too tame and regimented for Martin's tastes, but all that changed with HBO and The Sopranos, which he credits as paving the way for a series like Game of Thrones to exist in its current form at all.

"I credit HBO with smashing the damn trope that everybody had to be likable on television," Martin told Rolling Stone. "The Sopranos turned it around. When you meet Tony Soprano, he’s in the psychiatrist office, he’s talking about the ducks, his depression and that stuff, and you like this guy. Then he gets in his car and he’s driving away and he sees someone who owes him money, and he jumps out and he starts stomping him. Now how likable was he? Well you didn’t care, because they already had you. A character like Walter White on Breaking Bad could never have existed before HBO."

9. Martin thinks it's important for writers to break the rules.

While he's an admitted fan of William Goldman, Martin has a very different opinion of noted screenplay expert Syd Field. "There is a book out there by Syd and it’s his guide to writing screenplays and it’s probably one of the most harmful things that has ever been done for the movie industry,” Martin said. “For some perverse reason, it has become the bible not for writers but for what we call 'the suits,' the guys at the studios whose job it is to develop properties and give notes to supervise screenplays. They take Syd Field’s course and they buy the book and they start criticizing screenplays like, ‘Well you know, the first turn is supposed to be on page 12 and yours is not until page 17, so obviously this won’t do!'"

"Syd just writes downs these ridiculous rules," Martin continued. "If there really was a formula as he says, then every movie would be a blockbuster. We would just connect A, B, and C and we would have a great movie and everyone would pack the theater to see it. But every movie is not a blockbuster. Many movies that follow his rules precisely actually go down the toilet."

10. He’s a skilled chess player.

"I started playing chess when I was quite young, in grade school," Martin told The Independent. "I played it through high school. In college, I founded the chess club. I was captain of the chess team." Eventually, Martin discovered that he could actually make some money off this skill.

"For two or three years, I had a pretty good situation. Most writers who have to have a day job work five days a week and then they have the weekend off to write. These chess tournaments were all on the weekend so I had to work on Saturday and Sunday, but then I had five days off to write. The chess generated enough money for me to pay my bills."

11. He has a very specific way of writing, which is why he hasn't finished the winds of winter.

Fans have been waiting for a while for the next book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, and Martin has been honest about why it's taking him so long. "Writer’s block isn’t to blame here, it’s distraction," he said. "In recent years, all of the work I’ve been doing creates problems because it creates distraction. Because the books and the show are so popular I have interviews to do constantly. I have travel plans constantly. It’s like suddenly I get invited to travel to South Africa or Dubai, and who’s passing up a free trip to Dubai? I don’t write when I travel. I don’t write in hotel rooms. I don’t write on airplanes. I really have to be in my own house undisturbed to write. Through most of my life no body did bother me, but now everyone bothers me every day."

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