You Can Now View Leonardo da Vinci's Notebooks Online

Hulton Archive, Getty Images
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

Most people know Leonardo da Vinci from his paintings, but the artist also had the mind of an engineer, as evidenced by the hundreds of pages he used to sketch out his inventions. Now, two of the notebooks he left behind are being made available for the public to view. As The Art Newspaper reports, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London has published a digitized version of Codex Forster I online.

Codex Forster I—named for John Forster, who donated the book to the museum in 1876—is a bound volume consisting of two of Leonardo's personal notebooks. Dated from 1487 to 1505, it contains both the earliest and the most recent Leonardo da Vinci notebooks in the V&A's collection.

The contents feature some of the artist's inventions related to hydraulic engineering, including devices for digging canals and adjusting water levels, as well as his thoughts on measuring solids. The text is written in "mirror-writing"—which means all the letters and words are backwards and can only be deciphered when held up to a mirror. Because he was left-handed, this method of writing allowed Leonardo to write quickly without smudging the ink.

On the Victoria and Albert Museum's website, visitors can now take their time browsing and zooming in on the pages of Codex Forster I. Uploading the notebooks made them accessible to a global audience, but that's not the only reason they were digitized: Having an online version means the museum can focus on preserving the physical copy for centuries to come, instead of handing it off to researchers and shortening its lifespan.

The two other Leonardo notebook volumes in the V&A's collection, Codex Forster II and III, haven't received the web treatment yet, but the museum plans to make them fully viewable online sometime in 2019.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

10 Amazing Pieces of Peeps Art

“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council
“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Some people paint, some scrapbook, and others create Game of Thrones-inspired dragon sculptures made of 5000 marshmallow Peeps. Candy art may seem like an unusual form of craftsmanship, but it’s more common than you might expect in the lead-up to Easter, when organizations around the country host Peeps art contests.

The aforementioned dragon, as well as the artworks pictured below, were all submitted to the “PEEPshow” contest—a fundraiser for the Carroll County Arts Council in Westminster, Maryland. According to event organizers, the event became the first exhibition of Peeps art when it debuted 12 years ago.

Keep scrolling to see some of the best Peeps sculptures from recent years (2017-2019), and visit the Art Council’s website to see all of this year's participants. (As of Friday afternoon, a Warhol-inspired artwork of "Marilyn Peeproe" appears to be in the lead.)

A space-themed Peeps display
“First Peeps in Space” by International Delight / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A samurai sculpture
"Sugar Samurai" by Tristar Martial Arts / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

The rabbit from Alice in Wonderland
“I’m Late, I’m Late (for the PEEPshow)” by Vivian Davis / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A caterpillar sculpture
“The Very Hungry Caterpeeper” by Lia Finch and M / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A sculpture inspired by a painting
“Peep with the Pearl Earring” by Sandy Oxx / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council


“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A Belle sculpture
“Beauty and the Peep” by Candace Birger, Westminster Cake Studio / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Fish sculpture
“The Rainbow Fish” by Jen, Justin, Connor, and Jacob Myers / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A Gumby sculpture
“Just Gumby” by Sydney Blacksten / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A sculpture of a monster
“Percy the Purple Peeple Eater” by the Koontz Family / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Artist Turns 5000 Marshmallow Peeps Into a Game of Thrones Dragon

PEEPS® and Vivian Davis
PEEPS® and Vivian Davis

Game of Thrones returns to HBO for its eighth and final season on Sunday, April 14. Instead of worrying about which of Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons (if any) will survive to see the end of the series, distract yourself with some playful Peeps art inspired by the creatures.

In 2018, artist Vivian Davis (who's on Instagram as @tutoringart) constructed a Game of Thrones-themed dragon sculpture out of 5000 marshmallow Peeps as part of PEEPshow, an annual Peeps-themed event in Westminster, Maryland. The dragon has her wings outstretched, with a nest of colorful eggs in front of her. It's not quite life-sized, but it is massive—the candy model measures 8.5 feet tall, with a 7-foot wingspan. For comparison, Gwendoline Christie, who plays Brienne of Tarth, is 6 feet, 3 inches (or 75 Peeps chicks) tall.

A 'Game of Thrones' dragon made of PEEPS chicks with its wings spread
PEEPS® and Vivian Davis

Easter falls on Sunday, April 21 this year (also the premiere date of Game of Thrones season 8, episode 2) which means that Peeps season is in full swing. For more delicious Peeps content, check out these facts about the cute candy.

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