The Perseid Meteor Shower Is Going to Be Amazing This Weekend

Bill Ingalls, NASA/Getty Images
Bill Ingalls, NASA/Getty Images

If you have camping plans this weekend, you’re in luck. The annual Perseid meteor shower will be returning August 10–13, and it’s expected to be the best and brightest one in years, astrophysicist Ethan Siegel writes for Forbes.

The Perseid meteor shower—named after the Perseus constellation, where the meteors originate—occurs every August when the Earth passes through a path of debris left by the Swift-Tuttle comet. This comet orbits the Sun once every 133 years, and in doing so, the intense heat and tidal forces cause parts of the comet to break off, creating a floating field of debris. The dust and particles left behind compose a comet's two tails: the ion tail and the dust tail.

According to Siegel, a few factors determine how spectacular a meteor shower will be, including light pollution conditions, how close Earth gets to the center of the debris stream, the relative speed of the debris to Earth, and the stream's density. Plus, the new moon phase on August 11 guarantees a darker sky. For this reason, Saturday night should be the best time to head outside and look up.

"The Moon is very favorable for the Perseids this year, and that'll make the Perseids probably the best shower of 2018 for people who want to go out and view it,” NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke tells Space.com.

You’ll probably be able to see 60 to 70 meteors per hour at its peak. The most important consideration is to head somewhere with dark skies and little light pollution. For guidance, you can check out this online map of artificial sky brightness. Once you arrive at your preferred viewing spot, wait for the sky to get completely dark—about 2 to 3 hours after sunset.

Swift-Tuttle, the same comet that gives us these dazzling meteor displays, might also collide with Earth and wipe out life as we know it—but not for another 2460 years, at the very least. So until then, sit back and enjoy the cosmic show.

[h/t Forbes]

New British Coin Featuring a Black Hole Honors Stephen Hawking

The Royal Mint
The Royal Mint

It has been one year since Stephen Hawking’s death, but the theoretical physicist’s life and legacy live on in both time and space. In an effort to immortalize the late scientist, Hawking’s words were beamed toward the nearest black hole last June, and now, he has his very own coin in the UK.

As New Scientist reports, The Royal Mint has created a 50-pence coin featuring a drawing representing a black hole, Stephen Hawking’s name, and an equation he co-created with Jacob Bekenstein to describe the entropy of a black hole. Though Hawking wasn't the first scientist to predict the existence of black holes, he devised mathematical theorems (like the one on the coin) that lent credence to their existence in the universe. He was also the first person to discover that black holes weren’t entirely black because they emit radiation, and are therefore capable of evaporating and disappearing.

Edwina Ellis, who designed the collector's coin, said she was inspired by a lecture Hawking gave in Chile in 2008. “Hawking, at his playful best, invites the audience to contemplate peering into a black hole before diving in,” Ellis said in a statement. “I wanted to fit a big black hole on the tiny coin and wish he was still here chortling at the thought.”

A different Stephen Hawking coin
The Royal Mint

The Royal Mint says the Hawking coin is the first in a new series that celebrates British innovation in science. The coins come in gold proof, silver proof, silver proof piedfort, and “brilliant uncirculated,” and they’re being sold on The Royal Mint’s website (although most are currently sold out). In recent years, UK coins have also commemorated Sir Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin.

[h/t New Scientist]

First Person on Mars Will Likely be a Woman, Says NASA Boss

NASA astronaut Nicole Aunapu Mann at an event in August 2018
NASA astronaut Nicole Aunapu Mann at an event in August 2018
Bill Ingalls, NASA via Getty Images

In what is sure to be one giant leap for humankind, the head of NASA has announced that the first astronaut to set foot on Mars is “likely to be” female. As CNN reports, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine made the comment while appearing as a guest on a recent episode of Science Friday, a science and technology radio show.

At one point in the conversation, Bridenstine fielded a question from Grab Your Wallet Alliance co-founder Shannon Coulter, who asked in a tweet whether a woman would be involved in the next Moon landing, which could occur in 2028, if NASA gets its wish.

“The answer is absolutely,” Bridenstine answered. “In fact, it’s likely to be a woman—the first next person on the Moon. It’s also true that the first person on Mars is likely to be a woman.”

It is too early to tell which female astronauts might be eligible for the Mars mission, which is tentatively scheduled for the 2030s. However, Bridenstine said the space agency is committed to having a “broad and diverse set of talent.” Currently, 34 percent of active NASA astronauts are women. While the gender gap has not yet been closed, it’s still a significant change from 1978, when six women (including Sally Ride) became the first American female astronauts. In addition, women comprised half of the 2013 astronaut class and five of 12 astronauts in the 2017 class, as well as half of the most recent class of flight directors.

The first all-female spacewalk will take place on March 29, rounding out National Women’s History Month. Astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch will be assisted by flight directors Mary Lawrence and Kristen Facciol on the ground during the roughly seven-hour spacewalk. These events typically involve making repairs to the International Space Station—a job that has traditionally been undertaken by men.

[h/t CNN]

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